Pacquiao deserves punishment heading his way

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Manny Pacquiao Sued for Not Disclosing Shoulder Injury Prior to Fight

College Contributor Network

The world built it up to be good versus evil.

The big bad Floyd Mayweather, who so often flaunts his "Money Team" brand, much to the dismay of the casual boxing fan, who complains about his style of fighting without appreciating the brilliance behind his approach.

Then there was Manny Pacquiao. The lovable lefty from the Philippines whose country came to a halt to watch their national hero fight.

When the two stepped into the ring on Derby day we saw something so rare that the last instance does not immediately come to mind. The majority of Americans were rooting against a fellow countryman where their was a foreign opponent involved.

The American Mayweather was peppered with boos from the MGM Grand crowd when heading to the ring with Justin Bieber and the Burger King by his side, an endorsement which reportedly paid the welterweight champion north of $1 million.

The Filipino Pacquiao entered to a hero's welcome with Jimmy Kimmel part of the entourage, fully capturing the lighthearted nature of his camp throughout the process.

After Mayweather (48-0, 26 KO) won via unanimous decision, in which Pacquiao looked relatively lifeless for the last six rounds of the fight, is when the drama really picked up. Pacquiao, who fell to 57-6-2, revealed he was fighting with an injured shoulder, in what turned out to be a "significant tear" in his rotator cuff for which he had surgery on Wednesday.

Still, he allowed the fight to go on.

When asked a couple days before the fight if he had an injuries that he needed treatment for, a common occurrence in the sport of boxing, he said nothing.

Despite hundreds of thousands of hard working people dishing out $100 to watch the fight, he said nothing.

The day of the fight when Pacquiao finally asked for an anti-inflammatory shot it was denied, and rightfully so.

Yet, the congressman and musician happily accepted his payday exceeding $100 million dollars. With lawsuits flying in by the dozens, Pacquiao deserves whatever punishment comes his way.

At the end of the day, greed clouded the usually selfless Pacquiao. The payday was more important than giving the fight the fans who have waited six years for the bout deserved. He knew fully well that he could not fight up to his ability, yet the power of the all-mighty dollar got the best of the "good guy" -- disappointing viewers and frustrating gamblers who took a risk on Pacquiao.

It blinded him, and it ultimately not only diminished the fight of the century, for many, it ruined the sport of boxing for them.

The door has already been opened to a potential rematch between the two future Hall of Famers. Mayweather and Bob Arum, the CEO of Top Rank who represents Pacquiao have already talked about it less than a week after the fight ended. If it happens, more records will be broken, even more pay-per-views bought, and another spectacle that will take the world by storm will ensue the first weekend of May.

It will all conveniently work out for Pacquiao. No one will expect him to win fresh off a surgery that will sideline him a minimum of nine months, he'll be a "hero" even getting back in the ring again and giving it another go-round.

Yet, what people should not forget is that for an already dying sport, Pacquiao just put one more nail in the coffin.

How can people expect to get behind a sport which has less credibility than the WWE at this point?

Pacquiao deciding to fight, giving a lackluster effort at best, was not only a letdown to the casual boxing fan, but more importantly a spit in the face to the sport's hardcore faithful, who have been craving a fight of this magnitude and importance for longer than the couple of months leading up to it.

For some, they've been waiting a lifetime for it.

A guy who so many looked up to, ultimately let the world down.

Joshua Brown is a Sports Correspondent for the Boston Globe is a color commentator for Northeastern University basketball and hockey and also writes for USCHO and College Hoops Daily. Follow him on twitter @josh_brown31
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