Today in history: May 27th

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Today in History for May 27th


May 27th, 1937: The newly-completed Golden Gate Bridge opens to the public -- connecting San Francisco and Marin County, California. Louis Reggiardo helped build the famous suspension bridge.

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Golden Gate bridge construction
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Today in history: May 27th
The Golden Gate Bridge at San Francisco, the longest suspension bridge in the world was opened on May 27, 1937. A view taken from one of the towers of pedestrians swarming across the Golden Gate Bridge immediately after the opening. (AP Photo)
Picture dated October 1935 of the Golden Gate bridge, in the San Francisco Bay, during its construction. Construction began on 05 January 1933 and the bridge was inaugurated 27 May 1937 by Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who pushed a button in Washington, DC, signaling the official start of vehicle traffic over the Bridge. Idea of the engineer Joseph Strauss, it was the largest suspension bridge in the world. (Photo credit should read OFF/AFP/Getty Images)
circa 1935: One of the stanchions erected in the building of the Golden Gate bridge, connecting Marin and San Francisco, casts a shadow over houses at its foot. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images)
circa 1936: The twin towers of the bridge spanning the Golden Gate strait in California which will support a roadway between San Francisco and Marin County. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images)
Workers complete the catwalks for the Golden Gate Bridge, spanning the Golden Gate Strait, prior to spinning the bridge cables during construction in San Francisco, Ca., Oct. 25, 1935. (AP Photo)
Preparations for spinning the cables of the Golden Gate Bridge between Marin Country and San Francisco occupied crews October 10, 1935 . They were busy erecting storm cable system, telephone system and various units of the spinning equipment for the $35,000,000 structure. The cable, strectching from the tower in the foreground to the Marin Country or North side, will be 36 1/2 inches in diame. The Catwalks with some of the storm cables is shown. (AP Photo)
The Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco during its construction. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Workers install the first section of a huge safety net, at a cost of $98,000, that will extend from shore to shore beneath the Golden Gate Bridge span during construction of the bridge in San Francisco, Ca., Sept. 2, 1935. (AP Photo)
circa 1936: The 'Santa Clara' a ferry belonging to the Southern Pacific line sails under the first structures of the Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images)
Chief Engineer of National Parks Frank Kettredge with his chief counsel George H Harlan on the Golden Gate suspension bridge in San Francisco. (Photo by Fox Photos/Getty Images)
March 1937: The base of the south pier, one of the pillars supporting the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. (Photo by Fox Photos/Getty Images)
The U.S. Navy joined with San Francisco in celebration of the opening of the Golden Gate Bridge, May 30, 1937. A naval vessel had just passed under the world's longest suspension span, which crosses the famed entrance to San Francisco Bay. (AP Photo)
Picture dated 1950's of the Golden Gate bridge, in the San Francisco Bay. Construction began on 05 January 1933 and the bridge was inaugurated 27 May 1937 by Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who pushed a button in Washington, DC, signaling the official start of vehicle traffic over the Bridge. Idea of the engineer Joseph Strauss, it was the largest suspension bridge in the world. (Photo credit should read OFF/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins, center, wears a steel helmet during an inspection tour of the San Francisco tower of the Golden Gate Bridge, Ca., March 25, 1935. Perkins, who is the first female cabinet officer in American history, talks with G.A. McClain, bridge superintendent, left, and S.E. Stanley, rivet foreman. (AP Photo)
circa 1943: A warship approaches the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
File - In this May 27, 1937 file photo, military biplanes fly between the towers of the Golden Gate Bridge as pedestrians walk across the span during opening ceremonies in San Francisco. The bridge was heralded as an engineering marvel when it opened in 1937. It was the world's longest suspension span and had been built across a strait that critics said was too treacherous to be bridged. But as the iconic span approaches its 75th anniversary, the engineers who have overseen it all these years say keeping it up and open has been a feat unto itself. (AP Photo, File)
More than 200,000 people were estimated to have walked across the Golden Gate Bridge, world's longest suspension bridge, when it opened to the public, May 27, 1937, in San Francisco. This is an aerial view as the crowd arrived at the tollhouse. (AP Photo)
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1999: A U.N. tribunal in the Netherlands indicts Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic and four of his aides for war crimes in Kosovo. Two years later, Milosevic is arrested and handed over to the tribunal. In 2006, he's found dead in his prison cell, while still on trial.

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