Illinois Rep. Aaron Schock announces resignation

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Illinois Rep. Aaron Schock announces resignation
Illinois Congressman Aaron Schock announced he's resigning amid controversy over his spending of taxpayer and campaign dollars.
UNITED STATES - DECEMBER 04: Reps. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., and Aaron Schock, R-Ill., say goodbye after at the bottom of the House Steps after the last vote of the week in the Capitol, December 4, 2014. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
During a House Ways and Means Committee hearing on President Barack Obama's budget, Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., peruses a magazine as Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius testifies on Medicare spending and related issues, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, April 12, 2013. The publication Schock is reading is Washington Life magazine, a society magazine described as "Washington DC's premier guide to luxury, power, philanthropy & style." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., appeared on the cover of Men's Health Magazine in June 2011
Illinois Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Peoria, who is running for the 18th congressional district is hugged by supporters while watching primary election returns in Peoria, Ill., Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2008. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 30: Photos of Rep. Aaron Schock's (R-IL) new office in the Rayburn Office Building, which was designed to resemble the dining room of the PBS show 'Downton Abbey,' on January 30, 2015 in Washington, DC. The interior decorator owns a company called Euro Trash LLC. (Photo by Ben Terris/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 30: Photos of Rep. Aaron Schock's (R-IL) new office in the Rayburn Office Building, which was designed to resemble the dining room of the PBS show 'Downton Abbey,' on January 30, 2015 in Washington, DC. The interior decorator owns a company called Euro Trash LLC. (Photo by Ben Terris/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 30: Photos of Rep. Aaron Schock's (R-IL) new office in the Rayburn Office Building, which was designed to resemble the dining room of the PBS show 'Downton Abbey,' on January 30, 2015 in Washington, DC. The interior decorator owns a company called Euro Trash LLC. (Photo by Ben Terris/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 30: Photos of Rep. Aaron Schock's (R-IL) new office in the Rayburn Office Building, which was designed to resemble the dining room of the PBS show 'Downton Abbey,' on January 30, 2015 in Washington, DC. The interior decorator owns a company called Euro Trash LLC. (Photo by Ben Terris/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 30: Photos of Rep. Aaron Schock's (R-IL) new office in the Rayburn Office Building, which was designed to resemble the dining room of the PBS show 'Downton Abbey,' on January 30, 2015 in Washington, DC. The interior decorator owns a company called Euro Trash LLC. (Photo by Ben Terris/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 27: Congressman Aaron Schock attends the 2014 Global Citizen Festival to end extreme poverty by 2030 at Central Park on September 27, 2014 in New York City. (Photo by Ben Gabbe/Getty Images for Global Citizen Festival)
UNITED STATES - AUGUST 14: Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., left, talks with Jim Oberweis, Republican senate candidate for Illinois, during Republican Day at the Illinois State Fair in Springfield, Ill., August 14, 2014. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - AUGUST 14: Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., talks with Carol Hornickle during Republican Day at the Illinois State Fair in Springfield, Ill., August 14, 2014. Rep. Rodney Davis, R-Ill., appears second from right. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
FILE - In this Feb. 6, 2015 file photo, Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., speaks to reporters in Peoria, Ill. Schock spent taxpayer and campaign funds on private airplanes to fly him around the country on aircraft owned by some of his key donors, The Associated Press has found. The expenses coincide with his other high-figure entertainment and travel charges. Beyond air travel, Schock spent tens of thousands more on tickets for concerts and billed car mileage reimbursements among the highest in Congress. One venue included a sold-out Katy Perry concert in Washington last June with Schock and his interns. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman, File)
U.S. Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., speaks in support of Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner during a campaign rally outside the State Capitol in Springfield, Ill., Monday, Nov. 3, 2014. Rauner faces incumbent Democratic Gov, Pat Quinn in Tuesday's election. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)
During a House Ways and Means Committee hearing on President Barack Obama's budget, Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., peruses a magazine as Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius testifies on Medicare spending and other health issues, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, April 12, 2013. The publication Schock is reading is Washington Life magazine, described as "Washington DC's premier guide to luxury, power, philanthropy & style." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
U.S. Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., participates in a rally during Republican Day Thursday Aug 18, 2011 at the Illinois State Fairgrounds in Springfield, Ill. Republican leaders accused Democrats of mismanaging the Illinois budget. They criticized the recent income tax increase and Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn's proposal to borrow money to pay overdue bills that are piling up. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)
President Barack Obama is accompanied by Caterpillar Chief Executive Officer Jim Owens, second left, Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., second right, and Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, as they arrive in Peoria, Ill., before he visits the Caterpillar plant in East Peoria, Ill., Thursday, Feb. 12, 2009. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill. gestures while discussing the situation in Honduras, Thursday, Sept. 24,2009, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Harry Hamburg)
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 27: Congressman Aaron Schock attends the 2014 Global Citizen Festival to end extreme poverty by 2030 at Central Park on September 27, 2014 in New York City. (Photo by Ben Gabbe/Getty Images for Global Citizen Festival)
PEORIA, IL - MARCH 19: Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney (R) and Rep. Aaron Schock (R-IL) arrive for a town-hall campaign meeting on the campus of Bradley University March 19, 2012 in Peoria, Illinois. Romney is campaigning in Illinois the day before that state’s primary elections, when 54 GOP delegates are up for grabs. With Romney in the lead on delegates, fellow candidate, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum continues to compete for the 1,444 necessary to secure the nomination before the last primary, in Utah on June 26. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 02: Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., is interviewed by Roll Call in his Longworth office. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
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WASHINGTON (AP) - Republican Rep. Aaron Schock of Illinois, dogged about irregularities in his campaign finance and congressional spending accounts, suddenly announced on Tuesday that he would resign his House seat at the end of the month.

"I do this with a heavy heart," Schock said in a statement in which he said he had given the people of his Peoria-area district his all since his election in 2008.

"But the constant questions over the last six weeks have proven a great distraction that has made it too difficult for me to serve the people of the 18th District with the high standards that they deserve and which I have set for myself," he said.

Schock has come under heavy scrutiny following revelations of lavish spending, payments to donors for flights on private jets and improperly categorized expenses. On Monday, the AP confirmed that the Office of Congressional Ethics had reached out to Schock's associates as it apparently began an investigation.

The office is an outside panel that reviews ethics complaints against House members and makes recommendations to the House Ethics Committee.

A person who received a letter from the panel said the OCE was interested in conducting an interview and reviewing any relevant documents. At least two other Schock associates received similar letters, the person said. The Schock associate asked not to be identified because the ethics panel's actions are confidential.

Schock's political fall was swift. Just weeks ago, a report about his "Downton Abbey"-style office decor attracted attention about his spending.

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