Total solar eclipse on March 20th, 2015 in Norway

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Total Solar Eclipse on March 20, 2015

On March 20th, 2015 there will be a total eclipse of the sun. The moon will pass directly in front of our sun, blocking out its light entirely.

March 20th is also the day of the vernal equinox. As EarthSky notes, "After this 2015 equinox eclipse, the next solar eclipse at the March equinox will happen on March 20, 2034. Then there will be two more in this century: 2053 and 2072."

Unfortunately for those of us in the U.S., the total eclipse will only be visible in parts of Norway and the Faroe Islands. A partial eclipse will be seen in western Africa, Europe and northeast Asia.

You have to be extremely careful when watching this -- it's best to use a pinhole projector, which can be just a tiny hole in a piece of cardboard. Then just aim the sunlight onto another piece of paper.

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Total solar eclipse on March 20th, 2015 in Norway
Diamond ring as sun returns during total solar eclipse 1 August 2008 (Photo credit: Getty)
On 22 July 2009 the longest total solar eclipse of the 21st century was photographed from the Pacific Ocean for over 6.5 minutes. (Photo credit: Getty)
People watching solar eclipse from atop the canopy crane at the Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Cape Tribulation, Australia
On 22 July 2009 the longest total solar eclipse of the 21st century was photographed from the Pacific Ocean, observed for over 6.5 minutes. The image shows diamond ring effect seconds before the totality, with the first rays of the sun appear after totality. (Photo credit: Getty) 
NAIROBI, KENYA NOVEMBER 3:(SOUTH AFRICA OUT) A pupil from Nairobi Consolata primary school, Wangui Mwirigi looks at the total solar eclipse at Sibiloi National Park on November 3, 2 013 in Nairobi, Kenya. (Photo by Joseph Kanyi/Nation Media/Gallo Images/Getty Imagesi)
Total solar eclipse (Photo credit: Getty)
Eclipse (Photo credit: Getty)
Annular solar eclipse, composite image. Solar eclipses occur when the Moon passes across the Sun as seen from Earth. This only occurs at New Moon, and is most commonly a partial eclipse. When the Moon is at a distant point in its orbit, an annular solar eclipse occurs and the corona (revealed in a total eclipse) remains hidden due to the brightness of the solar ring. The arrangement of this digital composite (images from 2005 and 2006) displays the annular eclipse as seen on 20 May 2012 from the south-western USA. (Photo credit: Getty)
Nov. 14, 2012 - Palm Cove, Queensland, Australia - Viewing the Total Solar Eclipse on the beach at Palm Cove in far north Queensland, Australia on the morning of 14 November 2012 (Credit Image: © Andrew Gyopar/ZUMAPRESS.com)
This photo provided by Tourism Queensland shows a total solar eclipse observed on Green Island, Queensland state, Australia, Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012. Starting just after dawn, the eclipse cast its 150-kilometer (95-mile) shadow in Australia's Northern Territory, crossed the northeast tip of the country and was swooping east across the South Pacific, where no islands are in its direct path. (AP Photo/Tourism Queensland)
The sun is blocked by the moon during the total solar eclipse near Mussina in Limpopo province, South Africa, Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2002. Thousands of spectators in Australia and Africa erupted into cheers Wednesday as the moon fully obscured the late afternoon sun in a dazzling solar eclipse.(AP Photo/Gavin Stapleton )
In this photo provided by Tourism Queensland, the moment of a total solar eclipse is observed at Cape Tribulation in Queensland state, Australia, Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012. Starting just after dawn, the eclipse cast its 150-kilometer (95-mile) shadow in Australia's Northern Territory, crossed the northeast tip of the country and was swooping east across the South Pacific, where no islands are in its direct path. (AP Photo/Tourism Queensland) EDITORIAL USE ONLY
Partial phase of total eclipse of the sun on 13 November 2012 from Palm Cove, Cairns, North Queensland, Australia, Pacific
Diamond ring effect during total eclipse of the sun on 13 November 2012 from Palm Cove, Cairns, North Queensland, Australia
Taken during the total solar eclipse in Cairns, Australia in 2012. Black clouds lit up by strange colours caused by the eclipse
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, Australasia (Photo credit: Getty)
Nov. 14, 2012 - Palm Cove, Queensland, Australia - Total Solar Eclipse observed from Palm Cove in far north Queensland, Australia on the morning of 14 November 2012 (Credit Image: © Andrew Gyopar/ZUMAPRESS.com)
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