Tulsa County sheriff's office spokesman placed on leave

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Major Clark On Admin Leave

TULSA, Okla. (AP) -- The Tulsa County sheriff placed the agency's spokesman on administrative leave Monday following last month's fatal shooting of a restrained man by a volunteer deputy.

Sheriff Stanley Glanz announced in a statement that Maj. Shannon Clark is on administrative leave, with pay, pending a performance evaluation. The move follows the April 2 shooting of Eric Harris by reserve deputy Robert Bates.

Glanz didn't say why Clark was put on leave and didn't respond to a request for comment by The Associated Press. Glanz said in the statement that Terry Simonson, the intergovernmental affairs and contract administrator for the agency, would be handling public information. Calls to Simonson seeking comment were not returned.

Clark didn't return a phone call seeking comment but said in a text message that he didn't know why he was put on leave. "I'm in the dark on this one," he wrote.

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Tulsa Oklahoma man Eric Courtney Harris shot by reserve officer - Robert Bates
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Tulsa County sheriff's office spokesman placed on leave
Robert Bates, a former Oklahoma volunteer sheriff's deputy who said he mistook his handgun for his stun gun when he fatally shot an unarmed suspect in 2015, is escorted from the courtroom following his sentencing at the courthouse in Tulsa, Okla., Tuesday, May 31, 2016. Bates, who was convicted of second-degree manslaughter, was sentenced to four years. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Aidan Fraley, center, the son of Eric Harris, an unarmed suspect who was shot and killed by Robert Bates, a former Oklahoma volunteer sheriff's deputy, talks to the media following the sentencing for Bates, at the courthouse in Tulsa, Okla., Tuesday, May 31, 2016. Bates, who was convicted of second-degree manslaughter, was sentenced to four years in prison. At left is Aidan Fraley's mother, Cathy Fraley. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Eric Courtney Harris

Image courtesy: Tulsa County Sheriff's Office

Robert Bates, a former Oklahoma volunteer sheriffâs deputy who said he mistook his handgun for his stun gun when he fatally shot an unarmed suspect last year, is escorted from the courtroom following his sentencing at the courthouse in Tulsa, Okla., Tuesday, May 31, 2016. Bates, who was convicted of second-degree manslaughter, was sentenced to four years. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Robert Bates, a former Oklahoma volunteer sheriff's deputy who said he mistook his handgun for his stun gun when he fatally shot an unarmed suspect last year, is escorted to the courtroom for his sentencing at the courthouse in Tulsa, Okla., Tuesday, May 31, 2016. Bates was convicted of second-degree manslaughter. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Clark Brewster, defense attorney for Robert Bates, a former Oklahoma volunteer sheriff's deputy who said he mistook his handgun for his stun gun when he fatally shot an unarmed suspect last year, talks with the media following sentencing for Bates at the courthouse in Tulsa, Okla., Tuesday, May 31, 2016. Bates, who was convicted of second-degree manslaughter, was sentenced to four years in prison. Brewster said they are planning an appeal. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Robert Bates, a former Oklahoma volunteer sheriff's deputy who said he mistook his handgun for his stun gun when he fatally shot an unarmed suspect last year, blows a kiss to family members as he is escorted to the courtroom for his sentencing at the courthouse in Tulsa, Okla., Tuesday, May 31, 2016. Bates was convicted of second-degree manslaughter. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Robert Bates, a former Oklahoma volunteer sheriff's deputy who said he mistook his handgun for his stun gun when he fatally shot an unarmed suspect last year, arrives for his sentencing at the courthouse in Tulsa, Okla., Tuesday, May 31, 2016. Bates was convicted of second-degree manslaughter. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
FILE - This Tuesday, April 14, 2015 file photo provided by the Tulsa County, Okla., Sheriff's Office shows Robert Bates. Bates, a former Oklahoma volunteer sheriff's deputy who says he mistook his handgun for his stun gun when he fatally shot an unarmed suspect has been convicted of second-degree manslaughter. Jurors announced the verdict Wednesday, April 27, 2016 in the case. The insurance executive fatally shot Eric Harris while working with Tulsa County sheriff's deputies last year. Harris was restrained and unarmed at the time. (Tulsa County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
Aidan Fraley, center, the son of Eric Harris, an unarmed suspect who was shot and killed by Robert Bates, a former Oklahoma volunteer sheriff's deputy, talks to the media following the sentencing for Bates at the courthouse in Tulsa, Okla., Tuesday, May 31, 2016. Bates, who was convicted of second-degree manslaughter, was sentenced to four years in prison. At left is Aidan Fraley's mother, Cathy Fraley. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
In this screen shot from April 2, 2015 video provided by the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office, police restrain 44-year-old Eric Harris after he was chased down and tackled by a Tulsa County Deputy, and then shot by a reserve sheriff's deputy while in custody, in Tulsa, Okla. The sheriff's office said 73-year-old reserve deputy Robert Charles Bates fired the shot that killed Harris, believing he was using his stun gun instead of his service weapon when he opened fire. (AP Photo/Tulsa County Sheriff's Office)
CLEET Executive Director Steve Emmons, left, speaks during a news conference in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, April 29, 2015. A bill in the Oklahoma Senate would increase from 240 to 300 hours the amount of training a reserve officer must receive. Reserve officer training requirements have come under scrutiny after volunteer deputy Robert Bates drew his firearm instead of a stun gun and shot a suspect who was being held down during an April 2 undercover sting in Tulsa. Looking on are state Sen. Ralph Shortey, center, R-Oklahoma City and state Rep. Anastasia Pittman, D-Oklahoma City. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel speaks at a news conference in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, April 29, 2015. A bill in the Oklahoma Senate would increase from 240 to 300 hours the amount of training a reserve officer must receive. Reserve officer training requirements have come under scrutiny after volunteer deputy Robert Bates drew his firearm instead of a stun gun and shot a suspect who was being held down during an April 2 undercover sting in Tulsa. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Oklahoma state Rep. John Bennett, left, R-Sallisaw, speaks at a news conference in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, April 29, 2015. A bill in the Oklahoma Senate would increase from 240 to 300 hours the amount of training a reserve officer must receive. Reserve officer training requirements have come under scrutiny after volunteer deputy Robert Bates drew his firearm instead of a stun gun and shot a suspect who was being held down during an April 2 undercover sting in Tulsa. From left are Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel, Bennett, state Sen. Ralph Shortey, state Rep. Anastasia Pittman, and state Rep. Mike Christian. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Oklahoma state Rep. Johnny Tadlock, D-Idabel, speaks at a news conference in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, April 29, 2015. Prior to running for the House, Tadlock served as county sheriff. A bill in the Oklahoma Senate would increase from 240 to 300 hours the amount of training a reserve officer must receive. . Reserve officer training requirements have come under scrutiny after volunteer deputy Robert Bates drew his firearm instead of a stun gun and shot a suspect who was being held down during an April 2 undercover sting in Tulsa. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Oklahoma state Rep. Anastasia Pittman, D-Oklahoma City, speaks at a news conference in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, April 29, 2015. A bill in the Oklahoma Senate would increase from 240 to 300 hours the amount of training a reserve officer must receive. Reserve officer training requirements have come under scrutiny after volunteer deputy Robert Bates drew his firearm instead of a stun gun and shot a suspect who was being held down during an April 2 undercover sting in Tulsa. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
CLEET Executive Director Steve Emmons speaks during a news conference in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, April 29, 2015. A bill in the Oklahoma Senate would increase from 240 to 300 hours the amount of training a reserve officer must receive. Reserve officer training requirements have come under scrutiny after volunteer deputy Robert Bates drew his firearm instead of a stun gun and shot a suspect who was being held down during an April 2 undercover sting in Tulsa. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Robert Bates, left, leaves his arraignment with his daughter, Leslie McCreary, right, in Tulsa, Okla., Tuesday, April 21, 2015. Bates, a 73-year-old Tulsa County reserve deputy who fatally shot a suspect who was pinned down by officers, pleaded not guilty to a second-degree manslaughter charge. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
This Tuesday, April 14, 2015 photo provided by the Tulsa County, Oklahoma, Sheriff's Office shows Robert Bates. The 73-year-old Oklahoma reserve sheriff's deputy, who authorities said fatally shot a suspect after confusing his stun gun and handgun, was booked into the county jail Tuesday on a manslaughter charge. Bates surrendered to the Tulsa County Jail and was released after posting $25,000 bond. (Tulsa County Sheriff's Office via AP)
In this photo provided by the Tulsa County, Oklahoma, Sheriff's Office is Tulsa County reserve deputy Robert Bates. Police say Bates, a 73-year-old white reserve deputy, thought he was holding a stun gun, not his handgun, when he fired at 44-year-old Eric Harris in an April 2 incident. Harris, who is black, was treated by medics at the scene and died in a Tulsa hospital. (Tulsa County Sheriff's Office via AP)
A white reserve sheriff's deputy thought he was holding a stun gun, not his handgun, when he fatally shot a black suspect during an arrest that was caught on video in Tulsa, Oklahoma, police said.
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In April, Clark denied the existence of a 2009 memo in which employees detailed concerns about Bates' training. The memo was later released by an attorney representing the Harris' family.

Bates, 73, is a friend of Glanz who has donated tens of thousands of dollars in cash and equipment to the sheriff's office. Bates is charged with second-degree manslaughter in Harris' shooting death.

Glanz, who first took office in 1989, has declined repeated interview requests from the AP, including after Monday's county commissioners meeting, where he reiterated to reporters that he would not step down. He also has said he won't seek re-election next year.

Last month, Tim Albin, the second-ranking official in the sheriff's office, resigned after a leaked internal investigation showed he pressured subordinates to ignore Bates' training deficiencies.

After the release of the internal memos from 2009, Glanz ordered that reserve deputies could no longer patrol alone and that his office would temporarily limit its 126 reserve deputies while it audits their training records.

A local civil rights group is petitioning for a grand jury to investigate whether Glanz neglected his duties and whether reservists who gave gifts to Glanz were given special treatment. The group We the People Oklahoma has 45 days to collect 5,000 signatures from county voters to authorize an order impaneling the jury.

Group organizer Marq Lewis estimated Monday that volunteers have collected about 1,000 signatures so far.

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