China using drones to weed out cheaters on college exam

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China Using Drones To Weed Out Cheaters On College Exam

Admit it, we've all cheated on an exam or a quiz at least once in our lives. Maybe you wrote notes on your hand or "dropped your pencil" to catch a glimpse of your neighbors test. Most of us got away with it, but good luck if you're a student in China.

According to Business Insider the Chinese province of Henan is using drones to weed out cheaters during The National College Entrance Exam.

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China using drones to weed out cheaters on college exam
JINAN, CHINA - FEBRUARY 27: (CHINA OUT) Nearly 8,000 students take part in the college entrance exam for art at Shungeng International Convention and Exhibition Center on February 27, 2015 in Jinan, China. About 900,000 applicants take the national college entrance exam for art in China every year. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
XI'AN, CHINA - JANUARY 12: (CHINA OUT) Exam markers inspect student's exam papers of the national college entrance examination of higher academy of fine arts at the paper inspection site on January 12, 2015 in Xi'an, Shaanxi province of China. This is the first time that the paper inspection site of the national college entrance examination of higher academy of fine arts has opened to the media. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
Armed policemen stand on patrol at the gate of a high school as students sit the 2014 college entrance exam of China, or the 'gaokao', in Wuhan, central China's Hubei province on June 7, 2014. Nearly 10 million high school students are sitting for China's make-or-break college entrance exams under tight security on June 7 to June 8. CHINA OUT AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read AFP/AFP/Getty Images)
This picture taken on June 7, 2012, shows a happy mother greeting her daughter after finishing the first day of the tough college entrance exams or Gaokao, in Beijing. More than 9 million students sat China's notoriously tough college entrance exams with 'high-flyer' rooms, nannies and even intravenous drips among the tools being employed for success, and with just 6.85 million university spots on offer this year, competition for the top institutions is intense, and attempts to cheat are rife -- 1,500 people have been arrested on suspicion of selling transmitters and hard-to-detect ear pieces. CHINA OUT AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/GettyImages)
Chinese students arrive for the first day of the tough college entrance exams or Gaokao, as their parents anxiously wait at the gate, in Wuhan, central China's Hubei province on June 7, 2012. More than 9 million students sat China's notoriously tough college entrance exams with 'high-flyer' rooms, nannies and even intravenous drips among the tools being employed for success, and with just 6.85 million university spots on offer this year, competition for the top institutions is intense, and attempts to cheat are rife -- 1,500 people have been arrested on suspicion of selling transmitters and hard-to-detect ear pieces. CHINA OUT AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/GettyImages)
Students sit the 2014 college entrance exam in China, or the 'gaokao', in Rongan, southwest China's Guangxi province on June 7, 2014. Nearly 10 million high school students are sitting for China's make-or-break college entrance exams under tight security on June 7 to June 8. CHINA OUT AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read AFP/AFP/Getty Images)
Chinese students arrive for the first day of the tough college entrance exams or Gaokao, as their parents anxiously wait at the gate, in Wuhan, central China's Hubei province on June 7, 2012. More than 9 million students sat China's notoriously tough college entrance exams with 'high-flyer' rooms, nannies and even intravenous drips among the tools being employed for success, and with just 6.85 million university spots on offer this year, competition for the top institutions is intense, and attempts to cheat are rife -- 1,500 people have been arrested on suspicion of selling transmitters and hard-to-detect ear pieces. CHINA OUT AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/GettyImages)
Students (front) wearing t-shirts saying 'fear nothing' walk into the exam room to sit the 2014 college entrance exam in China, or the 'gaokao', in Bozhou, east China's Anhui province on June 7, 2014. Nearly 10 million high school students are sitting for China's make-or-break college entrance exams under tight security on June 7 to June 8. CHINA OUT AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read AFP/AFP/Getty Images)
A Chinese mother brings a large soft toy for her daughter after she completed the first day of the tough college entrance exams or Gaokao in Wuhan, central China's Hubei province on June 7, 2012. More than 9 million students sat China's notoriously tough college entrance exams with 'high-flyer' rooms, nannies and even intravenous drips among the tools being employed for success, and with just 6.85 million university spots on offer this year, competition for the top institutions is intense, and attempts to cheat are rife -- 1,500 people have been arrested on suspicion of selling transmitters and hard-to-detect ear pieces. CHINA OUT AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/GettyImages)
A young student receives flowers from his parents after completing his college entrance exam, at a school in Beijing, China Friday June 8, 2007. He was one of the 9.5 million students across China taking the two-day college entrance exam, called "gaokao," which ended Friday afternoon. In a country where education is unrivaled in importance, the high-stakes testing is one of the few events short of next year's Olympics that can silence car horns and construction sites, alter traffic flow and even change flight paths.(AP Photo/Elizabeth Dalziel)
Students walk out from a schoolyard after finishing the first subject of the 2013 university entrance exam in Hefei, north China's Anhui province on June 7, 2013. More than nine million students packed exam halls across China for the opening day of the country's university entrance exam on June 7 -- with attempts to stop cheating even leading to bans on metal bra clasps. CHINA OUT AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
Parents wait outside the schoolyard as their children sit the 2013 university entrance exam in Hefei, north China's Anhui province on June 7, 2013. More than nine million students packed exam halls across China for the opening day of the country's university entrance exam on June 7 -- with attempts to stop cheating even leading to bans on metal bra clasps. CHINA OUT AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
XI'AN, CHINA - JANUARY 12: (CHINA OUT) Exam markers inspect student's exam papers of the national college entrance examination of higher academy of fine arts at the paper inspection site on January 12, 2015 in Xi'an, Shaanxi province of China. This is the first time that the paper inspection site of the national college entrance examination of higher academy of fine arts has opened to the media. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
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The test is considered the toughest in the world. Back in 2012 The New York Times wrote an extensive piece on the exam. Some students cram for the test while "hooked up to oxygen canisters and intravenous drips of amino acids during late-night and weekend study marathons."

There have also been reports of schools installing anti-suicide barriers on the balconies at exam halls in the wake of two student deaths.

Still some students cheat, many with the help of their parents. There are reports of students using things like pens and mini scanners that send test questions to a remote location and ear pieces to relay correct answers back from a team of experts.

Students are already screened for devices before entering the exam - women can't even wear bras with metal clasps - and now China is employing sophisticated drone technology to combat equally sophisticated cheating methods.

According to Wired, "the drone hovers 500 metres above the test site and has a range of around 1km. When it identifies a radio signal, it transmits the location of the signal to tablets used by staff."

The stakes are high if you're caught - cheaters are banned from taking the test for three years and could be prosecuted under Chinese law.

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