What to know this morning: In 5 minutes or less

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...

1. ISIS militants have likely killed up to 500 Iraqi civilians, sending thousands fleeing from their homes as the city of Ramadi fell to the extremist group, officials said Monday. Read more here.

2. Amtrak has resumed service on the Northeast Corridor from Washington to Boston, almost a week after the deadly crash. The first train, a 5:30 am southbound train left New York's Penn Station on time. Read more here.

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Amtrak accident aftermath
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What to know this morning: In 5 minutes or less
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 13: Police shut down a ramp that lead to a train track near the site of a train derailment accident May 13, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Service has been interrupted after Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia last night, killing at least seven people and injured more than 200. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 15: A construction worker begins to unload heavy machinery from a truck to repair damaged train tracks at the crash site of this week's Amtrak passenger train on May 15, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. At least 8 people were killed and more than 200 others were injured in the train derailment carrying more than 200 passengers from Washington, DC to New York. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 15: NTSM spokesperson Robert Sumwalt is interviewed about the Amtrak crash near the wreckage of this week's Amtrak passenger train on May 15, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. At least eight people were killed and more than 50 others were injured in the train crash carrying more than 200 passengers from Washington, DC to New York, which derailed on May 12, 2015 in north Philadelphia. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 14: NTSB spokesmen Robert Sumwalt walks over to speak to the media about the Amtrak train derailment, May 14, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Today rescue workers recovered another body from the wreckage after Tuesday night's Amtrak train derailment in Philadelphia, the death toll now at eight with more than 200 injured. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 14: Joseph Boardman (L), President and CEO of Amtrak listens to Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter (L) speak about the Amtrak train derailment, May 14, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Today rescue workers recovered another body from the wreckage after Tuesday night's Amtrak train derailment in Philadelphia, the death toll now at eight with more than 200 injured. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 14: Investigators and rescue personnel gather near the site of the Amtrak train derailment May 14, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Service has been interrupted after an Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia on Tuesday night, killing at least seven people and injured more than 200. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 13: In this handout image supplied by NTSB, NTSB IIC Mike Flanigon (R) with Member Robert Sumwalt (L) and Vice Chairman Dinh-Zarr (Center-L) work on the scene of the Amtrak Train #188 derailment on May 13, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Service has been interrupted after Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia last night, killing at least seven people and injured more than 200. (Photo by NTSBgov via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 13: Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter briefs members of the media near the site of a train derailment accident May 13, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Service has been interrupted after Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia last night, killing at least seven people and injured more than 200. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 13: In this handout image supplied by NTSB, NTSB member Robert Sumwalt works on the scene of the Amtrak Train #188 derailment on May 13, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Service has been interrupted after Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia last night, killing at least seven people and injured more than 200. (Photo by NTSBgov via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 13: In this handout image supplied by NTSB, The NTSB Go Team arrives on the scene of the Amtrak Train #188 Derailment on May 13, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Service has been interrupted after Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia last night, killing at least seven people and injured more than 200. (Photo by NTSBgov via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 13: In this handout image supplied by NTSB, NTSB Recorder Specialist Cassandra Johnson (2nd R) works with officials on the scene of the Amtrak Train #188 derailment on May 13, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Service has been interrupted after Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia last night, killing at least seven people and injured more than 200. (Photo by NTSBgov via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 13: In this handout image supplied by NTSB, NTSB IIC Mike Flanigon (L) briefs Vice Chairman Dinh-Zarr on the scene of the Amtrak Train #188 derailmenton May 13, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Service has been interrupted after Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia last night, killing at least seven people and injured more than 200. (Photo by NTSBgov via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 13: In this handout image supplied by NTSB, NTSB member Robert Sumwalt with Philadelphia officials The NTSB Go Team arrives on the scene of the Amtrak Train #188 derailment on May 13, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Service has been interrupted after Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia last night, killing at least seven people and injured more than 200. (Photo by NTSBgov via Getty Images)
As Philadelphia Fire Commissioner Derrick Sawyer, right, Amtrak CEO Joeseph Boardman, second right, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf, second front left, listen as Mayor Michael Nutter, right at podium, announces that an eighth body has been found and all believed to be aboard a deadly train derailment have been accounted for , Thursday, May 14, 2015, in Philadelphia. An Amtrak train headed to New York City derailed and crashed in Philadelphia on Tuesday night killing eight people and and sending more than 200 passengers and crew to area hospitals. Investigators have said the Amtrak passenger train was going more than twice the allowed speed when it shot off a sharp curve. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Investigators, center back, stand on the tracks near Tuesday's deadly train derailment, Thursday, May 14, 2015, in Philadelphia. An Amtrak train headed to New York City derailed and crashed in Philadelphia on Tuesday night killing at least seven people and sending more than 200 passengers and crew to area hospitals. The engineer in this week's deadly train derailment doesn't remember the crash, his lawyer said Thursday, complicating the investigation into why the Amtrak passenger train was going more than twice the allowed speed when it shot off a sharp curve. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
A flat bed truck hauls a section of new railroad track to the site of Tuesday's deadly train derailment, Thursday, May 14, 2015, in Philadelphia. At least seven people are dead and more than 200 people aboard injured, when the New York City bound Amtrak train derailed. Federal investigators have determined that the train was barreling through the city at 106 mph before it ran off the rails along a sharp curve where the speed limit drops to just 50 mph. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
National Transportation Safety Board member Robert Sumwalt speaks during a news conference Thursday, May 14, 2015, in Philadelphia. Sumwalt said the Amtrak train that derailed Tuesday in Philadelphia sped up for a full minute before it derailed at a sharp curve, killing eight people and injuring more than 200. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Graphic shows an annotated aerial image of the site of the crash including derailment area and placement of train cars after the crash.; 4c x 3 inches; 195.7 mm x 76 mm;
National Transportation Safety Board member Robert Sumwalt speaks during a news conference Thursday, May 14, 2015, in Philadelphia. Sumwalt said the Amtrak train that derailed Tuesday in Philadelphia sped up for a full minute before it derailed at a sharp curve, killing eight people and injuring more than 200. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf, center left, and Mayor Michael Nutter, center right, walk with others after visiting the investigation at the scene of Tuesday's deadly train derailment Thursday, May 14, 2015, in Philadelphia. Nutter announced that an eighth body has been found and all believed to be aboard a deadly train derailment have been accounted for. An Amtrak train headed to New York City derailed and crashed in Philadelphia on Tuesday night killing eight people and and sending more than 200 passengers and crew to area hospitals. Investigators have said the Amtrak passenger train was going more than twice the allowed speed when it shot off a sharp curve. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 13: Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter briefs members of the media near the site of a train derailment accident May 13, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Service has been interrupted after Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia last night, killing at least seven people and injured more than 200. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
As Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter, center left, listens Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf addresses a gathering near the site of Tuesday's deadly train derailment Thursday, May 14, 2015, in Philadelphia. An Amtrak train headed to New York City derailed and crashed in Philadelphia on Tuesday night killing eight people and and sending more than 200 passengers and crew to area hospitals. Investigators have said the Amtrak passenger train was going more than twice the allowed speed when it shot off a sharp curve. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
As Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter, left, listens Amtrak CEO, Joseph Boardman discusses Tuesday's deadly train derailment Thursday, May 14, 2015, in Philadelphia. An Amtrak train headed to New York City derailed and crashed in Philadelphia on Tuesday night killing eight people and and sending more than 200 passengers and crew to area hospitals. Investigators have said the Amtrak passenger train was going more than twice the allowed speed when it shot off a sharp curve. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Investigators, center back, stand on the tracks near Tuesday's deadly train derailment, Thursday, May 14, 2015, in Philadelphia. An Amtrak train headed to New York City derailed and crashed in Philadelphia on Tuesday night killing at least seven people and sending more than 200 passengers and crew to area hospitals. The engineer in the deadly train derailment doesn't remember the crash, his lawyer said Thursday, complicating the investigation into why the Amtrak passenger train was going more than twice the allowed speed when it shot off a sharp curve. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
A crane lifts a section of new railroad track from a flat bed track at the site of Tuesday's deadly train derailment, Thursday, May 14, 2015, in Philadelphia. At least seven people are dead and more than 200 people aboard injured, when the New York City bound Amtrak train derailed. Federal investigators have determined that the train was barreling through the city at 106 mph before it ran off the rails along a sharp curve where the speed limit drops to just 50 mph. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter, center right, hugs Lori Dee Patterson, a nearby resident, after she handed him a cup of coffee after he spoke at a news conference near the scene of a deadly train derailment, Wednesday, May 13, 2015, in Philadelphia. An Amtrak train headed to New York City derailed and crashed in Philadelphia on Tuesday night, killing at least six people and injuring dozens more. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 14: NTSB spokesmen Robert Sumwalt briefs the media on the latest findings into Tueday's Amtrak train derailment, May 14, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Today another body was found raising the death toll to eight with more than 200 injured. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 14: Members of the National Transportation Safety Board gather near the site of the Amtrak train derailment May 14, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Service has been interrupted after an Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia on Tuesday night, killing at least seven people and injured more than 200. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 14: Police gather near the site of the Amtrak train derailment May 14, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Service has been interrupted after an Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia on Tuesday night killing at least seven people and injured more than 200. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 13: Repair crews inspect damages at the site of a train derailment accident May 13, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Service has been interrupted after an Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia last night, killing at least seven people and injured more than 200. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 13: NTSB member Robert Sumwalt briefs members of the media near the site of a train derailment accident May 13, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Service has been interrupted after an Amtrak train derailed in Philadelphia last night, killing at least seven people and injured more than 200. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Maintance workers repair damaged lines after poles were knocked over when an Amtrak Northeast Regional Train derailed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on May 13, 2015. US investigators on Wednesday painstakingly combed through the twisted wreckage of an Amtrak train for clues as to why it derailed in Philadelphia, leaving at least six people dead and more than 200 injured. Officials warned the death toll could rise after the crash late Tuesday along the busy northeast US rail corridor linking Washington and New York, as some of the 243 passengers and crew believed to have been on the train had not yet been accounted for. AFP PHOTO/ ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS (Photo credit should read Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images)
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3. President Obama has tightened regulations on weapons police officers are allowed to carry -- prohibiting some military-style equipment that had formerly been given to local departments. Read more here.

Obama Limiting Military-Style Equipment for Police

4. Last night's Billboard Music Awards were a big night for Taylor Swift who took home eight trophies, becoming the most decorated star in Billboard history with 20 wins. Read the full list of winners here.

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Billboard Music Awards
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What to know this morning: In 5 minutes or less

Nobody can upstage J.Lo! The stunning singer, who recently signed a deal for a Las Vegas residency, showed she'll be the reigning queen of Sin City in a revealing sheer dress with silver sparkles coving up her lady parts. She polished off the look with tousled tresses and smoky eyes.  (Photo by Steve Granitz/WireImage)

White hot! Taylor Swift showed off her fit physique in a daring jumpsuit, which featured major cutouts and a halter neckline. She finished off her sultry style with smoky eyes, sleek locks, and a black clutch. The "1989" singer is definitely taking more chances with her fashion -- and we love it. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)

Mariah Carey definitely isn't slowing down her fashion game. The 45-year-old singer turned up the heat with a black dress with sheer panels, a super-high hemline, a long train, and of course, a plunging neckline. The best part of Mimi's look though? The sunglasses she has in her hand. Typical, Mariah. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
Daddy had a date! Chris Brown looked dapper in a blazer and loafers, but he was totally outdone by his daughter, Royalty, who hit the red carpet in a tulle skirt and Timberlands. (Photo by Gregg DeGuire/WireImage)
Kendall Jenner opted for a demure and fashion-forward ensemble with an oversized blazer and skinny jeans. It's a refreshing look for Jenner, who typically gravitates toward more daring getups.  (Photo by Larry Busacca/BMA2015/Getty Images for dcp)

 Meghan Trainor brought the sparkle to the BBMAs in a sequined, hunter green dress with a bold side-slit. 

 (Photo by Steve Granitz/WireImage)

Way to keep it classy, Britney! Britney Spears looked lovely in a simple gold dress, which she paired with sleek locks. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)

Whoa! "Empire's" queen bee Taraji P. Henson turned heads in barely-there dress, which featured a plunging neckline, and revealing cutouts. The sexy gown showed off her fit figure -- but it may have been a little too close to showing off her derriere.  (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)

Stunning couple alert! Chrissy Teigen, who is co-hosting tonight's awards with Ludacris, cozied up to her hubby and nominee John Legend. The power couple looked fabulous as usual, but Teigen out-shined her man in a metallic jumpsuit with a daring neckline. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/BMA2015/WireImage)
Iggy Azalea definitely took a fashion risk with her powder blue crop top and skirt combo, which had a sheer side panel. Unfortunately, we're a little underwhelmed by the look. We do, however, like the "Booty" singer's dip-dyed pink tresses, which matched her footwear. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
50 Cent arrives at the Billboard Music Awards at the MGM Grand Garden Arena on Sunday, May 17, 2015, in Las Vegas. (Photo by Eric Jamison/Invision/AP)
Ed Sheeran opted for his normal look -- white shirt, black tie, black pants, and kicks, for his evening out. (Photo by Larry Busacca/BMA2015/Getty Images for dcp)
Kylie Jenner showed off her famous fashion sense in a futuristic striped dress with lace-up booties. She finished off the look with a bold gold belt. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
We're normally impressed with Hailee Steinfeld's fashion sense, but this ill-fitting frock and sock look is not one of our favorites. What do you think? (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
Zendaya took her fashion game to a new level with a wild, printed pant and crop-top combo, which she paired with an oversized blazer. The fun look, which showed off her tight abs, also displayed her fun and funky fashion sense. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
"Jealous" singer Nick Jonas opted for a pop of color and hit the red carpet in an eggplant-colored suit. Jonas cuddled up to his gorgeous girlfriend, Olivia Culpo, who looked stunning a tiny, black jumpsuit. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
Lookin' good! DJ Calvin Harris showed off his style sense in a slim-fit navy suit. (Photo by Steve Granitz/WireImage)
Molly Ringwald looked lovely in  black jumpsuit with a sexy neckline. She topped off the sexy yet classy style with a gold clutch and a pop of color on her lips. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
Little Big Town singer Karen Fairchild showed off her wild side in a black leather dress and over-the-knee heels. We can't say we're in love with the daring style. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
Ludacris, who is set to host the award show, looked dapper in a tuxedo with a red pocket square. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)

Is David Lee Roth a new brand ambassador for Under Armour? The Van Halen hunk hit the red carpet in a bizarre plaid suit paired with a fitness top, sunglasses, a newsboy hat, and athletic shoes. We're officially confused. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)

Wowza! "Orange Is the New Black" star Laverne Cox looked better than ever in a white frock with metallic accents and a plunging neckline. (Photo by Eric Jamison/Invision/AP)
Rapper Wiz Khalifa went for a classy look with a metallic, striped suit and extremely white tennis shoes. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - MAY 17: (L-R) Musicians Philip Sweet, Kimberly Schlapman, Karen Fairchild, and Jimi Westbrook of Little Big Town attend the 2015 Billboard Music Awards at MGM Grand Garden Arena on May 17, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
Fifth Harmony's leading ladies -- Lauren Jauregui, Ally Brooke, Normani Hamilton, Dinah-Jane Hansen and Camila Cabello -- hit the red carpet in some fairly interesting white, gold and and black frocks. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/BMA2015/WireImage)

Mermaid maven! Actress Jennette McCurdy went for a sea-inspired look with a strapless dress that "The Little Mermaid" would have been impressed by. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)

Singer-songwriter Bonnie McKee showed off her taut tummy in a copy top and parachute pant combo (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
E! personality Giuliana Rancic put her best foot forward in a LBD that featured a thigh-high slit and several sparkly cutouts. She polished off the look with sleek tresses. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
"Empire" star Bryshere Y. Gray looked slick in a snakeskin print gray suit. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
Hot alert! Former "Wonder Years" star Danica McKellar showed off her incredible physique in a slinky, sparkly dress with a low back and a thigh-high slit. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
Simplicity was key for Charli XCX! The singer rocked a simple LBD, which she polished off with red lipstick and red nail polish.  (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
"Take Me to Church" singer Hozier looked rocker chic in a black suit and a simple navy button down. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - MAY 17: Actor Casper Smart attends the 2015 Billboard Music Awards at MGM Grand Garden Arena on May 17, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
Miss America 2015 Kira Kazantsev didn't exactly wow us with her futuristic nude and yellow dress and sky-high platform shows. Her frock seemed to overpower her tiny figure. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
Broadway babe and "Frozen" star Idina Menzel went for a basic LBD and huge platform heels for her night out at the award show. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
Estelle showed off her fit bod in a lacy gown with a plunging neckline and sheer panels. (Photo by Eric Jamison/Invision/AP)
Singer Tori Kelly hit the perfect balance between flirty, fun and sexy at the BBMAs in a fringed white frock. She amped up the fun style with big hair and metallic accents. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
Tracee Ellis Ross arrives at the Billboard Music Awards at the MGM Grand Garden Arena on Sunday, May 17, 2015, in Las Vegas. (Photo by Eric Jamison/Invision/AP)
Kimberly Schlapman of Little Big Town packed a punch with a bright blue gown and pink accessories. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images)
Musicians Patrick Stump, Joe Trohman, Pete Wentz and Andy Hurley of Fall Out Boy were some of the best-dressed gents at the awards show in a series of tuxes and skinny ties. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/BMA2015/FilmMagic)
Las Vegas icon Wayne Newton doesn't seem to have aged a day and hit the red carpet in his signature leather shirt. (Photo by Steve Granitz/WireImage)
Olivia Culpo looked equal parts sweet and sexy in a sparkly, black jumpsuit. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/BMA2015/WireImage)
Model Martha Hunt added a punch of color to the event in a fuchsia frock. (Photo by Kevin Mazur/BMA2015/WireImage)
LAS VEGAS, NV - MAY 17: Recording artist John Legend (L) and singer/songwriter Meghan Trainor perform during the 2015 Billboard Music Awards at MGM Grand Garden Arena on May 17, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - MAY 17: Recording artist John Legend (L) and singer/songwriter Meghan Trainor perform during the 2015 Billboard Music Awards at MGM Grand Garden Arena on May 17, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
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5. Former NFL linebacker Adrian Robinson died Saturday night at the age of 25, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer. Read more here.

6. 35 years ago today, a 5.1 earthquake triggered the eruption of Mount St. Helens, located in southwest Washington state. 57 people lost their lives, and it is now a world-class outdoor laboratory for the study of volcanoes. Read more here.

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Mount St. Helens' eruption 35 years ago
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What to know this morning: In 5 minutes or less
An eruption column rises from Mount St. Helens, Washington, 22nd July 1980. This was one of a series of explosive eruptions by the volcano in 1980, the most destructve occurring on 18th May and causing the entire north face (nearest camera) to slide away. In the background (right) is the stratovolcano Mount Hood, Oregon. (Photo by Max Gutierrez/Bride Lane Library/Popperfoto/Getty Images)
360998 18: A helicopter hovers over a cloud of ash May 23, 1980 in Washington State. On May 18, 1980, an earthquake caused a landslide on Mount St. Helens'' north face, taking off the top of the mountain and triggering an eruption that killed 57 people, wiped out river valleys and destroyed enough trees to build 300,000 homes. (Photo by John Barr/Liaison)
360998 20: Ash covers a pickup truck May 23, 1980 in Washington State. On May 18, 1980, an earthquake caused a landslide on Mount St. Helens'' north face, taking off the top of the mountain and triggering an eruption that killed 57 people, wiped out river valleys and destroyed enough trees to build 300,000 homes. (Photo by John Barr/Liaison)
360998 21: A cloud of ash covers a mountaintop May 23, 1980 in Washington State. On May 18, 1980, an earthquake caused a landslide on Mount St. Helens'' north face, taking off the top of the mountain and triggering an eruption that killed 57 people, wiped out river valleys and destroyed enough trees to build 300,000 homes. (Photo by John Barr/Liaison)
360998 17: Ash covers the landscape May 23, 1980 in Washington State. On May 18, 1980, an earthquake caused a landslide on Mount St. Helens'' north face, taking off the top of the mountain and triggering an eruption that killed 57 people, wiped out river valleys and destroyed enough trees to build 300,000 homes. (Photo by John Barr/Liaison)
360998 14: A cloud of ash covers a mountaintop May 23, 1980 in Washington State. On May 18, 1980, an earthquake caused a landslide on Mount St. Helens'' north face, taking off the top of the mountain and triggering an eruption that killed 57 people, wiped out river valleys and destroyed enough trees to build 300,000 homes. (Photo by John Barr/Liaison)
360998 10: Ash covers a pickup truck May 23, 1980 in Washington State. On May 18, 1980, an earthquake caused a landslide on Mount St. Helens'' north face, taking off the top of the mountain and triggering an eruption that killed 57 people, wiped out river valleys and destroyed enough trees to build 300,000 homes. (Photo by John Barr/Liaison)
360998 30: Ash and mud surrounds trees May 23, 1980 in Washington State. On May 18, 1980, an earthquake caused a landslide on Mount St. Helens'' north face, taking off the top of the mountain and triggering an eruption that killed 57 people, wiped out river valleys and destroyed enough trees to build 300,000 homes. (Photo by John Barr/Liaison)
360998 28: A cloud of ash covers landscape May 23, 1980 in Washington State. On May 18, 1980, an earthquake caused a landslide on Mount St. Helens'' north face, taking off the top of the mountain and triggering an eruption that killed 57 people, wiped out river valleys and destroyed enough trees to build 300,000 homes. (Photo by John Barr/Liaison)
360995 08: A cloud of ash covers a mountaintop May 22, 1980 in Washington State. On May 18, 1980, an earthquake caused a landslide on Mount St. Helens'' north face, taking off the top of the mountain and triggering an eruption that killed 57 people, wiped out river valleys and destroyed enough trees to build 300,000 homes. (Photo by John Barr/Liaison)
360995 11: A cloud of ash covers a mountaintop May 22, 1980 in Washington State. On May 18, 1980, an earthquake caused a landslide on Mount St. Helens'' north face, taking off the top of the mountain and triggering an eruption that killed 57 people, wiped out river valleys and destroyed enough trees to build 300,000 homes. (Photo by John Barr/Liaison)
360995 04: A cloud of ash covers a mountaintop May 22, 1980 in Washington State. On May 18, 1980, an earthquake caused a landslide on Mount St. Helens'' north face, taking off the top of the mountain and triggering an eruption that killed 57 people, wiped out river valleys and destroyed enough trees to build 300,000 homes. (Photo by John Barr/Liaison)
360995 12: A cloud of ash covers a mountaintop May 22, 1980 in Washington State. On May 18, 1980, an earthquake caused a landslide on Mount St. Helens'' north face, taking off the top of the mountain and triggering an eruption that killed 57 people, wiped out river valleys and destroyed enough trees to build 300,000 homes. (Photo by John Barr/Liaison)
360998 29: A mudslide covers a road May 23, 1980 in Washington State. On May 18, 1980, an earthquake caused a landslide on Mount St. Helens'' north face, taking off the top of the mountain and triggering an eruption that killed 57 people, wiped out river valleys and destroyed enough trees to build 300,000 homes. (Photo by John Barr/Liaison)
360995 05: A cloud of ash covers a mountaintop May 22, 1980 in Washington State. On May 18, 1980, an earthquake caused a landslide on Mount St. Helens'' north face, taking off the top of the mountain and triggering an eruption that killed 57 people, wiped out river valleys and destroyed enough trees to build 300,000 homes. (Photo by John Barr/Liaison)
360995 03: A cloud of ash covers a mountaintop May 22, 1980 in Washington State. On May 18, 1980, an earthquake caused a landslide on Mount St. Helens'' north face, taking off the top of the mountain and triggering an eruption that killed 57 people, wiped out river valleys and destroyed enough trees to build 300,000 homes. (Photo by John Barr/Liaison)
In 1980, a major volcanic eruption occurred at Mount St Helens, a volcano located in state of Washington, in the United States. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty images)
True colour satellite image of Mount St-Helens, an active vulcanoe (2250m high) in Washington State, US. Image taken on 29 July 1972, before its catastrophic eruption of 1980, using LANDSAT data., Mount St Helens, Washington State, Us, In 1972, True Colour Satellite Image (Photo by Planet Observer/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)
In 1980, a major volcanic eruption occurred at Mount St Helens, a volcano located in state of Washington, in the United States. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty images)
Golden shovels are shown Tuesday, May 18, 2010, near Mount St. Helens, prior to the ground-breaking for a new outdoor amphitheater at the Johnston Ridge Observatory, on the 30th anniversary of the volcano's violent May 18, 1980 eruption in Washington state. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
**ADVANCE FOR WEEKEND, MAY 14-15 ** Crosses commemorating Ed and Eleanor Murphy, who were killed in the massive Mount St. Helens eruption nearly 25 years ago, are decorated with flowers as they stand in the forest approximately 11 miles west of the active volcano in Washington state, May 5, 2005. Of the 57 people known to have lost their lives on the mountain May 18, 1980, only three are known to have been killed within the "red zone," the area cordoned off by officials in the weeks leading up to the eruption. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
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