Obama nearly twice as popular in Cuba as in the US

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Obama's Popularity Is Growing... In Cuba

President Barack Obama's is really popular -- just not at home.

In the wake of recent efforts to repair relations between the U.S and Cuba, 80 percent of Cuban Americans questioned in a new poll conducted for Fusion said they have at least a somewhat positive view of Obama. Of those, 34 percent said they have a very positive opinion of him.

The poll also found nearly nine out of every 10 Cubans think Obama should come visit their island nation.

Meanwhile, back on American soil President Obama's approval rating is around 47 percent, according to the most recent polling. That also happens to be the same popularity rating President Raul Castro enjoys among Cubans.

Even at the height of his popularity, Obama never enjoyed such high approval ratings in the United States as he does in Cuba today. According to polling outfit Gallup, he had his highest approval ratings in January 2009, shortly after he was sworn into office, when seven out of ten Americans approved of him. He hit his lowest approval rating most recently in early September 2014, shortly after ISIS killed American journalist Steven Sotloff two weeks after killing fellow American James Foley.

His approval rating has not been above 50 percent in the United States since 2013.

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Obama nearly twice as popular in Cuba as in the US
US President Barack Obama tours the Bob Marley Museum led by tour guide Natasha Clark (3rd-L) in Kingston, Jamaica on April 8, 2015. Obama, the first sitting US president to set foot on the island since 1982, is in the country to meet with a regional block of Caribbean nations and possibly offer them an alternative to cheap Venezuelan oil amid a spat with Caracas. He heads late April 9th to Panama, where he may have a landmark meeting with Cuba's communist President Raul Castro. AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Activists from the ANSWER Coalition (Act Now to Stop War and End Racism) hold up yellow placards during a demonstration for a call to 'End the Blockade of Cuba', as students from School Without Walls High School (front)perform a die-in on Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House in Washington, DC, December 17, 2014, demonstrating against police violence and human rights. AFP PHOTO/JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Abdel Rodriguez protests at Versaille's Restaurant in Miami on Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014, after President Obama's decision to normalize relations between Cuba and the United States. (Al Diaz/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
HAVANA - SEPTEMBER 30: Cuban youth reportedly numbering in the thousands march holding the Cuban flag to demand the release of the three remaining Cuban agents imprisoned in the U.S., members of the so-called Cuban Five, on Havanas Malecon waterfront, on September 30, 2014, in Havana, Cuba. The Cuban-Five are five Cuban men convicted in the U.S. on conspiracy and espionage charges for spying on behalf of Fidel Castro's government, while Cuba claims they had been infiltrated into the Cuban-Exile community to prevent further terrorists attacks against Cuba. Rene Gonzalez and Fernando Gonzales LLort, the two released already, were leading the march. (Photo by Sven Creutzmann/Mambo photo/Getty Images)
HAVANA - SEPTEMBER 30: Cuban youth hold up dozens of photos of Cubans that Cuba claims are victims of aggressions by the U.S. against Cuba, including the 1976 bombing of Cubana Flight 455 that killed all 78 onboard, as Cuban students reportedly numbering in the thousands march to demand the release of the three remaining Cuban agents imprisoned in the U.S., members of the so-called Cuban Five, on Havanas Malecon waterfront, on September 30, 2014, in Havana, Cuba. The Cuban-Five are five Cuban men convicted in the U.S. on conspiracy and espionage charges for spying on behalf of Fidel Castro's government, while Cuba claims they had been infiltrated into the Cuban-Exile community to prevent further terrorists attacks against Cuba. The march was led by Rene Gonzalez and Fernando Gonzales LLort, the two agents who have been released already. (Photo by Sven Creutzmann/Mambo photo/Getty Images)
HAVANA - SEPTEMBER 30: Cuban students reportedly numbering in the thousands march under a statue of Cuban national hero Jose Marti toward the U.S. Interest Section to demand the release of the three remaining Cuban agents imprisoned in the U.S., members of the so-called Cuban Five, on Havanas Malecon waterfront, on September 30, 2014, in Havana, Cuba. The Cuban-Five are five Cuban men convicted in the U.S. on conspiracy and espionage charges for spying on behalf of Fidel Castro's government, while Cuba claims they had been infiltrated into the Cuban-Exile community to prevent further terrorists attacks against Cuba. The march was led by Rene Gonzalez and Fernando Gonzales LLort, the two agents who have been released already. (Photo by Sven Creutzmann/Mambo photo/Getty Images)
HAVANA - SEPTEMBER 30: Cuban youth reportedly numbering in the thousands march to demand the release of the three remaining Cuban agents imprisoned in the U.S., members of the so-called Cuban Five, on September 30, 2014, in Havana, Cuba. The Cuban-Five are five Cuban men convicted in the U.S. on conspiracy and espionage charges for spying on behalf of Fidel Castro's government, while Cuba claims they had been infiltrated into the Cuban-Exile community to prevent further terrorists attacks against Cuba. Rene Gonzalez and Fernando Gonzales LLort, the two released already, were leading the march. (Photo by Sven Creutzmann/Mambo photo/Getty Images)
HAVANA - SEPTEMBER 30: Cuban youth reportedly numbering in the thousands march holding the Cuban flag to demand the release of the three remaining Cuban agents imprisoned in the U.S., members of the so-called Cuban Five, on Havanas Malecon waterfront, on September 30, 2014, in Havana, Cuba. The Cuban-Five are five Cuban men convicted in the U.S. on conspiracy and espionage charges for spying on behalf of Fidel Castro's government, while Cuba claims they had been infiltrated into the Cuban-Exile community to prevent further terrorists attacks against Cuba. Rene Gonzalez and Fernando Gonzales LLort, the two released already, were leading the march. (Photo by Sven Creutzmann/Mambo photo/Getty Images)
HAVANA - SEPTEMBER 30: Cuban youth reportedly numbering in the thousands march holding the Cuban flag to demand the release of the three remaining Cuban agents imprisoned in the U.S., members of the so-called Cuban Five, on Havanas Malecon waterfront, on September 30, 2014, in Havana, Cuba. The Cuban-Five are five Cuban men convicted in the U.S. on conspiracy and espionage charges for spying on behalf of Fidel Castro's government, while Cuba claims they had been infiltrated into the Cuban-Exile community to prevent further terrorists attacks against Cuba. Rene Gonzalez and Fernando Gonzales LLort, the two released already, were leading the march. (Photo by Sven Creutzmann/Mambo photo/Getty Images)
HAVANA - SEPTEMBER 30: Cuban youth reportedly numbering in the thousands march to demand the release of the three remaining Cuban agents imprisoned in the U.S., members of the so-called Cuban Five, on September 30, 2014, in Havana, Cuba. The Cuban Five are five Cuban men convicted in the U.S. on conspiracy and espionage charges for spying on behalf of Fidel Castro's government, while Cuba claims they had been infiltrated into the Cuban-Exile community to prevent further terrorists attacks against Cuba. Rene Gonzalez and Fernando Gonzales LLort, the two released already, were leading the march. (Photo by Sven Creutzmann/Mambo photo/Getty Images)
HAVANA - SEPTEMBER 30: Cuban youth reportedly numbering in the thousands march to demand the release of the three remaining Cuban agents imprisoned in the U.S., members of the so-called Cuban Five, on September 30, 2014, in Havana, Cuba. The Cuban-Five are five Cuban men convicted in the U.S. on conspiracy and espionage charges for spying on behalf of Fidel Castro's government, while Cuba claims they had been infiltrated into the Cuban-Exile community to prevent further terrorists attacks against Cuba. Rene Gonzalez and Fernando Gonzales LLort, the two released already, were leading the march. (Photo by Sven Creutzmann/Mambo photo/Getty Images)
HAVANA - SEPTEMBER 30: Former Cuban agent Rene Gonzalez wears a Che Guevra T-shirt as he and his wife Olga Salanueva and Cuban students numbering reportedly in the thousands march to demand the release of the three remaining Cuban agents imprisoned in the U.S., members of the so-called Cuban Five, on Havanas Malecon waterfront, on September 30, 2014, in Havana, Cuba. The Cuban-Five are five Cuban men convicted in the U.S. on conspiracy and espionage charges for spying on behalf of Fidel Castro's government, while Cuba claims they had been infiltrated into the Cuban-Exile community to prevent further terrorists attacks against Cuba. Gonzalez and Fernando Gonzales LLort, the two agents who have been released already, led the march. (Photo by Sven Creutzmann/Mambo photo/Getty Images)
HAVANA - SEPTEMBER 30: Cuban youth hold up dozens of photos of Cubans that Cuba claims are victims of aggressions by the U.S. against Cuba, including the 1976 bombing of Cubana Flight 455 that killed all 78 onboard, as Cuban students reportedly numbering in the thousands march to demand the release of the three remaining Cuban agents imprisoned in the U.S., members of the so-called Cuban Five, on Havanas Malecon waterfront, on September 30, 2014, in Havana, Cuba. The Cuban-Five are five Cuban men convicted in the U.S. on conspiracy and espionage charges for spying on behalf of Fidel Castro's government, while Cuba claims they had been infiltrated into the Cuban-Exile community to prevent further terrorists attacks against Cuba. The march was led by Rene Gonzalez and Fernando Gonzales LLort, the two agents who have been released already. (Photo by Sven Creutzmann/Mambo photo/Getty Images)
Protestors march in front of the White House calling for the release of the Cuban 5 on September 12, 2014 in Washington, DC. In September 1998, five Cuban men were arrested in Miami by FBI agents. Gerardo Hernandez, Ramón Labañino, Fernando Gonzalez, Antonio Guerrero and René Gonzalez were accused of the crime of conspiracy to commit espionage and have been imprisoned in the US since. AFP PHOTO/Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Ana Lourdes Cuesta, left, and Liliana Cuerra, of Miami, protest in Miami, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014, the Obama administration's decision to re-establish diplomatic relationships with Cuba. Cuerra holds a sign that reads "Obama coward." (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier)
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