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India Heatwave Deaths Rise

1. The extreme heat wave in India has now taken over 1,400 lives as people crowd into rivers and shade to avoid the worst of the hot temperatures. The government is urging people to stay out of the sun as temperatures near 117 degrees Fahrenheit, but the country's widespread poverty was forcing many to continue working. Read more here.

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India heat wave, summer temperatures
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What to know this morning: In 5 minutes or less
NEW DELHI, INDIA - MAY 24: A road melt near Safdarjung Hospital after the Temperature rise to 45 degree Celsius during a hot weather as Delhi/NCR experienced yet another scorching day, on May 24, 2015 in New Delhi, India. The national capital sizzling today as heat wave-like conditions prevailed across the city with mercury hovering above 45.3 degree Celsius, making life tough for the Delhiites. (Photo by Sanjeev Verma/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)
An Indian man rests inside a concrete pipe on a hot summer day in Hyderabad, India, Wednesday, May 27, 2015. Hundreds of people have died in southern India since the middle of April as soaring summer temperatures scorch the country, officials said Tuesday. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A.)
An Indian boy carries a bottle filled with cold water as he goes to a market on a hot day in New Delhi, India, Monday, May 18, 2015. Intense heat-wave continues to grip several parts of north India with most of the cities crossing 40 degrees Celsius (104 degrees Fahrenheit) mark. (AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal)
Indian boys cool themselves at a fountain on a hot day in New Delhi, India, Monday, May 18, 2015. Intense heat-wave continues to grip several parts of north India with most of the cities crossing 40 degrees Celsius (104 degrees Fahrenheit) mark. (AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal)
An Indian drinks water from a bottle on a hot summer day in Allahabad, India, Sunday, May 31, 2015. Heat-related conditions, including dehydration and heat stroke, have killed more than 2,000 people since mid-April in the southern Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana, according to state officials. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)
FILE - In this Sunday, May 31, 2015 file photo, an Indian man rests in front of an air cooler to cool himself on a hot summer day in Hyderabad, in the southern Indian state of Telangana. Isolated thundershowers have failed to break a raging heat wave in the southern Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana, claiming dozens of lives over the weekend and raising the overall death toll to more than 2,000 since mid-April. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A., File)
An Indian man takes a nap inside a car on a hot summer day in Ahmadabad, India, Friday, May 29, 2015. Dizzying temperatures caused water shortages in thousands of Indian villages and killed hundreds more people over the past day, driving the death toll from a weeks long heat wave to more than 1,000, officials said Friday. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki)
An Indian vendor sleeps under a temporary shed on a hot summer day on the outskirts of Jammu, India, Friday, May 29, 2015. Dizzying temperatures caused water shortages in thousands of Indian villages and killed hundreds more people over the past day, driving the death toll from a weeks long heat wave to more than 1,000, officials said Friday. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
An Indian boy drinks water collected from a government water supply tap at an impoverished settlement on a hot summer day in Bhubaneswar, India, Saturday, May 30, 2015. Heat-related conditions, including dehydration and heat stroke, have killed more than 1,000 people in the southern Indian state of Andhra Pradesh and hundreds in Telangana since mid-April, according to state officials. (AP Photo/Biswaranjan Rout)
An Indian boy drinks water collected from a government water supply tap at an impoverished settlement on a hot summer day in Bhubaneswar, India, Saturday, May 30, 2015. Heat-related conditions, including dehydration and heat stroke, have killed more than 1,000 people in the southern Indian state of Andhra Pradesh and hundreds in Telangana since mid-April, according to state officials. (AP Photo/Biswaranjan Rout)
Indian children share an umbrella on a hot summer day in Hyderabad, India, Sunday, May 24, 2015. About 230 people have died since mid-April in a heat wave sweeping two southeast Indian states, Andhra Pradesh and Telangana, officials said Saturday. Day temperatures in Telangana's Khammam district soared to more than 48 degrees Celsius (118 Fahrenheit) on Saturday. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A.)
NEW DELHI, INDIA - MAY 24: Heat rippled mirage was seen at Rajpath during a hot weather as Delhi/NCR experienced yet another scorching day, on May 24, 2015 in New Delhi, India. The national capital sizzling today as heat wave-like conditions prevailed across the city with mercury hovering above 45.3 degree Celsius, making life tough for the Delhiites. (Photo by Vipin Kumar/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)
Indian rickshaw pullers sleep in their rickshaws on a hot summer day in New Delhi, India, Thursday, May 21, 2015. Most parts of northern India are reeling under heat wave conditions with the mercury expected to soar above 43 degree Celsius, or 111 degrees Fahrenheit, according to local reports. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)
An Indian man rests on the sacks of vegetables on a hot day at a wholesale market in Ahmadabad, India, Tuesday, May 19, 2015. For last few days, Gujarat, the western Indian state of India, has been in the grip of extreme heat-wave with temperature shooting up to 44 degrees Celsius (111 degrees Fahrenheit) throwing life out of gear. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki)
An Indian man swims in the River Yamuna on a hot summer day in Allahabad, India, Wednesday, May 27, 2015. Hundreds of people have died in southern India since the middle of April as soaring summer temperatures scorch the country, officials said Tuesday. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)
An Indian boy takes a bath at a fountain at India Gate in New Delhi on May 26, 2015. At least 800 people have died in a major heatwave that has swept across India, melting roads in New Delhi as temperatures neared 50 degrees Celsius (122 Fahrenheit). AFP PHOTO / Chandan KHANNA (Photo credit should read Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images)
An Indian coconut seller sleeps on his pushcart under the shade of a tree on a hot summer day in New Delhi, India, Sunday, May 24, 2015. Heat wave has tightened its grip over most parts of the country. More than 200 people have died since mid-April in a heat wave sweeping two southeast Indian states, Andhra Pradesh and Telangana, officials said Saturday. (AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal)
Indian motorcyclists use scarves to protect themselves from the heat in Amritsar on May 26, 2015. At least 800 people have died in a major heatwave that has swept across India, melting roads in New Delhi as temperatures neared 50 degrees Celsius (122 Fahrenheit). AFP PHOTO/NARINDER NANU (Photo credit should read NARINDER NANU/AFP/Getty Images)
Pigeons fly over a traffic signal near the Indian Presidential Palace during a brief dust storm in New Delhi, India, Tuesday, May 19, 2015. Heat wave continued in many parts of northern Indian even as capital Delhi witnessed a brief storm on Tuesday bringing temporary relief from the heat. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)
An Indian policeman stands in the shade at the Indian Defence Ministry in New Delhi on May 26, 2015. Large parts of India, including national capital New Delhi, have endured days of sweltering heat, prompting fears of power cuts. But the highest temperatures have been recorded in Telangana and neighbouring Andhra Pradesh state. AFP PHOTO / Chandan KHANNA (Photo credit should read Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images)
Indian fishermen catch fish in a shrunken pond in the village of Phaphamau on the outskirts of Allahabad on May 26, 2015. At least 800 people have died in a major heatwave that has swept across India, melting roads in New Delhi as temperatures neared 50 degrees Celsius (122 Fahrenheit). AFP PHOTO/SANJAY KANOJIA (Photo credit should read Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images)
An Indian auto rickshaw driver rests on a hot summer day in Hyderabad, India, Monday, May 25, 2015. Hundreds of people have died since mid-April in a heat wave sweeping two southeast Indian states, Andhra Pradesh and Telangana, officials said Saturday. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A.)
An Indian child cools off in a pond near India Gate amid soaring temperatures in New Delhi on May 24, 2015. AFP PHOTO / SAJJAD HUSSAIN (Photo credit should read SAJJAD HUSSAIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Indian girls shield themselves with scarves as they ride a motorcycle on a hot summer day in Hyderabad, India, Wednesday, May 27, 2015. Hundreds of people have died in southern India since the middle of April as soaring summer temperatures scorch the country, officials said Tuesday.(AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A.)
An Indian man covers his face as drives on a scooter under the hot sun in Hyderabad on May 26, 2015. More than 430 people have died in two Indian states from a days-long heatwave that has seen temperatures nudging 50 degrees Celsius (122 degrees Fahrenheit), officials said May 25. Officials warned the toll was almost certain to rise, with figures still being collected in some parts of the hard-hit Telangana state in the south of the country, and with no end in sight to the searing conditions AFPHOTO/ Noah SEELAM (Photo credit should read NOAH SEELAM/AFP/Getty Images)
An Indian passenger takes a bath beside rail tracks on a hot summer day at a railway station in Jammu, India, Monday, May 25, 2015. Severe heat wave conditions continue to prevail at several places in northern India with temperatures reaching 48 degrees Celsius (118 degrees Fahrenheit). (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
Indian vendors selling onions rest on a sidewalk under the shade of a tree on a hot summer day in Hyderabad, India, Monday, May 25, 2015. Hundreds of people have died since mid-April in a heat wave sweeping two southeast Indian states, Andhra Pradesh and Telangana, officials said Saturday. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A.)
An Indian man wipes sweat off his face on a hot summer day in New Delhi, India, Sunday, May 24, 2015. Heat wave has tightened its grip over most parts of the country. More than 200 people have died since mid-April in a heat wave sweeping two southeast Indian states, Andhra Pradesh and Telangana, officials said Saturday. (AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal)
An Indian man takes his buffaloes for a bath to provide relief from the heat at a pond in Hyderabad, India, Sunday, May 24, 2015. About 230 people have died since mid-April in a heat wave sweeping two southeast Indian states, Andhra Pradesh and Telangana, officials said Saturday. Day temperatures in Telangana's Khammam district soared to more than 48 degrees Celsius (118 Fahrenheit) on Saturday. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A.)
An Indian man takes a nap inside a car on a hot summer day in Ahmadabad, India, Friday, May 29, 2015. Dizzying temperatures caused water shortages in thousands of Indian villages and killed hundreds more people over the past day, driving the death toll from a weeks long heat wave to more than 1,000, officials said Friday. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki)
Indian men cover their head with handkerchief as they walks in the rain at Nehru Zoological Park in Hyderabad, India, Friday, May 29, 2015. According to weather reports, the heat wave scorching vast parts of the country would continue for a few more days though cloudy skies and sporadic showers have brought relief to the people in some states. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A.)
An Indian vendor sleeps under a temporary shed on a hot summer day on the outskirts of Jammu, India, Friday, May 29, 2015. Dizzying temperatures caused water shortages in thousands of Indian villages and killed hundreds more people over the past day, driving the death toll from a weeks long heat wave to more than 1,000, officials said Friday. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)
An Indian man enjoys high tide waves at the Arabian Sea coast in Mumbai, India, Friday, May 29, 2015. Dizzying temperatures caused water shortages in thousands of Indian villages and killed hundreds more people over the past day, driving the death toll from a weeks long heat wave to more than 1,000, officials said Friday. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)
An Indian man drinks water from a bottle as he quenches thirst to beat the scorching heat in Ahmadabad, India, Friday, May 29, 2015. Dizzying temperatures caused water shortages in thousands of Indian villages and killed hundreds more people over the past day, driving the death toll from a weeks long heat wave to more than 1,000, officials said Friday. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki)
Salesboys sit in a shop selling air coolers on a hot summer day in Ahmadabad, India, Thursday, May 28, 2015. Eating onions, lying in the shade and splashing into rivers, Indians were doing whatever they could Thursday to stay cool during a brutal heat wave that has killed more than 1,000 in the past month. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki)
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2. Scandal is now synonymous with the name FIFA following a raid that has shaken the soccer world. Several officials were arrested yesterday on corruption charges, including more than $150 million in kickbacks and bribes. Read more here.

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FIFA raids, controversy
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What to know this morning: In 5 minutes or less
Swiss attorney General Michael Lauber attends a press conference on June 17, 2015 in Bern. Swiss authorities are investigating the 2010 FIFA vote that awarded the 2018 World Cup to Russia and the 2022 tournament to Qatar. AFP PHOTO / FABRICE COFFRINI (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)
NAGOYA, JAPAN - DECEMBER 07: Chuck Blazer Chairman of the Organising Committee for the FIFA Club World Cup talks to the media during the FIFA Club World Cup Organising Committee Press Conference at Nagoya Marriott Associa Hotel on December 7, 2011 in Nagoya, Japan. (Photo by Shaun Botterill - FIFA/FIFA via Getty Images)
This is a combo of six file photos of the soccer officials involved in the US Justice Department of investigation into corruption at FIFA. From top left clockwise a Jeffrey Webb: Current FIFA vice-president and executive committee member, Concacaf president, Jose Maria Marin Current member of the FIFA organising committee for the Olympic football tournaments, Nicolas Leoz former FIFA executive committee member and Conmebol president, Eugenio Figueredo current FIFA vice-president and executive committee member, Jack Warner, former FIFA vice-president and executive committee member, Concacaf president, and Eduardo Li, current FIFA executive committee member-elect, Concacaf executive committee member . (AP Photo/File)
MIAMI BEACH, FL - MAY 27: An FBI agent wearing a mask carries a box from the headquarters of CONCACAF after it was raided on May 27, 2015 in Miami Beach, Florida. The raid is part of an international investigation of FIFA where nine FIFA officials and five corporate executives were charged with racketeering, wire fraud and money laundering conspiracies. (Photo by Joe Skipper/Getty Images)
MIAMI BEACH, FL - MAY 27: FBI agents carry boxes and computers from the headquarters of CONCACAF after it was raided on May 27, 2015 in Miami Beach, Florida. The raid is part of an international investigation of FIFA where nine FIFA officials and five corporate executives were charged with racketeering, wire fraud and money laundering conspiracies. (Photo by Joe Skipper/Getty Images)
MIAMI BEACH, FL - MAY 27: FBI agents carry boxes from the headquarters of CONCACAF after it was raided on May 27, 2015 in Miami Beach, Florida. The raid is part of an international investigation of FIFA where nine FIFA officials and five corporate executives were charged with racketeering, wire fraud and money laundering conspiracies. (Photo by Joe Skipper/Getty Images)
Federal agents load a van with boxes and computers taken from the headquarters of the Confederation of North, Central America and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF,) Wednesday, May 27, 2015, in Miami Beach, Fla. Swiss prosecutors opened criminal proceedings into FIFA's awarding of the 2018 and 2022 World Cups, only hours after seven soccer officials were arrested Wednesday pending extradition to the U.S. in a separate probe of "rampant, systemic, and deep-rooted" corruption. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
MIAMI BEACH, FL - MAY 27: FBI agents carry boxes from the headquarters of CONCACAF after it was raided on May 27, 2015 in Miami Beach, Florida. The raid is part of an international investigation of FIFA where nine FIFA officials and five corporate executives were charged with racketeering, wire fraud and money laundering conspiracies. (Photo by Joe Skipper/Getty Images)
Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch, center, arrives for a news conference to announce an indictment against nine FIFA officials and five corporate executives for racketeering, conspiracy and corruption, Wednesday, May 27, 2015, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Nine of the 14 that were indicted by the Justice Department are soccer officials, while four are sports marketing executives and another works in broadcasting. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 27: Attorney General Loretta Lynch speaks at a packed news conference at the U.S. Attorneys Office of the Eastern District of New York following the early morning arrest of world soccer figures, including officials of FIFA, for racketeering, bribery, money laundering and fraud on May 27, 2015 in New York City. The morning arrests took place at a hotel where FIFA members were attending a meeting for the world governing body of soccer (football) in Switzerland. The Justice Department unsealed a 47 count indictment early Wednesday charging 14 world soccer figures. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
In this Thursday April 14, 2011 file photo FIFA President Sepp Blatter, right, gives a FIFA pennant to Nicaragua's Soccer Federation President Julio Rocha during the inauguration of the construction of a new National Soccer Stadium in Managua, Nicaragua. Rocha is among the soccer officials that were arrested and detained by Swiss police on Wednesday, May 27, 2015, at the request of U.S. authorities after a raid at Baur au Lac Hotel in Zurich. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix, File)
This is a Thursday, Feb. 12, 2015 file photo of Jose Maria Marin, president of the Brazilian football confederation as he speaks during a press conference to announce the proposed host cities for football matches for the 2016 Rio Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Marin is among seven soccer officials that were arrested and detained by Swiss police on Wednesday, May 27, 2015, at the request of U.S. authorities after a raid at Baur au Lac Hotel in Zurich. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
In this Dec. 2, 2008 file photo Eduardo Li, president of Costa Rica's National Soccer Federation, speaks with FIFA vice- President Trinidad and Tobago's Jack Warner, unseen, during a visit to the Project Goal complex in Santa Ana, Costa Rica. Li is among seven soccer officials that were arrested and detained by Swiss police on Wednesday, May 27, 2015, at the request of U.S. authorities after a raid at Baur au Lac Hotel in Zurich. (AP Photo/Kent Gilbert, File)
In this Thursday, June 2, 2011 file photo, suspended FIFA executive Jack Warner gestures during a news conference held shortly after his arrival at the airport in Port-of-Spain, in his native Trinidad and Tobago. Suspended FIFA Vice President Jack Warner has resigned from world football's governing body and had the corruption charges against him dropped. Warner was suspended by FIFA last month along with Asian football chief Mohamed bin Hammam over allegations of bribery during the presidential election. (AP Photo/Shirley Bahadur, File)
In this May 1, 2014 file photo Eugenio Figueredo, president of CONMEBOL, the South America soccer confederation, speaks during a news conference in Bal Harbour, Fla.. Figueredo is among seven soccer officials that were arrested and detained by Swiss police on Wednesday, May 27, 2015, at the request of U.S. authorities after a raid at Baur au Lac Hotel in Zurich. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz, File)
In this Nov. 8, 2004 file photo Rafael Esquivel, President of the Venezuelan Soccer Federation, is shown in Caracas, Venezuela. Esquivel is among seven soccer officials that were arrested and detained by Swiss police on Wednesday, May 27, 2015, at the request of U.S. authorities after a raid at Baur au Lac Hotel in Zurich. (AP Photo/Leslie Mazoch, File)
This is a Wednesday, July 4, 2012 file photo of President of the South American Football Confederation, CONMEBOL, and former FIFA executive member, Paraguay's Nicolas Leoz as he speaks with former Brazilian soccer player Pele during a news conference in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Leoz was one of the 14 people indicted Wednesday May 27, 2015 in the U.S. on corruption charges. (AP Photo/Andre Penner, File)
In this March 12, 2015 file photo, CONCACAF President Jeffrey Webb speaks during a Confederation of North, Central America and Caribbean Association Football news conference in Philadelphia. Six soccer officials were arrested and detained by Swiss police on Wednesday, May 27, 2015, pending extradition at the request of U.S. authorities after a raid at Baur au Lac Hotel in Zurich. CONCACAF leader and FIFA vice president Webb of the Cayman Islands, was staying at the luxury hotel this week. It was unclear if he was detained. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
Costa Rican Football Federation acting President Jorge Hidalgo speaks during a press conference on May 27, 2015, in Lindora, 20 km west of San Jose, about the capture of Costa Rican Football Federation President Eduardo Li and six executives of FIFA in Zurich, Switzerland. AFP PHOTO / Ezequiel BECERRA (Photo credit should read EZEQUIEL BECERRA/AFP/Getty Images)
US Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch announces charges against FIFA officials at a news conference on May 27, 2015 in New York. The soccer officials arrested on Wednesday in an investigation into the FIFA governing body have corrupted the international game, Lynch said Wednesday. She spoke after Swiss authorities acting on the US indictments detained several FIFA leaders in a dawn raid in Zurich as part of a corruption probe that has rocked the sport's governing body. AFP PHOTO/DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
A graphic called "Sports Marketing Bribery Schemes" is displayed during a news conference announcing an indictment against nine FIFA officials and five corporate executives for racketeering, conspiracy and corruption at a news conference, Wednesday, May 27, 2015, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Nine of the 14 that were indicted by the Justice Department are soccer officials, while four are sports marketing executives and another works in broadcasting. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
A graphic called "The Enterprise" is displayed during a news conference announcing an indictment against nine FIFA officials and five corporate executives for racketeering, conspiracy and corruption at a news conference, Wednesday, May 27, 2015, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Nine of the 14 that were indicted by the Justice Department are soccer officials, while four are sports marketing executives and another works in broadcasting. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
FIFA spokesman Walter De Gregorio arrives to give a press conference at the FIFA headquarters, on May 27, 2015 in Zurich. Swiss police on Wednesday raided a Zurich hotel to detain six top football officials as part of a US investigation into tens of millions of dollars of bribes paid to sport leaders, Swiss authorities and media reports said. AFP PHOTO / FABRICE COFFRINI (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)
FIFA spokesman Walter De Gregorio gives a press conference at the FIFA headquarters, on May 27, 2015 in Zurich. Swiss police on Wednesday raided a Zurich hotel to detain six top football officials as part of a US investigation into tens of millions of dollars of bribes paid to sport leaders, Swiss authorities and media reports said. (Photo credit Fabrice Coffrini, AFP/Getty Images)
FIFA spokesman Walter De Gregorio gives a press conference at the FIFA headquarters, on May 27, 2015 in Zurich. Swiss police on Wednesday raided a Zurich hotel to detain six top football officials as part of a US investigation into tens of millions of dollars of bribes paid to sport leaders, Swiss authorities and media reports said. (Photo credit Fabrice Coffrini, AFP/Getty Images)
An FBI agent retrieves equipment from a van as he prepares to re-enter the offices of the Confederation of North, Central America and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF,) Wednesday, May 27, 2015, in Miami Beach, Fla. Swiss prosecutors opened criminal proceedings into FIFA's awarding of the 2018 and 2022 World Cups, only hours after seven soccer officials were arrested Wednesday pending extradition to the U.S. in a separate probe of "rampant, systemic, and deep-rooted" corruption. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
A staff waits prior to a press conference at the FIFA heaquarters on May 27, 2015 in Zurich. Swiss police on Wednesday raided a Zurich hotel to detain six top football officials as part of a US investigation into tens of millions of dollars of bribes paid to sport leaders, Swiss authorities and media reports said. (Photo credit Fabrice Coffrini, AFP/Getty Images)
FIFA Director of Communications Walter de Gregorio attends a press conference at the FIFA headquarters on May 27, 2015 in Zurich, Switzerland. Swiss police on Wednesday raided a Zurich hotel to detain top FIFA football officials as part of a US investigation. (Photo by Philipp Schmidli/Getty Images)
Picture taken from a cell phone video shows hotel employees holding a blanked to hide the identity of a person led out of a side entrance of the Baur au Lac hotel to a waiting car in Zurich, Switzerland, Wednesday, May 27, 2015. Six soccer officials were arrested and detained by Swiss police on Wednesday pending extradition at the request of U.S. authorities after a raid in the luxury hotel. The case involves bribes "totaling more than US$ 100 million" linked to commercial deals dating back to the 1990s for soccer tournaments in the United States and Latin America, the Swiss Federal Office of Justice said in a statement. (AP Photo/Rob Harris)
FIFA Director of Communications Walter de Gregorio reacts during a press conference at the FIFA headquarters on May 27, 2015 in Zurich, Switzerland. Swiss police on Wednesday raided a Zurich hotel to detain top FIFA football officials as part of a US investigation. (Photo by Philipp Schmidli/Getty Images)
FBI agents retrieve equipment from a van as they prepares to re-enter the offices of the Confederation of North, Central America and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF,) Wednesday, May 27, 2015, in Miami Beach, Fla. Swiss prosecutors opened criminal proceedings into FIFA's awarding of the 2018 and 2022 World Cups, only hours after seven soccer officials were arrested Wednesday pending extradition to the U.S. in a separate probe of "rampant, systemic, and deep-rooted" corruption. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
A man walks by the headquarters of the international soccer's top body FIFA in Zurich, on May 27, 2015. Swiss police raided the headquarters of FIFA in Zurich, seizing documents and data, the Swiss attorney-general's office said. The raids were part of an investigation already underway into money laundering and fraud involving FIFA's awarding of the 2018 and 2022 World Cups to Russia and Qatar respectively, a statement said. (Photo credit Fabrice Coffrini, AFP/Getty Images)
A cloud is seen above the headquarters of international soccer's top body FIFA, on May 27, 2015 in Zurich. Swiss policeraided a Zurich hotel to detain six top football officials as part of a US investigation into tens of millions of dollars of bribes paid to sport leaders, Swiss authorities and media reports said. (Photo credit Fabrice Coffrini, AFP/Getty Images)
A woman walks by a logo of international soccer's top body FIFA, on May 27, 2015 at the organization's headquarters in Zurich. Swiss policeraided a Zurich hotel to detain six top football officials as part of a US investigation into tens of millions of dollars of bribes paid to sport leaders, Swiss authorities and media reports said. (Photo credit Fabrice Coffrini, AFP/Getty Images)
Media gathers outside the Hotel Baur-au-Lac where Swiss authorities conducted an early morning operation on May 27, 2015 to arrest several top soccer officials and extradite them to the United States on federal corruption charges. FIFA said it was seeking to clarify the situation after six football officials were arrested in Zurich on the request of US authorities, suspected of receiving bribes worth millions of dollars. (Photo credit AFP/Getty Images)
People stand outside the Baur au Lac hotel in Zurich, Switzerland, Wednesday, May 27, 2015 where six soccer officials were arrested and detained by Swiss police on Wednesday pending extradition at the request of U.S. authorities after a raid. The case involves bribes "totaling more than US$ 100 million" linked to commercial deals dating back to the 1990s for soccer tournaments in the United States and Latin America, the Swiss Federal Office of Justice said in a statement. (AP Photo/Rob Harris)
FIFA senior Vice President Issa Hayatou of Cameroon, third right, checka his phone outside an hotel in Zurich, Switzerland, Wednesday morning, May 27, 2015. The Swiss Federal Office of Justice said six soccer officials have been arrested and detained pending extradition at the request of U.S. authorities ahead of the FIFA congress in Zurich. In a statement Wednesday the FOJ said U.S. authorities suspect the officials of having received paid bribes totaling millions of dollars. Swiss federal prosecutors also announced that they were to open criminal proceedings related to the 2018 and 2022 World Cups. (AP Photo/Graham Dunbar)
The Luzhniki Stadium which will host the final of the 2018 World Cup, is under reconstruction in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, May 27, 2015. After Swiss prosecutors opened criminal proceedings Wednesday into FIFA's awarding of the 2018 and 2022 World Cups, Russian Sports Minister Vitaly Mutko told The Associated Press "we've got nothing to hide." (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)
Two men talk to each other in front of the FIFA logo at the FIFA headquarters in Zurich, Switzerland, Wednesday, May 27, 2015. Swiss prosecutors opened criminal proceedings into FIFA's awarding of the 2018 and 2022 World Cups, only hours after seven soccer officials were arrested Wednesday pending extradition to the U.S. in a separate probe of "rampant, systemic, and deep-rooted" corruption. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
FIFA President Joseph Blatter s attends a news conference following the FIFA Executive Committee meeting in Zurich, Switzerland, on Friday, March 20, 2015. Among many topics, the Committee discussed the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar. (AP Photo/Keystone,Ennio Leanza)
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3. At least 15 people are dead and a dozen missing following the torrential rains and violent storms in Texas this week, and hundreds more have fled their homes following an evacuation order. The area is still under a dire threat of floods. Read more here.

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Texas and mexican border , Oklahoma flooding - severe weather 5/25 (AP Exchange)
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What to know this morning: In 5 minutes or less
A house built on tall piers is surrounded by flood water from the San Jacinto River Thursday, May 28, 2015, in Kingwood, Texas. Although the deadly thunderstorms that lashed much of Texas have tapered off, many cities were still in danger of flooding Thursday as heavy rain from earlier in the week poured downstream, swelling rivers. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)
HOUSTON, TX - MAY 27: The Brays Bayou flows after massive flooding May 27, 2015 in Houston, Texas. At least 19 people have been killed across Texas and Oklahoma after severe weather, including catastrophic flooding and tornadoes, struck over the past several days, with more rain expected. (Photo by Eric Kayne/Getty Images)
MIDLOTHIAN, TX - MAY 27: Workers tend to equipment used to pump water from Padera Lake as water pours over a temporary dam on May 27, 2015 in Midlothian, Texas. Officials feared that the temporary dam on Padera Lake would fail due to recent heavy rains in the area. Areas throughout Texas have expierenced flash flooding and numerous deaths due to weeks of heavy rainfall. (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)
SAN MARCOS, TX - MAY 27: Storm destruction along the Blanco River May 26, 2015 in San Marcos, Texas. Central Texas has been inundated with tornadoes and flash flooding the past several days. (Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)
SAN MARCOS, TX - MAY 27: Storm destruction along the Blanco River May 27, 2015 in San Marcos, Texas. Central Texas has been inundated with tornadoes and flash flooding the past several days. (Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX - MAY 27: Trees are submerged at Buffalo Bayou park after massive flooding May 27, 2015 in Houston, Texas. At least 19 people have been killed across Texas and Oklahoma after severe weather, including catastrophic flooding and tornadoes, struck over the past several days, with more rain expected. (Photo by Eric Kayne/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX - MAY 27: Diego Singleton's vehicle sits on Allen Parkway, the last remaining vehicle to be towed from underneath the Montrose Blvd. overpass following massive flooding May 27, 2015 in Houston, Texas. At least 19 people have been killed across Texas and Oklahoma after severe weather, including catastrophic flooding and tornadoes, struck over the past several days, with more rain expected. (Photo by Eric Kayne/Getty Images)
A man walks along the Blanco River where sweeping flood waters overturned vehicles and knocked down trees, Tuesday, May 26, 2015, in Wimberley, Texas. Authorities say recovery teams will resume looking for missing people in an area where punishing rains have destroyed or damaged more than 1,000 homes statewide. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Keith McNabb looks at the damage to his friend Mike Cook's house on Stone Canyon Street on the banks of the Blanco River near Wimberley, Texas on Sunday May 24, 2015. Flooding in Texas and Oklahoma has led to numerous evacuations. (Jay Janner/Austin American-Statesman via AP) 
Domingo Molina, right, paddles with his granddaughters Crystal, left, and Alicia, center, down a flooded street in Houston, Tuesday, May 26, 2015. Heavy rain overnight caused flooding and closure of sections of highways in the Houston area. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
WIMBERLEY, TX - MAY 26: A house near the Blanco River sustained heavy damage May 26, 2015 in Wimberley, Texas. Central Texas has been hit with severe weather, including catastrophic flooding and tornadoes over the past several days. (Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)
WIMBERLEY, TX - MAY 26: Debris is collected in front of Rio Bonito Resort May 26, 2015 in Wimberley, Texas. Central Texas has been hit with severe weather, including catastrophic flooding and tornadoes over the past several days. (Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)
WIMBERLEY, TX - MAY 26: Faculty and volunteers organize flood relief supplies at Wimberley High School May 26, 2015 in Wimberley, Texas. Central Texas has been hit with severe weather, including catastrophic flooding and tornadoes over the past several days. (Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)
WIMBERLEY, TX - MAY 26: Clothes and other flood relief supplies are gathered at Wimberley High School May 26, 2015 in Wimberley, Texas. Central Texas has been hit with severe weather, including catastrophic flooding and tornadoes over the past several days. (Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)
Vehicles left stranded on a flooded Interstate 45 in Houston, Texas on May 26, 2015. Heavy rains throught Texas put the city of Houston under massive ammounts of water, closing roadways and trapping residents in their cars and buildings, according to local reports. Rainfall reached up to 11 inches(27.9cm) in some parts of the state, national forecasters reported, and the heavy rains quickly pooled over the state's already saturated soil. AFP PHOTO/AARON M. SPRECHER (Photo credit should read Aaron M. Sprecher/AFP/Getty Images)
Water is seen along Memorial Drive in Houston, Texas, on May 26, 2015. Heavy rains throught Texas put the city of Houston under massive amounts of water, closing roadways and trapping residents in their cars and buildings, according to local reports. Rainfall reached up to 11 inches (27.9cm) in some parts of the state, according to national forecasters, and the heavy rains quickly pooled over the state's already saturated soil. AFP PHOTO/AARON M. SPRECHER (Photo credit should read Aaron M. Sprecher/AFP/Getty Images)
AUSTIN, TX - MAY 25: Murphy Canning and Annika Rolston watch as a street remains underwater from days of heavy rain on May 25, 2015 in Austin, Texas. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott toured the damage zone where one person is confirmed dead and at least 12 others missing in flooding along the Rio Blanco, which reports say rose as much as 40 feet in places, caused by more than 10 inches of rain over a four-day period. The governor earlier declared a state of emergency in 24 Texas counties. (Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)
WIMBERLEY, TX - MAY 26: Debris is collected in front of Rio Bonito Resort May 26, 2015 in Wimberley, Texas. Central Texas has been hit with severe weather, including catastrophic flooding and tornadoes over the past several days. (Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)
People stand near damaged homes and vehicles after a powerful tornado swept past in Ciudad Acuna, northern Mexico, Monday, May 25, 2015. A tornado raged through the city on the U.S.-Mexico border Monday, destroying homes and flinging cars like matchsticks. At least 13 people were killed, authorities said. The twister hit a seven-block area, which Victor Zamora, interior secretary of the northern state of Coahuila, described as "devastated." (AP Photo)
Damaged homes stand next to others that were razed when a powerful tornado touched down in Ciudad Acuna, northern Mexico, Monday, May 25, 2015. The tornado raged through the city on the U.S.-Mexico border Monday, destroying homes and flinging cars like matchsticks. At least 13 people were killed, authorities said. The twister hit a seven-block area, which Victor Zamora, interior secretary of the northern state of Coahuila, described as "devastated." (AP Photo)
Cars sit in floodwaters along Interstate 45 after heavy overnight rain flooded parts of the highway in Houston, Tuesday, May 26, 2015. Several major highways in the Houston area are closed due to high water. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
A man walks past a cabin that was torn from its foundation in a flood on the Blanco River days earlier, Tuesday, May 26, 2015, in Wimberley, Texas. Recovery teams were searching for as many as 12 members of two families who are missing after the rain-swollen river in central Texas carried a vacation home off its foundation, slamming it into a bridge downstream. The hunt for the missing picked up after a holiday weekend of terrible storms that dumped record rainfall on the Plains and Midwest, caused major flooding and spawned tornadoes and killed at least eight people in Oklahoma and Texas. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Domingo Molina, right, paddles with his granddaughters Crystal, left, and Alicia, center, down a flooded street in Houston, Tuesday, May 26, 2015. Heavy rain overnight caused flooding and closure of sections of highways in the Houston area. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
A vehicle left stranded on a flooded Interstate 45 in Houston, Texas on May 26, 2015. Heavy rains throught Texas put the city of Houston under massive ammounts of water, closing roadways and trapping residents in their cars and buildings, according to local reports. Rainfall reached up to 11 inches(27.9cm) in some parts of the state, national forecasters reported, and the heavy rains quickly pooled over the state's already saturated soil. AFP PHOTO/AARON M. SPRECHER (Photo credit should read Aaron M. Sprecher/AFP/Getty Images)
Gabby Aviles carries her daughter Audrey through floodwaters outside their apartment in Houston, Tuesday, May 26, 2015. Heavy rains overnight caused flooding in the Houston area. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
David McGinnis helps cleanup debris at a home that was flooded along the Blanco River, Tuesday, May 26, 2015, in Wimberley, Texas. Authorities say recovery teams will resume looking for as many as a dozen missing people, in an area where punishing rains have destroyed or damaged more than 1,000 homes and killed at least three people statewide this weekend. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Mark Taylor rides his bike through the flooded street in front of his house in Houston, Tuesday, May 26, 2015. Heavy rain overnight caused flooding and closure of sections of highways in the Houston area. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Water is seen at the top of a sign along a bike path near Memorial Drive in Houston, Texas on May 26, 2015. Heavy rains throught Texas put the city of Houston under massive amounts of water, closing roadways and trapping residents in their cars and buildings, according to local reports. Rainfall reached up to 11 inches (27.9cm) in some parts of the state, according to national forecasters, and the heavy rains quickly pooled over the state's already saturated soil. AFP PHOTO/AARON M. SPRECHER (Photo credit should read Aaron M. Sprecher/AFP/Getty Images)
Robert Briscoe removes a suitcase from his flooded car along Interstate 45 in Houston, Tuesday, May 26, 2015. Overnight heavy rains caused flooding, closing some portions of major highways in the Houston area. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Rescue personnel grab the the hand of a man stranded in rushing water at the northwest corner of Lamar Blvd. and 15th St. in Austin, Texas. Shoal Creek overflowed its banks and inundated the major traffic artery with rushing water. Several cars were stalled under and near the 15th St. bridge Monday, May 25, 2015. (Alberto Martinez/Austin American-Statesman via AP)

Vehicles are left stranded on Texas State Highway 288 in Houston, Texas on May 26, 2015. Heavy rains throught Texas put the city of Houston under massive amounts of water, closing roadways and trapping residents in their cars and buildings, according to local reports. Rainfall reached up to 11 inches (27.9cm) in some parts of the state, according to national forecasters, and the heavy rains quickly pooled over the state's already saturated soil. AFP PHOTO/AARON M. SPRECHER (Photo credit should read Aaron M. Sprecher/AFP/Getty Images)
AUSTIN, TX - MAY 25: Parts of the city are shown inundated after days of heavy rain on May 25, 2015 in Austin, Texas. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott toured the damage zone where one person is confirmed dead and at least 12 others missing in flooding along the Rio Blanco, which reports say rose as much as 40 feet in places, caused by more than 10 inches of rain over a four-day period. The governor earlier declared a state of emergency in 24 Texas counties. (Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)
AUSTIN, TX - MAY 25: Rising floodwaters at Shoal Creek are shown after days of heavy rain on May 25, 2015 in Austin, Texas. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott toured the damage zone where one person is confirmed dead and at least 12 others missing in flooding along the Rio Blanco, which reports say rose as much as 40 feet in places, caused by more than 10 inches of rain over a four-day period. The governor earlier declared a state of emergency in 24 Texas counties. (Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)

Rescue personnel from the Austin Fire Dept. bring a man to safety after he became trapped by rushing water at House Park. Shoal Creek overflowed its banks and transformed Lamar Blvd into a rushing torrent of muddy water. Several cars were stranded along the normally busy street Monday, May 25, 2015. (Alberto Martinez/Austin American-Statesman via AP)

AUSTIN, TX - MAY 25: Parts of the city are shown inundated after days of heavy rain on May 25, 2015 in Austin, Texas. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott toured the damage zone where one person is confirmed dead and at least 12 others missing in flooding along the Rio Blanco, which reports say rose as much as 40 feet in places, caused by more than 10 inches of rain over a four-day period. The governor earlier declared a state of emergency in 24 Texas counties. (Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)
Shelly Guzal and her son, Grant, 17, stand by the Blanco River by where an A-frame house owned by the Carey family once stood in Wimberley, Texas, Monday, May 25, 2015. Corpus Christi resident Jonathan McComb, 36, and his family were guest in the house when it was swept away by floodwaters Saturday night. McComb was able to escape but his wife, Laura, 33, and their children, Leighton, 4 and Andrew, 6, are missing. (Jerry Lara/The San Antonio Express-News via AP)
AUSTIN, TX - MAY 25: The flooded Whole Earth Provisions Company on Lamar Street is shown after days of heavy rain on May 25, 2015 in Austin, Texas. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott toured the damage zone where one person is confirmed dead and at least 12 others missing in flooding along the Rio Blanco, which reports say rose as much as 40 feet in places, caused by more than 10 inches of rain over a four-day period. The governor earlier declared a state of emergency in 24 Texas counties. (Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)
AUSTIN, TX - MAY 25: Ben Sioberman works to get water out of the flooded Whole Earth Provisions Company on Lamar Street after days of heavy rain on May 25, 2015 in Austin, Texas. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott toured the damage zone where one person is confirmed dead and at least 12 others missing in flooding along the Rio Blanco, which reports say rose as much as 40 feet in places, caused by more than 10 inches of rain over a four-day period. The governor earlier declared a state of emergency in 24 Texas counties. (Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)
AUSTIN, TX - MAY 25: Parts of the city are shown inundated after days of heavy rain on May 25, 2015 in Austin, Texas. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott toured the damage zone where one person is confirmed dead and at least 12 others missing in flooding along the Rio Blanco, which reports say rose as much as 40 feet in places, caused by more than 10 inches of rain over a four-day period. The governor earlier declared a state of emergency in 24 Texas counties. (Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)
AUSTIN, TX - MAY 25: Tape is stretched across a flooded Sixth Street after days of heavy rain on May 25, 2015 in Austin, Texas. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott toured the damage zone where one person is confirmed dead and at least 12 others missing in flooding along the Rio Blanco, which reports say rose as much as 40 feet in places, caused by more than 10 inches of rain over a four-day period. The governor earlier declared a state of emergency in 24 Texas counties. (Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)
WIMBERLEY, TX - MAY 25: A vehicle travels Ranch to Market Road 150 on May 25, 2015 outside Wimberly, Texas. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott toured the damage zone where one person is confirmed dead and at least 12 others missing in flooding along the Rio Blanco, which reports say rose as much as 40 feet in places, caused by more than 10 inches of rain over a four-day period. The governor earlier declared a state of emergency in 24 Texas counties. (Photo by Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images)
Leaves and branches are scattered throughout a flooded yard after a roof collapsed during a morning storm Sunday, May 24, 2015 in Houston at the Rockport Apartment Homes on S. Gessner. (Eric Kayne/Houston Chronicle via AP)
DPS Trooper Marcus Gonzales walks on the Hwy 12 bridge over the Blanco River in Wimberley, Texas, Sunday May 24, 2015. Flooding in Texas and Oklahoma has led to numerous evacuations. (Jay Janner/Austin American-Statesman via AP) 
George and Susan Kruger make one of three trips with their animals from their flooded house to safety on Sunday, May 24, 2015 in Purcell, Okla. Rising water from overnight rains began to rise early in the morning. The Krugers refused to leave their home and made several trips to retrieve five dogs and a baby chick. (Steve Sisney/The Oklahoman via AP) 
Gordon Welch surveys damage to the house his family has owned since 1964 along River Road next to the Blanco River in Wimberley, Texas, Sunday, May 24, 2015. Welch said that he and his wife watched the house get swept away by flood water. (Kelly West/Austin American-Statesman via AP) 
A home on the Blanco River was taken off its foundation after heavy overnight rain caused flash flooding in Wimberley, Texas, Sunday, May 24, 2015. Record rainfall was wreaking havoc across a swath of the U.S. Midwest on Sunday, causing flash floods in normally dry riverbeds, spawning tornadoes and forcing at least 2,000 people to flee. (Rodolfo Gonzalez/Austin American-Statesman via AP)
In this aerial photo an Army black hawk helicopter flies over the town of Martindale, Texas, near the San Marcos River, Sunday, May 24, 2015. Record rainfall was wreaking havoc across a swath of the U.S. Midwest on Sunday, causing flash floods in normally dry riverbeds, spawning tornadoes and forcing at least 2,000 people to flee. (Rodolfo Gonzalez/Austin American-Statesman via AP) 
Michael Williams uses a kayak to retrieve valuables from his mother Karleen Shaw's house on Sunday, May 24, 2015 in Lexington Okla. Williams forced his mother from the house Saturday night after the water level got waist high. (Steve Sisney/The Oklahoman via AP) 
Amy Schmitt walks through her flood-damaged patio Sunday May 24, 2015, in San Marcos, Texas. Record rainfall was wreaking havoc across a swath of the U.S. Midwest on Sunday, causing flash floods in normally dry riverbeds, spawning tornadoes and forcing at least 2,000 people to flee. (Erika Rich/Austin American-Statesman via AP) 
Heather Williams and Jayden Martinez Corpus, 12, assist the Villegas family in clearing flood-damaged furniture from their home Sunday May 24, 2015, in San Marcos, Texas. Record rainfall was wreaking havoc across a swath of the U.S. Midwest on Sunday, causing flash floods in normally dry riverbeds, spawning tornadoes and forcing at least 2,000 people to flee. (Erika Rich/Austin American-Statesman via AP)
Kino Rodriguez, 8, left, and Israel Rodriguez, 7, sit outside their families flood-damaged home and discuss their experiences with the flooding from the night before on Sunday May 24, 2015, in San Marcos, Texas. Record rainfall was wreaking havoc across a swath of the U.S. Midwest on Sunday, causing flash floods in normally dry riverbeds, spawning tornadoes and forcing at least 2,000 people to flee. (Erika Rich/Austin American-Statesman via AP) 
This aerial photo shows a home along the Blanco River that was taken off its foundation after rain caused flash flooding in Wimberley, Texas, Sunday, May 24, 2015. Record rainfall was wreaking havoc across a swath of the U.S. Midwest on Sunday, causing flash floods in normally dry riverbeds, spawning tornadoes and forcing at least 2,000 people to flee. (Rodolfo Gonzalez/Austin American-Statesman via AP)
Mike Graf, left, with the help of Ralph Kennedy, salvages some of his belongings in a neighbor's yard near Wimberley, Texas, Sunday, May 24, 2015. About 350 homes in the town of Wimberley were washed away by flash floods along the Blanco River, which rose 26 feet in just one hour and left piles of wreckage 20 feet high, Texas authorities said. (Jay Janner/Austin American-Statesman via AP)
Edgar Mascorro, left, and Emir Nevarez check out the damage on the rooftop at the Silver Springs Apartments in North Austin, Texas, Sunday, May 24, 2015. Record rainfall was wreaking havoc across a swath of the U.S. Midwest on Sunday, causing flash floods in normally dry riverbeds, spawning tornadoes and forcing at least 2,000 people to flee. (Ricardo B. Brazziell/Austin American-Statesman via AP)
Magdiel Paz trims damage trees at the Silver Springs Apartments in North Austin, Texas, Sunday, May 24, 2015. Record rainfall was wreaking havoc across a swath of the U.S. Midwest on Sunday, causing flash floods in normally dry riverbeds, spawning tornadoes and forcing at least 2,000 people to flee. (Ricardo B. Brazziell/Austin American-Statesman via AP)
In this aerial photo a barn with a Texas flag painted on its roof is surrounded by water near Martindale, Texas, after the San Marcos River flooded, Sunday, May 24, 2015. Record rainfall was wreaking havoc across a swath of the U.S. Midwest on Sunday, causing flash floods in normally dry riverbeds, spawning tornadoes and forcing at least 2,000 people to flee. (Rodolfo Gonzalez/Austin American-Statesman via AP) 
In this aerial photo a parking lot of Wal-Mart is submerged after the San Marcos River flooded in San Marcos, Texas, Sunday, May 24, 2015. Record rainfall was wreaking havoc across a swath of the U.S. Midwest on Sunday, causing flash floods in normally dry riverbeds, spawning tornadoes and forcing at least 2,000 people to flee. (Rodolfo Gonzalez/Austin American-Statesman via AP)
People walk by a damaged roof at the Silver Springs Apartments in North Austin, Texas, Sunday, May 24, 2015. Record rainfall was wreaking havoc across a swath of the U.S. Midwest on Sunday, causing flash floods in normally dry riverbeds, spawning tornadoes and forcing at least 2,000 people to flee. (Ricardo B. Brazziell/Austin American-Statesman via AP)
Carlos and Candy Cortez, comfort each other in the Redbird Aviation Terminal in San Marcos, Texas, Sunday, May 24, 2015, after they, their three children and one of their dogs were rescued from the roof of their San Marcos home by an Army helicopter after the Blanco River flooded. Their son A.J. Cortez, 6, lies on the couch next to them. Record rainfall was wreaking havoc across a swath of the U.S. Midwest on Sunday, causing flash floods in normally dry riverbeds, spawning tornadoes and forcing at least 2,000 people to flee. (Rodolfo Gonzalez/Austin American-Statesman via AP)
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4. Former New York governor George Pataki has just announced his bid for the 2016 presidential election. Read more here.

5. Big mistake: The U.S. military accidentally shipped live Anthrax samples to labs in nine states and to a U.S. air base in South Korea. 26 individuals are being given post-exposure treatments. Read more here.
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ARLINGTON, VA - JUNE 03: Director of Medical Programs for DoD Chemical and Biological Defense Cdr. Franca Jones demonstrates the protocol for shipping anthrax sample during a news briefing on the DoD Lab Review and Anthrax shipment investigation June 3, 2015 at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia. The Pentagon announced today the Defense Department may have accidentally shipped live anthrax samples out to at least 51 labs in 17 states, the District of Columbia and three foreign countries. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, VA - JUNE 03: Director of Medical Programs for DoD Chemical and Biological Defense Cdr. Franca Jones demonstrates the protocol for shipping anthrax sample as Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics Frank Kendall looks on during a news briefing on the DoD Lab Review and Anthrax shipment investigation June 3, 2015 at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia. The Pentagon announced today the Defense Department may have accidentally shipped live anthrax samples out to at least 51 labs in 17 states, the District of Columbia and three foreign countries. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
In this May 11, 2003, file photo, Microbiologist Ruth Bryan works with BG nerve agent simulant in Class III Glove Box in the Life Sciences Test Facility at Dugway Proving Ground, Utah. The specialized airtight enclosure is also used for hands-on work with anthrax and other deadly agents. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it is investigating what the Pentagon called an inadvertent shipment of live anthrax spores to government and commercial laboratories in as many as nine states, as well as one overseas, that expected to receive dead spores. (AP Photo/Douglas C. Pizac, File)
This image depicted numbers of Bacillus anthracis bacterial colonies, which had been allowed to grow on sheep's blood agar, SBA, for a 24 hour period. Note the classical appearance exhibited in the colonial morphology including a ground-glass, non-pigment. (Photo via Getty)
Chemistry student Jorge Rodriguez Martinez holds a sample of billions of Anthrax bacteria at the National School of Biological Sciences in Mexico City, Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2001. Two germ banks tucked away in Mexico City stock dozens of petri dishes filled with anthrax, the bacteria that have sparked a worldwide panic. But there are no armed guards, no security cameras and no health officials tottering about in germ-proof space suits. In fact, these labs sell, swap or even give away the potentially deadly microbe to those with scientific credentials. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)
Dr. Mohammed Ali, left, and Dr. Abdul Wakil stands in front of empty bottles of anthrax vaccine in a Ministry of Agriculture laboratory in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2001. The laboratory, which was under Taliban control for five years, produced anthrax vaccine for animals. The now defeated Taliban regime has long denied being involved in chemical or biological weapons research, but it seems to have taken an interest in the work being done at the lab, according to scientists there, and it wasrepeatedly hit by U.S. bombers. (AP Photo/Marco Di Lauro)
Dr. Abdul Wakil holds a bottle of solution used to make anthrax vaccine for animals in a Ministry of Agriculture laboratory in Kabul, Afghanistan on Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2001. The laboratory, which was under Taliban control for five years, produced anthrax vaccine for animals. The now defeated Taliban regime has long denied being involved in chemical or biological weapons research, but it seems to have taken an interest in the work being done at the lab, according to scientists there, and it was repeatedly hit by U.S. bombers. (AP Photo/Marco Di Lauro)
SLUG:NA/ANTHRAX DATE:10/16/08 QUANTICO, VA CREDIT: DOMINIC BRACCO II From left, forensic examiner Jason Bannan Ph.D., supervisory special agent Scott Decker, and supervisory special agent Matthew Feinberg, pose for a portrait on Oct. 16, 2008 at a lab in Quantico, VA. The three helped solve the anthrax investigation. (Photo by Dominic Bracco Ii/The Washington Post/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES - May 6: Amir Ettehadieh, Director of Research and Development at Universal Detection Technology, walks past the prototype anthrax-detection device unveiled May 6, 2004 in Los Angeles, California. Universal Detection Technology's Anthrax Smoke Detector monitors the overall level of spores in the air. A sudden spike in the level would indicate a release of spores such as would occur during in a biological terror attack. Instant anthrax exposure detection could save lives by giving patients time to take Cipro before the end of the four-day incubation period. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
The sequence of an anthrax DNA fragment is analyzed under ultraviolet light in this undated handout photo from the Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, N.M. Once the sequence has been determined by electrophoresis or ultra-fast flow cytometry, it can be compared to the anthrax sequence database at the lab to determine its age and geographic origin. (AP Photo/Los Alamos National Laboratory)
A microbiologist checks a petri dish for a bacteria culture in the micro biological laboratory of the regional authorities for food security and consumer protection in the German state Thuringia in Erfurt, eastern Germany, on Saturday, Nov. 3, 2001. Final tests on powder found in a letter that touched off an anthrax scare in Germany found no trace of a deadly bacterium, speakers of the government lab Robert Koch Institute said Saturday, Nov. 3, 2001. The letter was received by a person in the town of Rudolstadt in Thuringia. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)
Microbiologist Johannetsy Avillan streaks a sample of a bacterium to a blood plate in an anaerobe lab within the Infectious Disease Laboratory at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Monday, Nov. 25, 2013, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
House Oversight and Investigations subcommittee Chairman Rep. Tim Murphy (D-PA), holds up a bag as she speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 16, 2014, during a hearing on the incident last month at a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lab that handles bioterrorism agents. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke)
Microbiologist Tatiana Travis works with tubes of bacteria samples in an antimicrobial resistance and characterization lab within the Infectious Disease Laboratory at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Monday, Nov. 25, 2013, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
An employee of ATEV Protein Processing Corp. wearing protective gear works at a cattle farm near Tiszafured, 147 kms east of Budapest, Hungary, Friday, July 4, 2014, after persons were hospitalized due to possible anthrax infection. The patients are linked to an illegal slaughter of two cows at the farm where an on-the-spot inspection revealed the bacterium of anthrax. (AP Photo/MTI, Zsolt Czegledi)
FILE - In this July 16, 2014 file photo a chart is on display on Capitol Hill in Washington during the House Oversight and Investigations subcommittee hearing about an incident at a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lab that handles bioterrorism agents. Michael Farrell head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lab that potentially exposed workers to live anthrax, resigned an agency spokesman said Wednesday, July 23, 2014. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)
FILE - This Jan. 27, 2010, file photo shows the main gate at Dugway Proving Ground military base, about 85 miles southwest Salt Lake City. U.S. officials say systemic problems caused an Army facility to accidentally send live anthrax to other labs for more than a decade. At a press briefing Thursday, July 23, 2015 Pentagon officials said half the lots of anthrax produced at the Army's Dugway Proving Ground in Utah contained live anthrax after attempts to kill the bacteria failed. (AP Photo/Jim Urquhart, File)
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