Space Money: The politics and science of NASA's budget

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Space Money: The Politics and Science of NASA's Budget


Congress' proposed 2016 NASA budget rebalancing is getting pushback before it even goes to markup, because it puts the majority of the agency's funds toward space exploration. Wait, what?

The House Science, Space, and Technology Committee submitted a bill last week that would rearrange NASA's 2016 budget to prioritize space exploration and spaceflight technology over the administration's other science and research efforts.

The universally Republican-sponsored bill was held up as responsible insurance that America will continue to lead the world in space exploration.

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video at top: NASA spacewalk 2015 - astronaut - ISS - space (for article #21148093) *cloned gallery!*
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Space Money: The politics and science of NASA's budget
In this image made from video provided by NASA, astronaut Terry Virts performs a spacewalk outside the International Space Station on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015. This is the second spacewalk in five days for Virts and Butch Wilmore. In all, three spacewalks are planned in just over a week to prepare the orbiting lab for future American crew capsules. (AP Photo/NASA)
Astronauts are ahead of schedule with hardware upgrades to the International Space Station, despite last week's spacesuit water leak scare.
In this image from NASA television astronaut Barry "Butch" Wilmore, left, and Terry Virts begin wiring the International Space Station in preparation for the arrival in July of the international docking port for the Boeing and Space-X commercial crew vehicles early Saturday morning Feb. 21, 2015 to (AP Photo/NASA-TV)
Science, Space, Nasa, Astronaut floating in orbit above the earth during spacewalk.(Photo by: Eye Ubiquitous/UIG via Getty Images)
In this image from NASA television astronaut Barry "Butch" Wilmore, upper left, and Terry Virts, center, begin their second spacewalk outside the International Space Station Wednesday Feb. 25, 2015. Wednesday's spacewalk is the second in five days for Butch Wilmore and Terry Virts. In all, three spacewalks are planned in just over a week to prepare the orbiting lab for future American crew capsules. (AP Photo/NASA-TV)
In this image from television astronaut Barry "Butch" Wilmore begins the spacewalk Saturday morning Feb. 21, 2015 to wire the International Space Station in preparation for the arrival in July of the international docking port for the Boeing and Space-X commercial crew vehicles. (AP Photo/NASA-TV)
In this image from television astronaut Barry "Butch" Wilmore begins the spacewalk Saturday morning Feb. 21, 2015 to wire the International Space Station in preparation for the arrival in July of the international docking port for the Boeing and Space-X commercial crew vehicles. (AP Photo/NASA-TV)
This frame grab image from a live NASA feed shows Russian astronauts Maxim Suraev and Alexander Samokutyaev during a spacewalk outside the International Space Station on Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014. The astronauts are performing maintenance, removing two antennas that are no longer needed, inspecting the outside of the Russian segment, collecting samples from windows and elsewhere to check for engine exhaust and other materials. (AP Photo/NASA)
IN SPACE - OCTOBER 7: (EDITORIAL USE ONLY) In this handout photo provided by the European Space Agency (ESA), German ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst takes a photo during his spacewalk, whilst aboard the International Space Station (ISS) on October 7, 2014 in Space. Gerst returned to earth on November 10, 2014 after spending six months on the International Space Station completing an extensive scientific programme, known as the 'Blue Dot' mission (after astronomer Carl Sagan's description of Earth, as seen on a photograph taken by the Voyager probe from six billion kilometres away). (Photo by Alexander Gerst / ESA via Getty Images)
IN SPACE - OCTOBER 31: (EDITORIAL USE ONLY) In this handout photo provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) on October 31, 2014, German ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst took this image of a NASA spacesuit stored in the Quest airlock waiting for an astronaut to wear it for a spacewalk whilst aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Gerst returned to earth on November 10, 2014 after spending six months on the International Space Station completing an extensive scientific programme, known as the 'Blue Dot' mission (after astronomer Carl Sagan's description of Earth, as seen on a photograph taken by the Voyager probe from six billion kilometres away). (Photo by Alexander Gerst / ESA via Getty Images)
IN SPACE - OCTOBER 7: (EDITORIAL USE ONLY) In this handout photo provided by the European Space Agency (ESA), German ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst takes a 'selfie' during his spacewalk, whilst aboard the International Space Station (ISS) on October 7, 2014 in Space. Gerst returned to earth on November 10, 2014 after spending six months on the International Space Station completing an extensive scientific programme, known as the 'Blue Dot' mission (after astronomer Carl Sagan's description of Earth, as seen on a photograph taken by the Voyager probe from six billion kilometres away). (Photo by Alexander Gerst / ESA via Getty Images)
IN SPACE - JULY 12: In this handout image provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), NASA astronaut Ronald Garan attached to the robotic arm Canadarm2 moves a failed ammonia pump module from a storage platform on the International Space Station to the cargo bay of the space shuttle Atlantis during a planned six-and-a-half-hour spacewalk July 12, 2011 in space. This is the 160th spacewalk devoted to station assembly and maintenance since construction began in 1998. Space shuttle Atlantis has embarked on a 12-day mission to the International Space Station where it will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts. This was the final mission of the space shuttle program, which began on April 12, 1981 with the launch of Colombia. (Photo by NASA via Getty Images)
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But the boosts to the exploration budget would come at the expense of NASA's wide-ranging earth sciences program.

NASA's 2016 budget would dedicate $1.947 billion of its total funds to the official study of earth. The version in Congress would chop that allotment down to $1.45 billion.

NASA would probably feel a 25 percent cut. Yes, it's a space agency, but it also works to understand our home planet. NASA currently operates a fleet of 20 Earth-facing satellites, which measure and study everything from ocean currents to rainfall to atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

Within the atmosphere, airborne science missions survey local climate features, such as earth's changing polar ice, and help develop technologies to implement in future space missions. (Video via NASA)

In a statement this week, NASA Administrator Charles Bolden decried the proposed "gutting" of these programs and warned the budget "threatens to set back generations worth of progress in better understanding our changing climate."

Ah, the magic words. Critics of the bill see this as a partisan political issue, some vehemently so. (Video via NASA)

At Slate's Bad Astronomy blog, Phil Plait writes: "Republicans in the House and Senate don't want NASA studying Earth, because they think (or say) that global warming isn't real, or isn't a problem, or whatever talking point they've been told to use this week."

"The best scientists in the world are all telling us that our activities are changing the climate," President Obama said in his 2015 State of the Union address. "And if we don't act forcefully we'll continue to see rising oceans; longer, hotter heat waves; dangerous droughts and floods."

A writer at the Los Angeles Times called the bill "a clear swipe at the study of climate change."

And in an op-ed at The Hill, Texas Democrat Eddie Bernice Johnson wrote, "It's hard to believe that in order to serve an ideological agenda, the majority is willing to slash the science that helps us have a better understanding of our home planet."

And any politically-driven changes, if that's what these are, can have significant effects on NASA's operations. The agency doesn't really have money just sitting around.

While NASA's actually set to receive more funding than it did this year, and more than it did in 2014, compared to the overall U.S. budget NASA's share is kind of pocket change.

According to numbers from the Office of Management and Budget, total U.S. outlays for 2016 are estimated at $3.99 trillion. NASA's request would earmark $18.529 billion, or 0.46 percent of the total. (Video via NASA)

Here's a silly metaphorical example: If you represent the budget in pounds of thrust instead of dollars, and make 2016 U.S. spending a Saturn V rocket coming off the pad at full boost, NASA's proportional share is approximately one of the two engines on a Lockheed Martin F22 fighter.

Not a lot, in other words. You can see how where it goes within NASA is a hot issue. A full House vote on the budget proposal is expected later this month.

This video includes images from NASA and the U.S. Air Force. Music by Planet Boelex & Mosaik / CC BY NC ND 3.0.

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