Large protests across Brazil seek ouster of president

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
Brazil Braces for Nationwide Protests, as Groups Seeking Impeachment of President Hit Streets

SAO PAULO (AP) -- Tens of thousands of people took to the streets of Brazil on Sunday for anti-government demonstrations across the continent-sized country.

It was the second such day of protests in less than a month and comes as polls show Rousseff, four months into her second term, with historically low approval ratings amid a corruption scandal at the state-run oil company, Petrobras, as well as a spluttering economy, a rapidly depreciating currency and political infighting.

35 PHOTOS
Brazail protests for president ouster (used in article #21171278)
See Gallery
Large protests across Brazil seek ouster of president
A demonstrator takes part in a protest against the government of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff at Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on April 12, 2015. Tens of thousands of Brazilians took to the streets Sunday, venting anger over government corruption and economic drift just one month after widespread protests drew more than a million people. AFP PHOTO / YASUYOSHI CHIBA (Photo credit should read YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators shout anti-government slogans during a march demanding the impeachment of Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Sunday, April 12, 2015. The protest movement has been organized, mostly via social media, by a motley assortment of groups. Most call for Rousseff’s impeachment, but they are joined by others with demands ranging from looser gun control laws to a military coup. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)
People march during an anti-government protest at Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Sunday, April 12, 2015. Anti-government demonstrators began streaming into the streets of cities throughout Brazil on Sunday to demand the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
A woman bangs a pan during a protest against Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff in Porto Alegre, Brazil on April 12, 2015. Tens of thousands of Brazilians turned out for demonstrations Sundays to oppose leftist president Dilma Rousseff, a target of rising discontent amid a faltering economy and a massive corruption scandal at state oil giant Petrobras. AFP PHOTO / Jefferson BERNARDES (Photo credit should read JEFFERSON BERNARDES/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators hold signs during a protest in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Sunday, April 12, 2015. Brazilians took to the streets for the second time in a month to protest the country's biggest corruption scandal and government austerity measures aimed at preserving the nation's investment grade rating. Photographer: Dado Galdieri/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A demonstrator holds a Brazilian flag during a protest in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Sunday, April 12, 2015. Brazilians took to the streets for the second time in a month to protest the country's biggest corruption scandal and government austerity measures aimed at preserving the nation's investment grade rating. Photographer: Dado Galdieri/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Demonstrators gather on Copacabana beach during a protest in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Sunday, April 12, 2015. Brazilians took to the streets for the second time in a month to protest the country's biggest corruption scandal and government austerity measures aimed at preserving the nation's investment grade rating. Photographer: Dado Galdieri/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Demonstrators gather on Copacabana beach during a protest in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Sunday, April 12, 2015. Brazilians took to the streets for the second time in a month to protest the country's biggest corruption scandal and government austerity measures aimed at preserving the nation's investment grade rating. Photographer: Dado Galdieri/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Demonstrators gather on Copacabana beach during a protest in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Sunday, April 12, 2015. Brazilians took to the streets for the second time in a month to protest the country's biggest corruption scandal and government austerity measures aimed at preserving the nation's investment grade rating. Photographer: Dado Galdieri/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A dummy wearing a mask depicting Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff as a devil is seen with a sign reading 'Impeachment now! PT out, Dilma out, Lula out and take the rats with you. CorruPTs' referring to the Workers Party (PT) during a protest in Porto Alegre, Brazil on April 12, 2015. Tens of thousands of Brazilians turned out for demonstrations Sundays to oppose leftist president Dilma Rousseff, a target of rising discontent amid a faltering economy and a massive corruption scandal at state oil giant Petrobras. AFP PHOTO / Jefferson BERNARDES (Photo credit should read JEFFERSON BERNARDES/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators protest against the government of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff in Porto Alegre, Brazil on April 12, 2015. Tens of thousands of Brazilians turned out for demonstrations Sundays to oppose leftist president Dilma Rousseff, a target of rising discontent amid a faltering economy and a massive corruption scandal at state oil giant Petrobras. AFP PHOTO / Jefferson BERNARDES (Photo credit should read JEFFERSON BERNARDES/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators hold letters reading 'Dilma out' during a protest against the government of president Dilma Rousseff along Paulista Avenue in Sao Paulo Brazil on 12 April 2015. Thousands of demonstrators clad in the yellow-green national colours protested Sunday in several cities of Brazil against president Dilma Rousseff who is facing a complex economic panorama and a political corruption scandal. AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators protest against the government of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff (depicted on flag) at Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on April 12, 2015. Tens of thousands of Brazilians took to the streets Sunday, venting anger over government corruption and economic drift just one month after widespread protests drew more than a million people. AFP PHOTO / YASUYOSHI CHIBA (Photo credit should read YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)
A man holds a banner reading 'Clear of PT rats' with the portraits of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff and former Brazilian President (2003-2011) Luiz Inacio Lula Da Silva during a protest against the ruling Workers Party (PT) at Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on April 12, 2015. Tens of thousands of Brazilians took to the streets Sunday, venting anger over government corruption and economic drift just one month after widespread protests drew more than a million people. AFP PHOTO / YASUYOSHI CHIBA (Photo credit should read YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)
A man disguised as Batman runs towards police officers as they detained a demonstrator during a protest against the government of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff and her Workers Party at Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on April 12, 2015. Tens of thousands of Brazilians took to the streets Sunday, venting anger over government corruption and economic drift just one month after widespread protests drew more than a million people. AFP PHOTO / YASUYOSHI CHIBA (Photo credit should read YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)
T-shirts reading 'Resign now! for the sake of Brazil' are displayed for sale during a protest against the government of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff at Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on April 12, 2015. Tens of thousands of Brazilians took to the streets Sunday, venting anger over government corruption and economic drift just one month after widespread protests drew more than a million people. AFP PHOTO / YASUYOSHI CHIBA (Photo credit should read YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)
A pregnant demonstrator takes part in a protest against the government of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff next to a sign reading 'Dilma, Lula, PT out' at Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on April 12, 2015. Tens of thousands of Brazilians took to the streets Sunday, venting anger over government corruption and economic drift just one month after widespread protests drew more than a million people. AFP PHOTO / YASUYOSHI CHIBA (Photo credit should read YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators rally to protest against the government of president Dilma Rousseff at Paulista Avenue in Sao Paulo, Brazil on April 12, 2015. Tens of thousands of Brazilians took to the streets Sunday, venting anger over government corruption and economic drift just one month after widespread protests drew more than a million people AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
A man disguised as US singer Elvis Presley (C) holds a placard during a protest against the government of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff at Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on April 12, 2015. Tens of thousands of Brazilians took to the streets Sunday, venting anger over government corruption and economic drift just one month after widespread protests drew more than a million people. AFP PHOTO / YASUYOSHI CHIBA (Photo credit should read YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)
Aerial view of demonstrators during a protest against the government of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff along Paulista Avenue in Sao Paulo, Brazil on April 12, 2015. Tens of thousands of Brazilians took to the streets Sunday, venting anger over government corruption and economic drift just one month after widespread protests drew more than a million people. AFP PHOTO / Miguel SCHINCARIOL (Photo credit should read Miguel Schincariol/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators take part in a protest against the government of president Dilma Rousseff in Porto Alegre, Brazil on 12 April, 2015. Tens of thousands of Brazilians turned out for demonstrations Sundays to oppose leftist president Dilma Rousseff, a target of rising discontent amid a faltering economy and a massive corruption scandal at state oil giant Petrobras. AFP PHOTO / Jefferson BERNARDES (Photo credit should read JEFFERSON BERNARDES/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators hold a sign reading 'Enough of impunity! Beware Brazil' during a protest against the government of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff along Paulista Avenue in Sao Paulo, Brazil on April 12, 2015. Tens of thousands of Brazilians took to the streets Sunday, venting anger over government corruption and economic drift just one month after widespread protests drew more than a million people. AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators make a selfie as they rally to protest against the government of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff along Paulista Avenue in Sao Paulo, Brazil on April 12, 2015. Tens of thousands of Brazilians took to the streets Sunday, venting anger over government corruption and economic drift just one month after widespread protests drew more than a million people. AFP PHOTO / NELSON ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
A street vendor sells shirts with the words "Dilma out, and take the Workers Party with you," written on it during a protest demanding the impeachment of Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Sunday, April 12, 2015. The protest movement has been organized, mostly via social media, by a motley assortment of groups. Most call for Rousseff’s impeachment, but they are joined by others with demands ranging from looser gun control laws to a military coup. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)
Demonstrators, one dressed as a prisoner and wearing a mask with the likeness of Brazil's former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, joke with fake money from a mock jail during a protest demanding the impeachment of Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Sunday, March 15, 2015. It was the second such day of protests in less than a month and comes as polls show Rousseff with historically low approval ratings amid a corruption scandal at the state-run oil company, Petrobras, as well as a spluttering economy, a rapidly depreciating currency and political infighting. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)
Thousands of demonstrators take part in anti-government protest in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Sunday, April 12, 2015. Anti-government demonstrators began streaming throughout Brazil on Sunday to demand the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff. The banner reads in Portuguese "We demand the end of corruption. Respect the Brazilian People." (AP Photo/Nelson Antoine)
A demonstrator shows a sign that reads in Portuguese "Go to Cuba!" depicting an image of Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff and Former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva during an anti-government protest in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Sunday, April 12, 2015. The protest movement has been organized, mostly via social media, by a motley assortment of groups. Most call for Rousseff’s impeachment, but they are joined by others with demands ranging from looser gun control laws to a military coup. (AP Photo/Nelson Antoine)
A demonstrator shouts anti-government slogans during a march demanding the impeachment of Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Sunday, April 12, 2015. It was the second such day of protests in less than a month and comes as polls show Rousseff with historically low approval ratings amid a corruption scandal at the state-run oil company, Petrobras, as well as a spluttering economy, a rapidly depreciating currency and political infighting. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)
A demonstrator shout slogans during an anti-government protest in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Sunday, April 12, 2015. The protest movement has been organized, mostly via social media, by a motley assortment of groups. Most call for Rousseff’s impeachment, but they are joined by others with demands ranging from looser gun control laws to a military coup. (AP Photo/Nelson Antoine)
Demonstrators shout anti-government slogans as they march holding signs that reads in Portuguese "Dilma Out" and "Corrupt Out", during a protest demanding the impeachment of Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Sunday, April 12, 2015. It was the second such day of protests in less than a month and comes as polls show Rousseff with historically low approval ratings amid a corruption scandal at the state-run oil company, Petrobras, as well as a spluttering economy, a rapidly depreciating currency and political infighting. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)
Protesters wave a giant Brazilian flag with a caricature of Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff during an anti-government protest at Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday, April 12, 2015. Anti-government demonstrators marched in cities throughout Brazil to demand the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff. In Rio de Janeiro, a protest along the golden sands of Copacabana drew several hundred people, a far cry from the several thousand-strong turnout last month. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
People march during an anti-government protest at Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Sunday, April 12, 2015. Anti-government demonstrators began streaming into the streets of cities throughout Brazil on Sunday to demand the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
A demonstrator shows Brazilian coins, that she says are worthless, during an anti-government protest at Copacabana beach, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday, April 12, 2015. Anti-government demonstrators marched in cities throughout Brazil to demand the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff. In Rio de Janeiro, a protest along the golden sands of Copacabana drew several hundred people, a far cry from the several thousand-strong turnout last month. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)
A protester with his face painted holds a flag during a protest at Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Sunday, April 12, 2015. Anti-government demonstrators began streaming into the streets of cities throughout Brazil on Sunday to demand the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

The protest movement has been organized, mostly via social media, by a motley assortment of groups. Most call for Rousseff's impeachment, but they are joined by others with demands ranging from looser gun control laws to a military coup.

Helicopter television images showed crowds of demonstrators, many of them dressed in the yellow and green colors of the Brazilian flag and brandishing placards reading "Dilma Out," congregating in the capital, Brasilia, and cities from Belem in the Amazon rainforest region to the southern city of Curitiba.

Still, the crowds seemed thinner than at the March 15 demonstrations, when more than 200,000 people turned out just in Sao Paulo, Brazil's economic capital and an opposition bastion. That rally was among the city's biggest since demonstrations in 1984 demanding the end of the military dictatorship.

Sao Paulo protester Renato Alves Pereira said he was hoped the movement would succeed in ousting Rousseff.

"She must be impeached because she and the Workers' Party are responsible for all that is wrong with Brazil - corruption, inflation and unemployment on the rise, terrible public services like health and education," said the 34-year-old marketing director.

33 PHOTOS
Brazil President Dilma Rousseff re-elected
See Gallery
Large protests across Brazil seek ouster of president
Brazil's President and Workers Party presidential candidate Dilma Rousseff, shows her electronic voting receipt that confirms she voted in the presidential runoff election as she drinks mate, an herbal tea, in Porto Alegre, Brazil, Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014. Rousseff is leading opposition contender Aecio Neves 51-to-49 percent with 95 percent of the vote counted. Still, there are too many uncounted votes for a winner to be declared. That's according to the official count Sunday night from the nation's top electoral court. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Supporters of Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff, who is running for re-election with the Workers Party, PT, celebrate the election results before a press conference in a hotel in Brasilia, Brazil, Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014. Rousseff is leading opposition contender Aecio Neves with 95 percent of the vote counted. Still, there are too many uncounted votes for a winner to be declared. That's according to the official count Sunday night from the nation's top electoral court. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
A supporter of Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff, who is running for re-election with the Workers Party, PT, celebrates the election results before a press conference in a hotel in Brasilia, Brazil, Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014. Rousseff is leading opposition contender Aecio Neves with 95 percent of the vote counted. Still, there are too many uncounted votes for a winner to be declared. That's according to the official count Sunday night from the nation's top electoral court. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
Supporters of Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff, who is running for re-election with the Workers Party, PT, celebrate the election results before a press conference in a hotel in Brasilia, Brazil, Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014. Rousseff is leading opposition contender Aecio Neves with 95 percent of the vote counted. Still, there are too many uncounted votes for a winner to be declared. That's according to the official count Sunday night from the nation's top electoral court. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)
A supporter of Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff, who is running for re-election with the Workers Party, PT, celebrates the election results in Brasilia, Brazil, Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014. Rousseff is leading opposition contender Aecio Neves with 95 percent of the vote counted. Still, there are too many uncounted votes for a winner to be declared. That's according to the official count Sunday night from the nation's top electoral court. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Supporters of re-elected President Dilma Rousseff, for the Workers' Party (PT), celebrate in Brasilia on October 26, 2014. Leftist incumbent Dilma Rousseff was re-elected president of Brazil, the country's Supreme Electoral Tribunal said, after a down-to-the-wire race against center-right challenger Aecio Neves. Rousseff, who had 51.45 percent of the vote with 98 percent of ballots counted, was declared the run-off winner. AFP PHOTO / EVARISTO SA (Photo credit should read EVARISTO SA/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of re-elected President Dilma Rousseff, for the Workers' Party (PT), celebrate in Brasilia on October 26, 2014. Leftist incumbent Dilma Rousseff was re-elected president of Brazil, the country's Supreme Electoral Tribunal said, after a down-to-the-wire race against center-right challenger Aecio Neves. Rousseff, who had 51.45 percent of the vote with 98 percent of ballots counted, was declared the run-off winner. AFP PHOTO / EVARISTO SA (Photo credit should read EVARISTO SA/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of re-elected President Dilma Rousseff, for the Workers' Party (PT), celebrate in Brasilia on October 26, 2014. Leftist incumbent Dilma Rousseff was re-elected president of Brazil, the country's Supreme Electoral Tribunal said, after a down-to-the-wire race against center-right challenger Aecio Neves. Rousseff, who had 51.45 percent of the vote with 98 percent of ballots counted, was declared the run-off winner. AFP PHOTO / EVARISTO SA (Photo credit should read EVARISTO SA/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of re-elected President Dilma Rousseff, for the Workers' Party (PT), celebrate in Brasilia on October 26, 2014. Leftist incumbent Dilma Rousseff was re-elected president of Brazil, the country's Supreme Electoral Tribunal said, after a down-to-the-wire race against center-right challenger Aecio Neves. Rousseff, who had 51.45 percent of the vote with 98 percent of ballots counted, was declared the run-off winner. AFP PHOTO / EVARISTO SA (Photo credit should read EVARISTO SA/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of re-elected President Dilma Rousseff, for the Workers' Party (PT), celebrate in Brasilia on October 26, 2014. Leftist incumbent Dilma Rousseff was re-elected president of Brazil, the country's Supreme Electoral Tribunal said, after a down-to-the-wire race against center-right challenger Aecio Neves. Rousseff, who had 51.45 percent of the vote with 98 percent of ballots counted, was declared the run-off winner. AFP PHOTO / EVARISTO SA (Photo credit should read EVARISTO SA/AFP/Getty Images)
BRASILIA, BRAZIL - OCTOBER 26: Supporters of Brazilian President and Workers' Party (PT) candidate Dilma Rousseff cheer as partial results are announced on October 26, 2014 in Brasilia, Brazil. Rousseff is facing off with Presidential candidate of the Brazilian Social Democratic Party (PSDB) Aecio Neves in a run-off election today. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
BRASILIA, BRAZIL - OCTOBER 26: Supporters of Brazilian President and Workers' Party (PT) candidate Dilma Rousseff cheer as partial results are announced on October 26, 2014 in Brasilia, Brazil. Rousseff is facing off with Presidential candidate of the Brazilian Social Democratic Party (PSDB) Aecio Neves in a run-off election today. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Supporters of Brazilian President and presidential candidate for the Workers Party (PT), Dilma Rousseff celebrate following the first partial results in the run-off election, in Brasilia on October 26, 2014. AFP PHOTO / EVARISTO SA (Photo credit should read EVARISTO SA/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of Brazilian President and presidential candidate for the Workers Party (PT), Dilma Rousseff celebrate following the first partial results in the run-off election, in Brasilia on October 26, 2014. AFP PHOTO / EVARISTO SA (Photo credit should read EVARISTO SA/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of Brazilian President and presidential candidate for the Workers Party (PT), Dilma Rousseff celebrate following the first partial results in the run-off election, in Brasilia on October 26, 2014. AFP PHOTO / EVARISTO SA (Photo credit should read EVARISTO SA/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of Brazilian President and presidential candidate for the Workers Party (PT), Dilma Rousseff celebrate following the first partial results, in Brasilia on October 26, 2014. AFP PHOTO / EVARISTO SA (Photo credit should read EVARISTO SA/AFP/Getty Images)
Supporters of Brazilian President and presidential candidate for the Workers Party (PT), Dilma Rousseff celebrate following the first partial results, in Brasilia on October 26, 2014. AFP PHOTO / EVARISTO SA (Photo credit should read EVARISTO SA/AFP/Getty Images)
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - OCTOBER 26. Supporters of the Brazilian President and the Workers' Party (PT) celebrate at party headquarters on October 26, 2014 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. President Dilma Rousseff won reelection with 51% of the valid votes. (Photos by Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)
BRASILIA, BRAZIL - OCTOBER 26: Supporters of Brazilian President and Workers' Party (PT) candidate Dilma Rousseff cheer as partial results are announced on October 26, 2014 in Brasilia, Brazil. Rousseff is facing off with Presidential candidate of the Brazilian Social Democratic Party (PSDB) Aecio Neves in a run-off election today. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - OCTOBER 26. Supporters of the Brazilian President and the Workers' Party (PT) celebrate at party headquarters on October 26, 2014 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. President Dilma Rousseff won reelection with 51% of the valid votes. (Photos by Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - OCTOBER 26. Supporters of the Brazilian President and the Workers' Party (PT) celebrate at party headquarters on October 26, 2014 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. President Dilma Rousseff won reelection with 51% of the valid votes. (Photos by Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - OCTOBER 26. Supporters of the Brazilian President and the Workers' Party (PT) celebrate at party headquarters on October 26, 2014 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. President Dilma Rousseff won reelection with 51% of the valid votes. (Photos by Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - OCTOBER 26. Supporters of the Brazilian President and the Workers' Party (PT) celebrate at party headquarters on October 26, 2014 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. President Dilma Rousseff won reelection with 51% of the valid votes. (Photos by Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - OCTOBER 26. Supporters of the Brazilian President and the Workers' Party (PT) celebrate at party headquarters on October 26, 2014 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. President Dilma Rousseff won reelection with 51% of the valid votes. (Photos by Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - OCTOBER 26. Supporters of the Brazilian President and the Workers' Party (PT) celebrate at party headquarters on October 26, 2014 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. President Dilma Rousseff won reelection with 51% of the valid votes. (Photos by Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - OCTOBER 26. Supporters of the Brazilian President and the Workers' Party (PT) celebrate at party headquarters on October 26, 2014 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. President Dilma Rousseff won reelection with 51% of the valid votes. (Photos by Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)
Hundreds of supporters celebrate the reelection of the Brazilian President and presidential candidate for the Workers' Party (PT) Dilma Rousseff in the presidential election run-off along Paulista Avenue in Sao Paulo Brazil on October 26 2014. Leftist incumbent Dilma Rousseff was re-elected president of Brazil on Sunday, the country's Supreme Electoral Tribunal said, after a down-to-the-wire race against center-right challenger Aecio Neves. AFP PHOTO / Nelson ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - OCTOBER 26. Supporters of the Brazilian President and the Workers' Party (PT) celebrate at party headquarters on October 26, 2014 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. President Dilma Rousseff won reelection with 51% of the valid votes. (Photos by Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - OCTOBER 26. Supporters of the Brazilian President and the Workers' Party (PT) celebrate at party headquarters on October 26, 2014 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. President Dilma Rousseff won reelection with 51% of the valid votes. (Photos by Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)
SAO PAULO, BRAZIL - OCTOBER 26: Partido dos Trabalhadores activist walks with a flag of President Dilma Rousseff during the second round of elections on October 26, 2014 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Incumbent President Dilma Rousseff is competing against social democrat Aecio Neves for president. (Photo by Victor Moriyama/Getty Images)
Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff, presidential candidate for re-election of the Workers Party (PT), gestures next to an electronic ballot box after voting during Brazil's presidential election runoff in Porto Alegre, Brazil, Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff, presidential candidate for re-election of the Workers Party (PT), left, is kissed by Tarso Genro, governor of Rio Grande do Sul, also running for re-election with PT, after voting during Brazil's presidential election runoff in Porto Alegre, Brazil, Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

In Rio de Janeiro, a protest along the golden sands of Copacabana drew a sparse few thousand people, a far cry from the strong turnout here last month.

Analysts say a lower turnout could harm the future of the campaign to impeach Rousseff.

"Sunday's demonstration faces a big problem, which is one of comparison," said Carlos Lopes, a political risk analyst at Brasilia office of the Insituto Analise consultancy.

"If it doesn't (match the size of the March 15 protests), people will be less inclined take part in future demonstrations and the movement toward large-scale rallies will begin to fizzle out," he said in a telephone interview.

One Brazilian president, Fernando Collor de Mello, who was accused of corruption by his own brother, has been impeached since Brazil's return to democracy in 1985, but many legal experts have said that Rousseff could only be impeached if evidence emerges directly linking her to crimes committed during her second term, which began in January.

Still, a survey released Saturday by the Folha de S.Paulo daily found that 63 percent of Brazilians surveyed supported impeachment proceedings against Rousseff, while 33 percent opposed them. The same poll, by the respected Datafolha polling agency, showed Rousseff's approval ratings holding steady, with 13 percent of respondents giving her a great or good rating while 60 percent of respondents evaluated her performance as bad or terrible. The survey of 2,834 people in 171 municipalities was conducted on Thursday and Friday. It had a margin of error of plus or minus 2 percentage points.

Much of the protesters' ire focused on the Petrobras scandal. Prosecutors say at least $800 million was paid in bribes and other funds by construction and engineering firms in exchange for inflated Petrobras contracts, though the scheme apparently began in 1997, six years before Rousseff's party won power.

Rousseff, a former chairwoman of Petrobras' board, has not been implicated and so far is not being investigated, though two of her former chiefs of staff are among the dozens of officials caught up in the inquiry.

In 2013, more than a million people took to the streets in a single day to protest against the high cost of living, poor public schools and hospitals and lavish government spending on sporting events like last year's World Cup soccer tournament and the 2016 Olympic games in Rio.

While the 2013 demonstrations were marred by widespread police violence against protesters, this year's demonstrations have been largely peaceful.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners