G20 world leaders' personal info accidentally released

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G20 World Leaders Personal Info Accidentally Released

The personal information of President Barack Obama, Russian President Vladimir Putin, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and at least a dozen other world leaders who attended the G20 Summit was accidentally leaked by Australia.

The country's immigration department says passport numbers, visa info and other details were sent to organizers of the Asian Cup football tournament by "human error."

In an internal email obtained through Australia's freedom of information law, the department confirmed an agency employee "failed to check that the autofill function in Microsoft Outlook had entered the correct person's details into the email 'To' field. This led to the email being sent to the wrong person."

According to The Guardian, the email has been wiped completely and the Asian Cup committee does not believe it is accessible in any public domain or recoverable since being deleted.

In the emails, an immigration agency official recommended they keep the leak from the world leaders, "given that the risks of the breach are considered very low and the actions that have been taken to limit the further distribution of the email." It's still not clear whether the 31 world leaders were informed of the breach... but we're pretty sure they're aware of it now.

This isn't the immigration department's first flub. Last year, the agency inadvertently disclosed personal details of nearly 10,000 people being held in the country who were seeking asylum.

The U.S. has had its share of online accidents involving vital information.

In May, the White House exposed the CIA's top spy in Kabul by mistakenly including his name on a list provided to the media about President Obama's agenda during a surprise visit to troops in Afghanistan.

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