Woman finds 3.69-carat diamond in Arkansas' Crater of Diamonds State Park

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
Woman Finds 3.69-Carat Diamond In State Park


During a recent visit to Crater of Diamonds State Park in Arkansas, a lucky woman found a diamond approximately the size of a pinto bean.
Susie Clark was visiting the Crater of Diamonds State Park in Murfreesboro, Arkansas with her husband and had no clue that she'd walk out with a jaw-dropping find. She recalls saying to God at the time, "Are you going to bless me and let me find a diamond today?"

12 PHOTOS
Crater of diamonds state park
See Gallery
Woman finds 3.69-carat diamond in Arkansas' Crater of Diamonds State Park
This June 24, 2015 handout photo provided by the Crater of Diamonds State Park Bobbie Oskarson holds the 8.52-carat diamond she found at Arkansas' Crater of Diamonds State Park at Murfreesboro. Park officials said Friday that the gem found by Bobbie Oskarson of Longmont, Colorado, is the fifth largest diamond found since the park was established in 1972. The park does not provide an estimate of the diamond's potential value. (Crater of Diamonds State Park via AP)
This June 24, 2015 handout photo provided by the Crater of Diamonds State Park shows a 8.52-carat diamond alongside an Arkansas commemorative quarter that includes a symbol of Arkansas's diamond site on it. Park officials said Friday that the gem found by Bobbie Oskarson of Longmont, Colorado, is the fifth largest diamond found since the park was established in 1972. The park does not provide an estimate of the diamond's potential value. (Crater of Diamonds State Park via AP)
This June 24, 2015 handout photo provided by the Crater of Diamonds State Park Bobbie Oskarson holds the 8.52-carat diamond she found at Arkansas' Crater of Diamonds State Park at Murfreesboro. Park officials said Friday that the gem found by Bobbie Oskarson of Longmont, Colorado, is the fifth largest diamond found since the park was established in 1972. The park does not provide an estimate of the diamond's potential value. (Crater of Diamonds State Park via AP)
Brian, left, and Amber Green, right, of Ward, Arkansas, visits the Crater of Diamonds State Park with their 4-year-old daughter, Alexia. (Photo by Allen Holder/Kansas City Star/MCT via Getty Images)
Lucky fortune diamond hunters can find diamonds on or just below the surface at Crater of Diamonds State Park in Southwest Arkansas. (Photo by Allen Holder/Kansas City Star/MCT via Getty Images)
People look for diamonds in 100-degree heat Wednesday, July 10, 2002, at Crater of Diamonds State Park near Murfreesboro, Ark. The 37-acre dirt field that sits on the eroded top of a volcanic pipe, is the eighth-largest diamond deposit in the world. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston)
Veteran diamond hunter James Archer, 77, of Nashville, Ark., uses a knife to scrape gravel as he searches for diamonds Wednesday, July 10, 2002, at Crater of Diamonds State Park near Murfreesboro, Ark. Archer has found more than 2,000 of the gems, including a 5.25-carat diamond, in 33 years of searching. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston)
Crater of Diamonds State Park near Murfreesboro, Arkansas. (Photo by Michael Snell / Alamy)
Crater of Diamonds State Park near Murfreesboro, Arkansas. (Photo by Michael Snell / Alamy)
Crater of Diamonds State Park near Murfreesboro, Arkansas. (Photo by Michael Snell / Alamy)
A handful of real diamonds found at Crater of Diamonds State Park in southern Arkansas. (Photo by Michael Snell / Alamy)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION


Soon after, she came across the jewel, which is 3.69 carats. Clark believes it was divine intervention and named it "the Hallelujah Diamond."

CNN explains that visitors to the park get to keep what they find. CNN explains: "It's not clear how much the diamond is worth, and park officials aren't trained to appraise them, according to the park website. But Oklahoman Tara Clymer sold a 3.85-carat diamond she found at the park last year for $20,000."

Clark's gem is the 122nd diamond to be found at the site so far this year, and also the largest of 2015.

According to a park interpreter, the tear-dropped shaped diamond is "frosted white with a pearlescent, metallic shine."

For now, Clark plans to keep the diamond for herself.

More to see:
Stanford police search for graffiti vandals who painted swastikas on frat house
Thousands attend funeral for Freddie Gray in Baltimore
GoFundMe takes down page for bakery that refused same-sex couple

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners