Governor lifts state of emergency for Baltimore

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Baltimore Mayor Wants Body Cameras on Police

BALTIMORE (AP) -- The mayor called on federal investigators Wednesday to look into whether this city's beleaguered police department uses a pattern of excessive force or discriminatory policing.

Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said even though complaints of excessive force and lawsuits alleging misconduct are down over the last few years, "we all know that Baltimore continues to have a fractured relationship between the police and the community."

Baltimore saw days of unrest after Freddie Gray, a black man, was taken into custody and suffered critical injuries. He died a week later. Protesters threw bottles and bricks at police during a riot on April 27, injuring nearly 100 officers. More than 200 people were arrested, and about 170 cars and 250 businesses were burned.

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Governor lifts state of emergency for Baltimore
Daniel H Smith demonstrates outside City Hall in Philadelphia on Thursday, April 30, 2015. The event in Philadelphia follows days of unrest in Baltimore amid Freddie Gray's police-custody death in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Protesters rush a police line after a rally at City Hall in Philadelphia on Thursday, April 30, 2015. The event in Philadelphia follows days of unrest in Baltimore amid Freddie Gray's police-custody death. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - APRIL 30: Micaiah Bakues-Freeman, 9, joins protestors demonstrating over the death of Freddy Gray outside City Hall on April 30, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Freddie Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - APRIL 30: Protestors march over the death of Freddy Gray on April 30, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Freddie Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - APRIL 30: Protestors march in demonstration over the death of Freddy Gray on April 30, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Freddie Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
Protesters clash with police in Philadelphia on Thursday, April 30, 2015. The event in Philadelphia follows days of unrest in Baltimore amid Freddie Gray's police-custody death. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - APRIL 30: Protestors linger in front of a large contingent of police officers after marching over the death of Freddy Gray on April 30, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Freddie Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
Protesters march after a rally at City Hall in Philadelphia on Thursday, April 30, 2015. The event in Philadelphia follows days of unrest in Baltimore amid Freddie Gray's police-custody death. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - APRIL 30: Protestors march over the death of Freddy Gray on April 30, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Freddie Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 29: A man takes part in a Solidarity Baltimore rally on April 29, 2015 in New York City. Baltimore, Maryland remains on edge in the wake of the death of Freddie Gray, though the city has been largely peaceful following a day of rioting this past Monday. Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 29: An NYPD Officer stands watch at a Solidarity Baltimore rally in Times Square on April 29, 2015 in New York City. Baltimore, Maryland remains on edge in the wake of the death of Freddie Gray, though the city has been largely peaceful following a day of rioting this past Monday. Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 29: A woman takes part in a Solidarity With City Of Baltimore rally at Union Square on April 29, 2015 in New York City. in Baltimore, Maryland remains on edge in the wake of the death of Freddie Gray, though the city has been largely peaceful following a day of rioting this past Monday. Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody. . (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
Protestors hold signs during a protest to support the rallies in Baltimore, in front of the White House, Wednesday, April 29, 2015 in Washington. Freddie Gray died from spinal injuries about a week after he was arrested and transported in a Baltimore police van. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
A person is arrested by police officers near Union Square, Wednesday, April 29, 2015, in New York. People gathered to protest the death of Freddie Gray, a Baltimore man who was critically injured in police custody. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
A man is carried by police officers as arrests are made at Union Square, Wednesday, April 29, 2015, in New York. People gathered to protest the death of Freddie Gray, a Baltimore man who was critically injured in police custody. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
Protesters march on the west side of Manhattan Wednesday, April 29, 2015, in New York. People gathered in several areas on New York to protest the death of Freddie Gray, a Baltimore man who was critically injured in police custody. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
Protesters move along as they are pushed off 42nd Street by police near Times Square Wednesday, April 29, 2015, in New York. People gathered in several areas of New York to protest the death of Freddie Gray, a Baltimore man who was critically injured in police custody. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
A person is arrested by police officers near Union Square, Wednesday, April 29, 2015, in New York. People gathered to protest the death of Freddie Gray, a Baltimore man who was critically injured in police custody. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 29: Demonstrators snarl traffic as they try to block an entrance to the Holland Tunnel during a solidarity protest of the death of Freddie Gray on April 29, 2015 in New York City. Baltimore, Maryland remains on edge in the wake of the death of Freddie Gray, though the city has been largely peaceful following a day of rioting this past Monday. Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police. (Photo by Michael Abbott/Getty Images)
Protesters slam their hands against a bus shelter as they chant Wednesday, April 29, 2015, in New York. People gathered to protest the death of Freddie Gray, a Baltimore man who was critically injured in police custody. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
New York, NY-April 29: New Yorkers protest the death of Baltimore, Maryland Police victim Freddie Gray in a show of solidarity in the Union Square section of New York City on April 29, 2015 in New York City. Credit: RTNJennings/MediaPunch/IPX
Protesters chant on 42nd Street Wednesday, April 29, 2015, in New York. Hundreds of people gathered in several areas on New York to protest the death of Freddie Gray, a Baltimore man who was critically injured in police custody. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
Protestors lay in the street to stage a die-in at Herald Square, Wednesday, April 29, 2015, in New York. Several hundred people gathered in New York on Wednesday to protest the death of Freddie Gray, a Baltimore man who was critically injured in police custody, and more than a dozen were arrested. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
Protesters yell out in Union Square Wednesday, April 29, 2015, in New York. People gathered to protest the death of Freddie Gray, a Baltimore man who was critically injured in police custody. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 29: A man gestures to a police officer during a Solidarity Baltimore rally on April 29, 2015 in New York City. Baltimore, Maryland remains on edge in the wake of the death of Freddie Gray, though the city has been largely peaceful following a day of rioting this past Monday. Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 29: An NYPD Officer keeps watch at a Solidarity Baltimore rally in Times Square on April 29, 2015 in New York City. Baltimore, Maryland remains on edge in the wake of the death of Freddie Gray, though the city has been largely peaceful following a day of rioting this past Monday. Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 29: A man takes part in a Solidarity Baltimore rally on April 29, 2015 in New York City. Baltimore, Maryland remains on edge in the wake of the death of Freddie Gray, though the city has been largely peaceful following a day of rioting this past Monday. Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody. (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 29: A woman takes part in a Solidarity With City Of Baltimore rally at Union Square on April 29, 2015 in New York City. in Baltimore, Maryland remains on edge in the wake of the death of Freddie Gray, though the city has been largely peaceful following a day of rioting this past Monday. Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Houses housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody. . (Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images)
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Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan declared a state of emergency and called in 3,000 National Guardsmen and 1,000 officers from around the state and country. Hogan rescinded the state of emergency Wednesday and said all of the troops and state police had been pulled out. He said $20 million from state's Rainy Day Fund will help pay for last week's response.

He said the federal investigation was "probably a step in the right direction."

The mayor's request came a day after new Attorney General Loretta Lynch visited the city and pledged to improve the police department, telling faith and community leaders "we're here to hold your hands and provide support."

Justice Department spokeswoman Dena Iverson said in a statement that Lynch had received the mayor's request and "is actively considering that option in light of what she heard from law enforcement, city officials, and community, faith and youth leaders."

At the White House, spokesman Josh Earnest said investigating would be up to Lynch, who is "certainly eminently qualified to make this decision" as a former federal prosecutor.

"She has a very good understanding of the way that those law enforcement and prosecutorial enterprises should conduct themselves," he said.

A Baltimore Police Department spokesman had no immediate response. An email and text message was not immediately returned.

At her news conference, the mayor also said officers would have body cameras by the end of the year.

The Justice Department is already investigating whether Gray's civil rights were violated, and six officers face charges in the arrest and death, ranging from assault to second-degree murder.

The new investigation the mayor called for is similar to one was done in Ferguson, Missouri, following the shooting of an unarmed, black 18-year-old man by a white police officer.

Such wide-ranging investigations look for patterns of discrimination within a police department. They can examine how officers use force and search and arrest suspects.

Baltimore City Council President Jack Young has been calling for such an investigation since October, his spokesman Lester Davis said.

"The only way we're going to get the kind of lasting and meaningful reforms that are going to produce results is through a full-scale civil-rights investigation," Davis said.

At the time the Ferguson inquiry was announced in September, it was described as part of a broader Justice Department effort to investigate troubled police departments and, when pervasive problems are found, direct changes to be made. The department said then it has investigated 20 police departments for a variety of systemic misconduct in the past five years, more than twice the number of cases opened in the previous five years.

The investigations can sometimes result in a settlement known as a consent decree, in which the department agrees to make specific changes, and an outside monitor is appointed to make sure the police force complies with the agreement.

The Justice Department reached a court-supervised agreement in 2012 with the New Orleans Police Department that required the agency to overhaul its policies and procedures for use of force, training, interrogations, searches and arrests, recruitment and supervision. In April, it issued a harshly critical report of the police department in Albuquerque, New Mexico, that faulted the agency for a pattern of excessive force and called for an overhaul of its internal affairs unit.

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