EU to relocate 40,000 immigrants within union

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EU to relocate 40,000 immigrants within union
Migrants disembark from the Italian military ship 'Sfinge' in the port of Augusta, on the eastern coast of Sicily on May 21, 2015. In an unprecedented crisis on Europe's southern shores, around 5,000 people have died in the past 18 months attempting to cross the Mediterranean in a bid to flee war and poverty. AFP PHOTO / GIOVANNI ISOLIN0 (Photo credit should read GIOVANNI ISOLINO/AFP/Getty Images)
Migrants wait to disembark from Migrant Offshore Aid Station (MOAS) ship in the port of Messina, on May 16, 2015 following rescue operations at sea off the coast of Sicily in partnership with NGO Doctors Without Borders. AFP PHOTO / GIOVANNI ISOLINO (Photo credit should read GIOVANNI ISOLINO/AFP/Getty Images)
Migrants disembark from the Italian military ship 'Sfinge' as they arrived in the port of Augusta, on the eastern coast of Sicily on May 21, 2015. In an unprecedented crisis on Europe's southern shores, around 5,000 people have died in the past 18 months attempting to cross the Mediterranean in a bid to flee war and poverty. AFP PHOTO / GIOVANNI ISOLIN0 (Photo credit should read GIOVANNI ISOLINO/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman holds her baby as she arrives in the port of Catania following a rescue operation of 617 migrants off the coast of Sicily by British vessel HMS Bulwark, on May 14, 2015. AFP PHOTO / GIUSI COSENTINO (Photo credit should read GIUSI COSENTINO/AFP/Getty Images)
Migrants from sub-Saharan Africa sit at a center for illegal migrants in the al-Karem district of the Libyan eastern port city of Misrata on May 9, 2015, as they wait to be transported to a different detention center. Mohammed Khalifa al-Guwail, the acting prime minister of Libya's disputed government, urged European Union countries to help his administration tackle illegal immigration by sending boats for the coastguard. AFP PHOTO / MAHMUD TURKIA (Photo credit should read MAHMUD TURKIA/AFP/Getty Images)
Migrants wait to disembark from the Italian Navy corvette Sfinge at the Augusta harbor, near Siracusa, Sicily, Italy, Thursday, May 21, 2015. (AP Photo/Carmelo Imbesi)
A coffin is disembarked from the Italian Navy ship Sfinge at the Augusta harbor, near Siracusa, Sicily, Italy, Thursday, May 21, 2015. (AP Photo/Carmelo Imbesi)
An Italian Coast Guard ship carrying migrants arrives at Pozzallo's harbor near Ragusa, Sicily, Italy, Tuesday, May 19, 2015. European Union nations approved plans Monday for a naval operation that will go after the human trafficking networks that are sending thousands of migrants weekly across the Mediterranean toward Europe or to their deaths. The International Organization for Migration estimates that just 1,820 migrants have died or gone missing on the sea route to Europe this year compared to just over 200 in the same period last year. (AP Photo/Carmelo Imbesi)
Migrants wait to be disembarked from the Italian Navy ship Espero, at the Reggio Calabria harbor, southern Italy, Saturday, May 16, 2015. The shipwreck off the coast of Libya last month galvanized the European Union to devise a strategy to try to stop human trafficking, which often brings thousands of migrants daily to southern Italy after they are rescued at sea. (AP Photo/Adriana Sapone)
Rescued migrants are seen aboard the Monte Sperone ship of the Italian border police in the Mediterranean Sea, heading to the Island of Lampedusa, southern Italy, Thursday, May 14, 2015. The Monte Sperone takes part in the Frontex's Triton Operation patrolling waters off Italy. Triton currently has 10 patrol vessels, three offshore patrol ships, three aircraft and two helicopters at its disposal. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
Rescued migrants are seen aboard the Monte Sperone ship of the Italian border police in the Mediterranean Sea, heading to the Island of Lampedusa, southern Italy, Thursday, May 14, 2015. The Monte Sperone takes part in the Frontex's Triton Operation patrolling waters off Italy. Triton currently has 10 patrol vessels, three offshore patrol ships, three aircraft and two helicopters at its disposal. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)
Migrants line up to enter a Red Cross tent after disembarking from the Migrant Offshore Aid Station vessel ' Phoenix ' in the harbor of Augusta, Sicily, Southern Italy, Saturday, May 9, 2015. European Union plans to introduce a quota system obliging countries to share the burden of settling refugees unraveled Friday as member nations began rejecting the scheme. (AP Photo/Francesco Malavolta)
A Syrian child sleeps outside the Central Asylum Center as other leave the building during a protest over a lack of translator facilities and the slow asylum process in Athens, Thursday, May 14, 2015. This year has seen a significant increase in the numbers of refugees from war-torn Middle Eastern and African countries, as well as economic migrants, crossing illegally to Greece. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)
Migrants arrive on the ship of Hellenic coast guard at the port of Lesbos island on April 30, 2015. Since Greece bolstered controls along its land border with Turkey along the Evros River, illegal migrants have turned to the maritime route between Turkey and the Greek islands in the Aegean Sea, notably Lesvos, Samos, Kos and Chios. Out of the 283,000 migrants caught illegally entering the European Union in 2014, more than 220,000 arrived via the Mediterranean Sea, according to EU officials. AFP PHOTO / ANGELOS TZORTZINIS (Photo credit should read ANGELOS TZORTZINIS/AFP/Getty Images)
Refugees and immigrants take part in a demonstration against the policies of European union for migrants in Athens, on April 22, 2015. European governments came under increasing pressure to tackle the Mediterranean's migrant crisis ahead of an emergency summit, as harrowing details emerged of the fate of hundreds who died in the latest tragedy. AFP PHOTO / Angelos Tzortzinis (Photo credit should read ANGELOS TZORTZINIS/AFP/Getty Images)
Officers of Hellenic coast guard carry a Syrian migrant who was rescued and suffered from hypothermia as he tried to cross the sea borders of Greece at the port of Lesbos island on April 30, 2015. Since Greece bolstered controls along its land border with Turkey along the Evros River, illegal migrants have turned to the maritime route between Turkey and the Greek islands in the Aegean Sea, notably Lesvos, Samos, Kos and Chios. Out of the 283,000 migrants caught illegally entering the European Union in 2014, more than 220,000 arrived via the Mediterranean Sea, according to EU officials. AFP PHOTO / ANGELOS TZORTZINIS (Photo credit should read ANGELOS TZORTZINIS/AFP/Getty Images)
A young migrant looks through a police bus window in the port of Lesvos island on April 17, 2015. Since Greece bolstered controls along its land border with Turkey, along the Evros River, illegal immigrants have turned to the maritime route between Turkey and the Greek islands in the Aegean Sea, notably Lesvos, Samos, Kos and Chios. 2015 started with a major increase in the number of Aegean crossings : 10,445 against 2,863 in the same period of 2014, according to the Greek port police. AFP PHOTO / ANGELOS TZORTZINIS (Photo credit should read ANGELOS TZORTZINIS/AFP/Getty Images)
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BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union will seek to shift the migration burden away from Italy and Greece by relocating 40,000 asylum seekers to other EU countries, according to a draft document seen by The Associated Press Tuesday.

The relocation proposal, to be unveiled by the EU's executive Commission on Wednesday, would see new Syrian and Eritrean asylum seekers shared among 23 of the 28 member countries over the next two years. Britain, Denmark and Ireland will not take part.

The move comes as the number of desperate migrants crossing the Mediterranean to get to Europe continues to rise, with more than 80,000 landing so far this year. The International Organization for Migration estimates that 1,820 other migrants have died or gone missing on that journey.

The influx has left countries like Italy, Greece, Malta, Germany and Sweden carrying the biggest burdens.

Under the emergency relocation plan, which would have to be endorsed by member states and the European Parliament, countries "will receive 6,000 euros ($6,531) for each person relocated on their territories" from EU coffers, according to the document.

Germany would accept the most asylum seekers over the two years — a total of 8,763 — while France would take in 6,752. Spain, which faces migration challenges of its own, would also take a significant share, accepting 4,288 people in need of international protection.

The commission is also set to announce a proposal to resettle 20,000 people from outside the EU who have been identified as being in need of international protection. They would be shared among all 28 member states over the next two years based on a distribution index.

Earlier on Tuesday, the IOM urged the EU to accept far more than 20,000 asylum seekers.

"The 20,000 quota is commendable. We're glad for it," IOM Director General William Lacy Swing told EU lawmakers, but he added that Europe "needs to go much, much further."

Swing said the "drivers of migration are such that large-scale migration is going to remain a mega-trend of our century."

He said the 20,000 migrant figure should serve as a starting point to "try to build a level of confidence" to go further.

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