Earth's temperature paces toward another record-breaking year

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
2015 Report: On Pace for Record Warm Year
The latest report on Earth's temperature is adding to the evident impact of global warming. 2015 appears to be on-pace for another record-breaking year of warmth following new data released from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association.

According to NOAA, the oceans are largely to blame for quickly rising temperatures. Sea surface temperatures in April were 1.08 degrees Fahrenheit above average, causing overall increased heat. NASA and the Japan Meteorological Agency both back up NOAA's overall findings and confirm that is Earth is pacing toward another record-breaking heat year following 2014.

An El Niño condition, a climate cycle that can alter weather patterns from East Africa to Florida, is making things worse for climate temperatures. "El Niño conditions tend to enhance global temperatures, with stronger events having generally larger impacts," a NOAA analysis found.

The NOAA explains in a statement why rising sea temperatures will have a substantial impact on Earth's climate.

Via NOAA

The implications of a warmer ocean are considerable. First, because water expands as it warms, ocean heating is responsible for much of the sea-level rise we've observed.

Click through these photos on global warming for further information on the state of our climate:

23 PHOTOS
Global warming to resume
See Gallery
Earth's temperature paces toward another record-breaking year
A woman sunbathes on the beach in Brighton on July 18, 2014, as parts of the country were expected to experience the hottest day of the year so far and the Met Office issued a heatwave alert for southern England and the Midlands. AFP PHOTO / CARL COURT (Photo credit should read CARL COURT/AFP/Getty Images)
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and NASA both agree that 2014 is the hottest year on record ever. Matt Sampson has the details.
A woman sunbathes in central London on July 18, 2014 as parts of the country were expected to experience the hottest day of the year so far and the Met Office issued a heatwave alert for southern England and the Midlands. AFP PHOTO/BEN STANSALL (Photo credit should read BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images)
People gather on the beach in Brighton on July 18, 2014, as parts of the country were expected to experience the hottest day of the year so far and the Met Office issued a heatwave alert for southern England and the Midlands. AFP PHOTO / CARL COURT (Photo credit should read CARL COURT/AFP/Getty Images)
Fishermen choose a picturesque spot to cast their lines from the rocks at Seal Beach, California, as the sun prepares to set on June 28, 2014. Summer in California this year is expected to be the hottest and driest on record as nearly one-third of the state experiences 'exceptional' drought levels, the highest percentage ever recorded by the Drought Monitor, whch began monitoring in 2000, according to reports last week from the National Climatic Data Center. AFP PHOTO/Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
A life guard keeps watch on the beach in Brighton on July 18, 2014, as parts of the country were expected to experience the hottest day of the year so far and the Met Office issued a heatwave alert for southern England and the Midlands. AFP PHOTO / CARL COURT (Photo credit should read CARL COURT/AFP/Getty Images)
A couple rest in the heat of the day in Sydney on January 6, 2015. Australia experienced its third-hottest year on record in 2014, paving the way for an early start to the bushfire season, scientists said on January 6 as hundreds of firefighters battled blazes in three states. AFP PHOTO / Peter PARKS (Photo credit should read PETER PARKS/AFP/Getty Images)
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - MAY 23: A general view of swimmers at Bondi Icebergs on May 23, 2014 in Sydney, Australia. Sydney is experiencing it's hottest May on record, already recording it's hottest week for this time of year in over 150 years. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - MAY 23: A general view of swimmers at Bronte Beach on May 23, 2014 in Sydney, Australia. Sydney is experiencing it's hottest May on record, already recording it's hottest week for this time of year in over 150 years. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - MAY 23: A general view of sunbathers at Bondi Beach on May 23, 2014 in Sydney, Australia. Sydney is experiencing it's hottest May on record, already recording it's hottest week for this time of year in over 150 years. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - MAY 23: A general view of Bronte Beach on May 23, 2014 in Sydney, Australia. Sydney is experiencing it's hottest May on record, already recording it's hottest week for this time of year in over 150 years. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - MAY 23: Children play in a pond on May 23, 2014 in Sydney, Australia. Sydney is experiencing it's hottest May on record, already recording it's hottest week for this time of year in over 150 years. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)
A fisherman sleeps on his boat as children swim behind him in a river to beat the summer heat in Manila on May 26, 2014. The Philippines has been experiencing the hottest days of the year with temperatures of 35 degrees Celsius (95 Fahrenheit) recorded in parts of the city. AFP PHOTO / NOEL CELIS (Photo credit should read NOEL CELIS/AFP/Getty Images)
(NOAA)
(NOAA)
Sunspots (shown in white) vary across multi-year cycles, causing solar irradiance, which influences the Earth's climate, to also fluctuate.
Solar irradiance from sun spots (shown in white) was high at the turn of the century. It led climatologists to believe temperatures would keep rising.
High levels of irradiance from the sun spots (shown in white) continued through about 2001.
This chart shows dramatic spikes in solar irradiance across the 1980s and 1990s before leveling off for the previous 14 years.
The sun spots then all but vanished around the beginning of 2002 and have yet to return. Scientists believe that when they do, global warming will also resume.
This image provided by NASA shows a 'Blue Marble' image of the Earth taken from the The Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite or VIIRS instrument aboard NASA's most recently launched Earth-observing satellite - Suomi NPP. This composite image uses a number of swaths of the Earth's surface taken on Jan. 4, 2012. The NPP satellite was renamed 'Suomi NPP' on Jan. 24, 2012 to honor the late Verner E. Suomi of the University of Wisconsin. Suomi NPP is NASA's next Earth-observing research satellite. It is the first of a new generation of satellites that will observe many facets of our changing Earth. Suomi NPP is carrying five instruments on board. (AP Photo/NASA)
Volcanic eruptions, like this one August 13 at Mount Etna on the southern Italian island of Sicily near Catania, have also contributed to the slow down in global warming buy launching particulates into the air that further diluted the sun's rays.
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

More on AOL.com:
This day in history: Hubble's first image made space blurry and underwhelming
Rare 61-second minute sends Wall Street scrambling
Chicken almost doesn't recognize his 8-year-old best friend after haircut

Read Full Story

From Our Partners