U.S. experiencing a record-breaking hurricane 'drought'

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
U.S. Experiencing A Record-Breaking Hurricane 'Drought'

The U.S. is currently experiencing a weather phenomenon that researchers have recently estimated occurs only every 177 years.

The country has not borne the brunt of a serious hurricane with a minimum rating of Category 3 in nine years -- the longest drought-like lull since 1850 when consistent record-keeping began.

The last serious hurricane that met this criterion was in October 2005 when Hurricane Wilma hit Florida with wind gusts of up to 120 miles per hour, causing more than $29 billion in damage.

NASA satellite hurricane photos from space
See Gallery
U.S. experiencing a record-breaking hurricane 'drought'
AT SEA - OCTOBER 28: In this handout satellite image provided by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Hurricane Sandy, pictured at 00:15 UTC, churns off the east coast on October 28, 2012 in the Atlantic Ocean. Sandy which has already claimed over 50 lives in the Caribbean is predicted to bring heavy winds and floodwaters to the mid-atlantic region. (Photo by NASA via Getty Images)

Hurricane Sandy at night, from space

Photo: NASA/Flickr

Hurricane Irene as Seen from Space

Photo: NASA/Flickr

IN SPACE - SEPTEMBER 11: In this handout satellite image provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), hurricane Humberto (R) forms as a category one on September 11, 2013 in the far eastern Atlantic Ocean. Humberto is the first hurricane of the 2013 season. (Photo by NOAA/NASA GOES Project via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JULY 3: In this handout provided by the NASA, Hurricane Arthur is seen from the International Space Staion as it moves up the U.S. East Coast on July 3, 2014. According to reports, Arthur will continue to strengthen and will reach a category two in strength prior to landfall as early as the evening on July 3. (Photo by NASA via Getty Images)
CARIBBEAN SEA - AUGUST 24: In this handout MODIS satellite image provided by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Hurricane Irene (top center) churns over the Bahamas on August 24, 2011 in the Caribbean Sea. Irene, now a Category 3 storm with winds of 120 miles per hour, is projected to possibly clip the Outer Banks region of North Carolina before moving up the eastern seaboard of the U.S. (Photo by NASA via Getty Images)

Hurricane Irene Makes Landfall in North Carolina

Photo: NASA/Flickr

Hurricane Irene

Photo: NASA/Flickr

Hurricane Katrina

Photo: NASA/Flickr

NASA's Terra Satellite Shows a Larger Hurricane Sandy Over Bahamas

Photo: NASA/Flickr

IN SPACE - SEPTEMBER 10: In this handout image provided by NASA, Hurricane Ike is seen on September 10, 2008 from aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The center of the hurricane was near 23.8 degrees north latitude and 85.3 degrees west longitude, moving 300 degrees at 7 nautical miles per hour. The sustained winds were 80 nautical miles per hour with gusts to 100 nautical miles per hour and forecast to intensify, according to NASA. The eye of the hurricane is expected to make landfall at Galveston Island early Saturday (13 September 2008) morning. (Photo by NASA via Getty Images)

Archive: South Pacific Storm (NASA, Skylab, 12/02/73)

Photo: NASA/Flickr

UNITED STATES - JANUARY 17: This photo of Hurricane Frances was taken by NASA ISS Science Officer and Flight Engineer Mike Fincke aboard the International Space Station as he flew 230 miles above the storm at about 10 am EDT Friday, 27 August 2004. At the time, Frances was about 820 miles east of the Lesser Antilles in the Atlantic Ocean, moving west-northwest at 10 miles an hour, with maximum sustained winds of 105 miles an hour. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)

Hurricane Dean photographed from Shuttle Endeavour [1680x1050]

Photo: NASA/Flickr

Hurricane Danielle (NASA, International Space Station Science, 08/27/10) [Explored]

Photo: NASA/Flickr


This current record trumps an eight year-long interval that occurred from 1861 to 1868.

These statistics are based on the work of members from NASA and a reinsurance firm.

Because the most comprehensive hurricane records are only available from the last 65 years, they used weather predictor models to simulate about 63,000 years' worth of activity based on data from 1950 to 2012.

They ultimately concluded that this streak is more luck than an indication of change in hurricanes at a macro level.

Also on AOL:
Survey: School bullying at lowest ebb in 10 years
Violent storms to threaten 1,200-Mile swath of Central US Saturday
Research may shed light on link between 'Suicide Belt' and elevation

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

People are Reading