3D print technology provides 'robohand' to 7-year-old girl

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7-Year-Old Girl Gets 3D Printed 'Robohand'

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif. (AP) - Although she never had much interest in prosthetic limbs before, Faith Lennox couldn't wait to slip on her new robohand and road-test it.

The 7-year-old, who lost part of her left arm when she was a baby, grabbed the replacement as soon as it came off a 3-D printer Tuesday in Los Alamitos, California. She put it on and raced off on her bicycle.

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3D print technology provides 'robohand' to 7-year-old girl
Faith Lennox, 7, left, forms a heart with her newly 3D printed hand at the Build it Workspace in Los Alamitos, Calif., on Tuesday, March 31, 2015. The oldest of three children, Faith had compartment syndrome when her position during childbirth cut off the flow of blood to her left forearm, irreparably damaging tissue, muscle and bone. After nine months of trying to save the limb, doctors determined they had to amputate just below the elbow. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
Faith Lennox, 7, adjusts her helmet before riding her bicycle with her newly 3D printed hand outside Build it Workspace in Los Alamitos, Calif., Tuesday, March 31, 2015. The oldest of three children, Faith had compartment syndrome when her position during childbirth cut off the flow of blood to her left forearm, irreparably damaging tissue, muscle and bone. After nine months of trying to save the limb, doctors determined they had to amputate just below the elbow. Faith got to pick the colors, her favorite pink, blue and purple, like the ones on the tank top she was wearing. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
Faith Lennox, 7, left, shows her mother Nicole her newly 3-D printed hand at the Build it Workspace in Los Alamitos, Calif., on Tuesday, March 31, 2015. Build It Workspace is a 3-D printer studio that teaches people to use high-tech printers and provides access to them for projects. Faith's new hand is the result of an emerging technology that is revolutionizing prosthetics, said Build It's Mark Lengsfeld, especially for children like Faith, who quickly outgrow expensive prosthetic limbs and have trouble even using them because of their size and weight. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
Greg Lennox holds a "Nemo" plastic fish as his daughter Faith grabs it with her newly 3-D printed hand as her mother, Nicole and Build it Workspace president, Mark Lengsfeld, looks on at the Build it Workspace in Los Alamitos, Calif., on Tuesday, March 31, 2015. Faith's new hand is the result of an emerging technology that is revolutionizing prosthetics, said Lengsfeld, especially for children like Faith, who quickly outgrow expensive prosthetic limbs and have trouble even using them because of their size and weight. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
Faith Lennox, 7, right, smiles as she holds an extra plastic prosthetics part with her newly 3-D printed hand at the Build it Workspace in Los Alamitos, Calif., on Tuesday, March 31, 2015. At left, her aunt, Grace Stedman. Build It Workspace is a 3-D printer studio that teaches people to use high-tech printers and provides access to them for projects. Faith's new hand is the result of an emerging technology that is revolutionizing prosthetics, said Build It's Mark Lengsfeld, especially for children like Faith, who quickly outgrow expensive prosthetic limbs and have trouble even using them because of their size and weight. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
Faith Lennox, 7, adjust her newly 3-D printed hand at the Build it Workspace in Los Alamitos, Calif., on Tuesday, March 31, 2015. Build It Workspace is a 3-D printer studio that teaches people to use high-tech printers and provides access to them for projects. Faith's new hand is the result of an emerging technology that is revolutionizing prosthetics, said Build It's Mark Lengsfeld, especially for children like Faith, who quickly outgrow expensive prosthetic limbs and have trouble even using them because of their size and weight. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
Faith Lennox, 7, rides her bicycle with her newly 3D printed hand outside the Build it Workspace parking lot in Los Alamitos, Calif., on Tuesday, March 31, 2015. The oldest of three children, Faith had compartment syndrome when her position during childbirth cut off the flow of blood to her left forearm, irreparably damaging tissue, muscle and bone. After nine months of trying to save the limb, doctors determined they had to amputate just below the elbow. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
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Later, Faith happily showed off the hand to others, flexing its pink and blue fingers as she gripped her small, stuffed "Finding Nemo" fish.

The prosthetic was constructed overnight at the Build It Workspace studio. It represents a breakthrough in small, lightweight hands that are economical and easy for children to use.

Faith's father, Greg, says he sees it changing her life in the years to come.

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