Giant Edward Snowden bust appears atop Brooklyn memorial, sparking investigation

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Giant Edward Snowden Bust Appears in NYC Park

FORT GREENE (WPIX) -- Police are investigating a mysterious monument to NSA file-leaker Edward Snowden that appeared in a Brooklyn park Monday morning.

Three artists created the bust of the former systems analyst and, with the help of others, "hauled the 100-pound sculpture into Fort Greene Park and up its hilly terrain just before dawn," reports Animal New York. The artists allowed Animal to document the guerrilla installation as long as their anonymity was preserved, according to the site.

The bust was affixed to the Prison Ship Martyrs Monument, created to remember the captured American soldiers who died during the Revolutionary War.

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Giant Edward Snowden bust appears atop Brooklyn memorial, sparking investigation
New York City Department of Parks and Recreation employees take down a statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
New York City Department of Parks and Recreation employees take down a statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
New York City Department of Parks and Recreation employees take down a statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
New York City Department of Parks and Recreation employees take down a statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
A statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden is seen at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
New York City Department of Parks and Recreation employees take down a statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
New York City Department of Parks and Recreation employees take down a statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
New York City Department of Parks and Recreation employees take down a statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman points to a covered up statue of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden at the Fort Greene Park in Brooklyn, New York, on April 6, 2015. A group of artists on Monday installed a bust of fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on a war memorial in a New York park, though authorities quickly removed the illicit statue. Snowden, 31, a former contractor at the US National Security Agency, has lived in exile in Russia since 2013 after revealing mass spying programs by the United States and its allies. AFP PHOTO/ JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
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Entitled "Prison Ship Martyr's Monument 2.0," the artists wrote in the description,

Fort Greene's Prison Ship Martyrs Monument is a memorial to American POWs who lost their lives during the Revolutionary War. We have updated this monument to highlight those who sacrifice their safety in the fight against modern-day tyrannies. It would be a dishonor to those memorialized here to not laud those who protect the ideals they fought for, as Edward Snowden has by bringing the NSA's 4th-Amendment-violating surveillance programs to light. All too often, figures who strive to uphold these ideals have been cast as criminals rather than in bronze.

By early Monday afternoon, New York City Parks Department workers arrived to officially veil the illicit sculpture, throwing a blue tarp over Snowden, and securing it with twine.

The parks department would not comment, but an NYPD spokesman told PIX11, "We are aware of the situation and the Intelligence Division is investigating."

No arrests have been made.

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