Australians beware, there's a massive kangaroo in your midst

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Giant Kangaroo Moves into Australian Suburb

My, what big pecs you have.

That isn't something you would necessarily say when talking about a kangaroo, but that is in fact the case in one Australian city. In a suburb of Brisbane, Australia, an unusually muscular kangaroo has been roaming the streets and frightening residents by it's crazy stature.


At roughly 210 pounds, the buff kangaroo has been spotted around North Lakes, Queensland, among other areas. According to Reuters, kangaroos are a normal sight around Australia, but anything this big is unheard of.

Needless to say, if you see this guy in a dark alley, just turn around and walk the other way. You don't want to mess with him.

Click through the slideshow below to see another rare type of kangaroo!

13 PHOTOS
Rare albino kangaroos
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Australians beware, there's a massive kangaroo in your midst
(Photo via Getty)
An albino baby kangaroo and its mother hop around their enclosure at the Enghave Animal & Nature Park in Broerup, 256 kms (159 miles) west of Denmark's capital Copenhagen Friday April 24, 2009. The albino Bennett kangaroo has been exploring the world outside its mother's pouch for about two weeks, one of the owners of the park said. Karina Christensen, who owns the park with Niels Christensen, added that the albino kangaroo has not been named yet, because its sex is still unknown. Its mother also has no name, but its grandmother was named Snow White, she said. Albino kangaroos are very rare, with only about 1 of every 10,000 kangaroos being born white, Karina Christensen said. (AP Photo/POLFOTO, Holger Bundgaard)

Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) Wilsons Promontory National Park, Australia. (Photo via Getty)

Male baby Kangaroo Norman cuddles with its substitute mother and zookeeper Yvonne Wicht at the Zoo in Krefeld, Germany, Friday, Feb. 6, 2015. Norman was born in September and was expulsed by it's biological mother so that zoo keeper Wicht jumped into that role. The resettlement into it's family is planned for spring. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Rare albino kangaroo came into the world in May in Osijek ZOO, the last few weeks has ventured to go from mother and explore it enclosure. (Photo: Marko Mrkonjic/PIXSELL)
A rare albino kangaroo appears camouflaged against the coral sands of Lovers' Cove on Daydream Island in the Whitsundays archipelago off Queensland on July 11, 2010. Albinism (from Latin albus, 'white') is a congenital disorder characterized by the complete or partial absence of pigment in the hair due to the absence of an enzyme involved in the production of melanin and results from inheritance of the recessive gene alleles. (Photo by Torsten Blackwood, AFP/Getty Images)
Irwin Kangaroo, right, and Christie Carr, left, have found a new home at the Garold Wayne Interactive Zoological Park in Wynnewood, Okla, Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. (Photo via Getty)
Kangaroo with baby joey
Rare albino kangaroo came into the world in May in Osijek ZOO, the last few weeks has ventured to go from mother and explore it enclosure. (Photo: Marko Mrkonjic/PIXSELL)
Albino and brown kangaroo on green grass
A baby albino kangaroo looks out of it's mothers pouch at the zoo in Duisburg, Germany, Wednesday, May 29, 2013. Albino kangaroos in wildlife have a probability of 1 to 20,000. The same mother had an albino baby last year which was caught by a fox and died. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
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