Ocean lovers raise pollution awareness via social media

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You Can't Imagine How Much Plastic Will Be In the Oceans 10 Years From Now

World leaders descend on Lisbon, Portugal, today for the annual World Ocean Council meeting with the goal of engaging the ocean business community in strategies for driving both economic development and environmental protection.

Top of mind issues are expected to include marine debris, illegal fishing, and developing new technology that will allow for sustainable growth of businesses that rely on the sea. As the 250 global leaders debate policies, economic conditions, and legal parameters, private citizens around the world continue their outcry on social media against the poor treatment of oceans in today's growing climate.

Trending hashtags including #banthebag, #take3forthesea, and #marinedebris capture global anger with different types of ocean pollution, plastic and otherwise. These hashtags lend a hand in enabling ocean lovers to share the problems with ocean pollution via social media.

Today's World Ocean Summit gives these economists the opportunity to open more Twitter discussions about their concerns. By including #OceanSummit in their tweets, economists have started a new social media trend bringing awareness to the issues at hand.

These issues include people needing to take responsibility for marine debris as well as illegal fishing taking place in Africa. People are also opening discussions about creative ways to save the oceans, such as implementing new devices that can be used to eliminate plastic in the waters.



Click through this gallery to see alarming pictures of ocean pollution:

8 PHOTOS
Plastic Debris in ocean
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Ocean lovers raise pollution awareness via social media
This 2008 photo provided by NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center shows debris in Hanauma Bay, Hawaii. A study released by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, June 30, 2014, estimated the total amount of floating plastic debris in open ocean at 7,000 to 35,000 tons. The results of the study showed fewer very small pieces than expected. (AP Photo/NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center)
This undated photo provide by NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program shows small plastic debris that are visible from the surface of the water. A study released by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, June 30, 2014, estimated the total amount of floating plastic debris in open ocean at 7,000 to 35,000 tons. The results of the study showed fewer very small pieces than expected. (AP Photo/NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program)
This undated photo provided by NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program shows debris collected inside the cod end of the manta net after a tow. The sample was dominated by very small plastic particles. A study released by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, June 30, 2014, estimated the total amount of floating plastic debris in open ocean at 7,000 to 35,000 tons. (AP Photo/NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program)
In this undated photo provided by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows pre-production resin pellets that are sometimes found in the ocean. A study released by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, June 30, 2014, estimated the total amount of floating plastic debris in open ocean at 7,000 to 35,000 tons. The results of the study showed fewer very small pieces than expected. (AP Photo/NOAA)
In this 2009 photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows a sample taken from the Patapsco River in Maryland. A study released by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, June 30, 2014, estimated the total amount of floating plastic debris in open ocean at 7,000 to 35,000 tons. The results of the study showed fewer very small pieces than expected. (AP Photo/NOAA)
FILE - In this Oct. 13, 2011 file photo, police officers monitor debris washed ashore on the Mount Maunganui Beach as a shipping container fallen from the grounded container ship Rena sits in the breakwater near Tauranga, New Zealand. Not only is the trash a time-wasting distraction for air and sea crews searching for debris from the Malaysia Airlines flight that vanished March 8, it also points to wider problems in the world’s oceans. The ocean is like a plastic soup, bulked up with the croutons of these larger items,” said Los Angeles captain Charles Moore, an environmental advocate credited with bringing attention to an ocean gyre between Hawaii and California known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. (AP Photo/New Zealand Herald, Mark Mitchell) AUSTRALIA OUT, NEW ZEALAND OUT
Jenna Jambeck, an environment engineering professor at the University of Georgia, holds a plastic baggie with trash collected last fall from a clean up at Panama Beach, Fla., Thursday, Feb. 12, 2015, at the AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science) conference in San Jose, Calif. Each year about 8.8 million tons of plastic ends up in the world oceans, a quantity much higher than previous estimates, according to a new study that tracked marine debris from its source. (AP Photo/Seth Borenstein)
Staff members and volunteers work to clean oil off a brown pelican at the International Bird Rescue office in the San Pedro area of Los Angeles, on Friday, May 22, 2015. A broken onshore pipeline in near Santa Barbara, Calif., spewed oil down a storm drain and into the ocean for several hours Tuesday before it was shut off. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
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