Woman now in wheelchair testifies at Boston Bombing trial

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Jessica Kensky Boston Marathon w/related video in slide 2
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Woman now in wheelchair testifies at Boston Bombing trial
CAMBRIDGE, MA - DECEMBER 26: Patrick Downes and Jessica Kensky react to the log Jessica is keeping to document her activity and pain. They were newly married when they both lost legs during the Boston Marathon bombings. Jessica is struggling with her other injured leg, and is considering having it amputated. (Photo by Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
It didn't take long for prosecutors in the Boston Marathon bombing trial to convey the sense of fear, pain and grief caused by the 2013 attack. They let victims do it for them.
CAMBRIDGE, MA - DECEMBER 26: Jessica Kensky was attempting to walk to the supermarket, something she hadn't done since before the bombing, as part of evaluating whether to keep her right leg or amputate. (She is already a below-the-knee amputee on the left side from the bombing.) She and her husband Patrick Downes got about 800 feet before her leg hurt so much that she had to sit down on the park bench shown. (Photo by Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
CAMBRIDGE, MA - DECEMBER 26: Jessica Kensky takes Tylenol for the pain in her existing leg. She does not like taking narcotics for the pain. She and her husband Patrick Downes were newly married when they both lost legs during the Boston Marathon bombings. Jessica is struggling with her other injured leg, and is considering having it amputated. (Photo by Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
CAMBRIDGE, MA - DECEMBER 26: Jessica Kensky in the bathroom of her condo. She worries about losing her existing leg and how she will maneuver in her shower without her leg to balance on. She and her husband Patrick Downes were newly married when they both lost legs during the Boston Marathon bombings. Jessica is struggling with her other injured leg, and is considering having it amputated. (Photo by Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON - APRIL 21: Newlyweds Patrick Downes, left, and Jessica Kensky, who each lost a left leg in the Boston Marathon bombings last year, hold hands as they cross the finish line of the 118th Boston Marathon in wheelchairs on Monday, April 21, 2014. (Photo by David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
MEDFORD, MA - APRIL 1: Newlyweds Patrick Downes and Jessica Kensky Downes, who each lost a leg in the Boston Marathon bombing, talk about their lives before and after the attack on Tuesday, April 1, 2014. They sit with their service dog 'Rescue.' (Photo by Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
MEDFORD, MA - APRIL 1: Newlyweds Patrick Downes and Jessica Kensky Downes, who each lost a leg in the Boston Marathon bombing, talk about their lives before and after the attack during an interview on April 1, 2014. (Photo by Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON - FEBRUARY 13: Flash mob at the Copley Place mall to offer a Valentine to Boston and to Jessica Kensky, left, and her husband Patrick Downes, right, survivors of the Marathon bombing. The event was organized by NEADS, a service dog organization. (Photo by Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
MEDFORD, MA - OCTOBER 11: Jessica Kensky and her husband, Patrick Downes each lost a leg at the Boston Marathon bombing. Her new service dog is named Rescue. NEADS: Dogs for Deaf and Disabled Americans that trains these dogs, a Central Mass. nonprofit, promised to provide one dog free of charge to any of the bombing victims. Jessica is the first bombing victim to receive one. (Photo by Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
MEDFORD, MA - OCTOBER 11: Jessica Kensky and her husband, Patrick Downes each lost a leg at the Boston Marathon bombing. Her new service dog is named Rescue. NEADS: Dogs for Deaf and Disabled Americans that trains these dogs, a Central Mass. nonprofit, promised to provide one dog free of charge to any of the bombing victims. Jessica is the first bombing victim to receive one. (Photo by Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Boston Marathon husband and wife bombing survivors Patrick Downes and Jessica Kensky, who each lost a leg in last year's bombings, roll across the finish line in the 118th Boston Marathon Monday, April 21, 2014 in Boston. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
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BOSTON (AP) -- A woman testifying from her wheelchair Monday in the Boston Marathon bombing trial recalled shielding her husband from the sight of his mangled leg, being pushed to the ground as a bystander frantically tried to extinguish the flames on her body and coming to grips with becoming a double amputee.

Jessica Kensky said that she and her husband each lost a left leg in the attack and that she eventually had to have her other leg amputated as well.

"I did not want to become a bilateral amputee," Kensky said. "I wanted to paint my toenails. I wanted to put my feet in the sand, and I wanted to do all these things. To lose the second leg was a gut-wrenching, devastating decision."

Kensky testified at the federal death penalty trial of bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, whose own lawyers have acknowledged his involvement but said he we influenced by his other brother, Tamerlan, who was killed in a getaway attempt days after the bombings.

In the first two days of testimony, prosecutors called more than a dozen witnesses, including several marathon spectators who described losing limbs. About two dozen survivors, friends and family members were in the courtroom Monday.

Three people died and more than 260 others were injured when twin bombs exploded at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon.

Kensky told jurors that chaos erupted after the blasts and that she remembers trying to prevent her husband from seeing his leg. She said she didn't know she was on fire until a man shoved her down and began trying to put out the flames.

When she arrived at the hospital, she heard the voices of other bombing survivors.

"You could hear people just screaming," she said. "Very animalistic screams."

She didn't realize the extent of her injuries immediately because the front of her legs looked intact.

"At one point, they rolled me over and that's when I could tell that things were really bad, just by the looks on their faces," she said.

Her left leg was removed below the knee during surgery, and doctors attempted to reconstruct her right leg.

But after seeing specialists around the country and having multiple surgeries over more than 18 months, Kensky had surgery to amputate her right leg this January.

Also testifying Monday was a woman whose close friend died in the attacks.

Danling Zhou said her friend Lingzi Lu grabbed her arm after the first bombing.

"What happened?" Zhou recalled Lu asking. "What should we do?"

Zhou thought it was a sewer explosion. But seconds later, the second bomb exploded.

Zhou said she looked in front of her and saw a man whose legs had been blown off. She said when she looked at Lu, she thought she would be OK because she seemed to still have her arms and legs.

She found out later in the hospital that Lu had died.

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