US envoy to S. Korea in stable condition after knife attack

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: South Korea Ambassador Mark Lippert attacked
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US envoy to S. Korea in stable condition after knife attack
Injured U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert, center, gets into a car to leave for a hospital in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, March 5, 2015. Lippert was attacked by a man wielding a razor and screaming that the rival Koreas should be unified, South Korean police and media said Thursday. His injuries weren't immediately clear and he was taken to a hospital for treatment. (AP Photo/Yonhap, Kim Ju-Sung)
South Korean men watch a TV news program reporting U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert injured in a knife attack at Seoul railway station in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, March 5, 2015. Lippert was slashed on the face and wrist by a man wielding a weapon with a 10-inch blade and screaming that the rival Koreas should be unified, South Korean police said. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - MARCH 05: (SOUTH KOREA OUT) In this handout image provided by Munhwa Ilbo newspaper, U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert is seen right after getting attacked on March 5, 2015 in Seoul, South Korea. Ambassador Lippert was attacked with a razor blade by a man at a venue where he was going to give a lecture. The attacker who reportedly identified himself as a representative for a watchdog organization of the disputed island Dokdo/Takeshima, was arrested immediately on site. (Photo by Chung Ha-Jong/Munhwa Ilbo via Getty Images)
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - MARCH 05: (SOUTH KOREA OUT) In this handout image provided by The Asia Economy Daily newspaper, U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert is seen after getting attacked on March 5, 2015 in Seoul, South Korea. Ambassador Lippert was attacked with a razor blade by a man at a venue where he was going to give a lecture. The attacker who reportedly identified himself as a representative for a watchdog organization of the disputed island Dokdo/Takeshima, was arrested immediately on site. (Photo by Handout/The Asia Economy Daily via Getty Images)
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - MARCH 05: (SOUTH KOREA OUT) In this handout image provided by The Asia Economy Daily newspaper, U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert is seen after getting attacked on March 5, 2015 in Seoul, South Korea. Ambassador Lippert was attacked with a razor blade by a man at a venue where he was going to give a lecture. The attacker who reportedly identified himself as a representative for a watchdog organization of the disputed island Dokdo/Takeshima, was arrested immediately on site. (Photo by Handout/The Asia Economy Daily via Getty Images)
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - MARCH 05: (SOUTH KOREA OUT) In this handout image provided by The Asia Economy Daily newspaper, U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert is seen after getting attacked on March 5, 2015 in Seoul, South Korea. Ambassador Lippert was attacked with a razor blade by a man at a venue where he was going to give a lecture. The attacker who reportedly identified himself as a representative for a watchdog organization of the disputed island Dokdo/Takeshima, was arrested immediately on site. (Photo by Handout/The Asia Economy Daily via Getty Images)
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - MARCH 05: (SOUTH KOREA OUT) In this handout image provided by The Asia Economy Daily newspaper, the man identified as Kim Ki-jong is being arrested at the site where U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert was attacked on March 5, 2015 in Seoul, South Korea. Ambassador Lippert was attacked with a razor blade by a man at a venue where he was going to give a lecture. The attacker reportedly identified himself as a representative for a watchdog organization of the disputed island Dokdo/Takeshima. (Photo by Handout/The Asia Economy Daily via Getty Images)
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - MARCH 05: (SOUTH KOREA OUT) In this handout image provided by The Asia Economy Daily newspaper, U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert is seen after getting attacked on March 5, 2015 in Seoul, South Korea. Ambassador Lippert was attacked with a razor blade by a man at a venue where he was going to give a lecture. The attacker who reportedly identified himself as a representative for a watchdog organization of the disputed island Dokdo/Takeshima, was arrested immediately on site. (Photo by Handout/The Asia Economy Daily via Getty Images)
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - MARCH 05: (SOUTH KOREA OUT) In this handout image provided by The Asia Economy Daily newspaper, the man identified as Kim Ki-jong is being arrested at the site where U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert was attacked on March 5, 2015 in Seoul, South Korea. Ambassador Lippert was attacked with a razor blade by a man at a venue where he was going to give a lecture. The attacker reportedly identified himself as a representative for a watchdog organization of the disputed island Dokdo/Takeshima. (Photo by Handout/The Asia Economy Daily via Getty Images)
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - MARCH 05: (CHINA OUT, SOUTH KOREA OUT) U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert (C) is seen injured on March 5, 2015 in Seoul, South Korea. Ambassador Lippert was attacked with a razor blade by a man at a venue where he was going to give a lecture. The attacker who reportedly identified himself as a representative for a watchdog organization of the disputed island Dokdo/Takeshima, was arrested immediately on site. (Photo by The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images)
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - MARCH 05: (CHINA OUT, SOUTH KOREA OUT) U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert (C) is seen injured on March 5, 2015 in Seoul, South Korea. Ambassador Lippert was attacked with a razor blade by a man at a venue where he was going to give a lecture. The attacker who reportedly identified himself as a representative for a watchdog organization of the disputed island Dokdo/Takeshima, was arrested immediately on site. (Photo by The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images)
U.S. Ambassador Mark Lippert was reportedly attacked by a man shouting anti-war slogans while he visited South Korea's capital city.
South Korean Vietnam War veterans shout slogans during a rally denouncing the attack on U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert near the U.S. embassy in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, March 6, 2015. A knife attack on Thursday that injured Lippert is the latest act of political violence in a deeply divided country where some protesters portray their causes as matters of life and death. Thursday's attack, which prompted rival North Korea to gloat about "knife slashes of justice," left deep gashes and damaged tendons and nerves. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
A passenger reads the newspaper reporting a Thursday's knife attack on U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert, on a subway train in Seoul, South Korea Friday, March 6, 2015. Lippert struggled with pain as he recovered Friday from the attack, while police searched the offices of the anti-U.S. activist who they say slashed the envoy while screaming demands for Korean reunification. The headline reads "U.S. ambassador was attacked by a radical." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
South Korean conservative activists with a portrait of U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert, left, and Kim Ki-jong, the suspect of slashing Lippert, stage a rally demanding quick recovery of Lippert near the U.S. embassy in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, March 6, 2015. A knife attack on Thursday that injured Lippert is the latest act of political violence in a deeply divided country where some protesters portray their causes as matters of life and death. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
A South Korean conservative activist burns a mock North Korean flag, portraits of North Korean leader Kim Jon Un and Kim Ki-jong, the suspect of slashing U.S. Ambassador Mark Lippert, during a rally demanding quick recovery of Lippert near the U.S. embassy in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, March 6, 2015. Thursday's attack, which prompted rival North Korea to gloat about "knife slashes of justice," left deep gashes and damaged tendons and nerves. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
South Korean police officers spray extinguishers after protesters set fire to a mock North Korean flag, portraits of North Korean leader Kim Jon Un and Kim Ki-jong, the suspect of slashing U.S. Ambassador Mark Lippert, during a rally demanding quick recovery of Lippert near the U.S. embassy in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, March 6, 2015. A knife attack Thursday that injured Lippert is the latest act of political violence in a deeply divided country where some protesters portray their causes as matters of life and death. The attack, which prompted rival North Korea to gloat about "knife slashes of justice," left deep gashes and damaged tendons and nerves. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
Anti-North Korea activists burn placards featuring North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un, in support of US Ambassador to Seoul Mark Lippert, during a rally in Seoul on March 6, 2015. South Korea has reacted with shock and a little shame to a violent knife attack on Lippert that jarred harshly with the image of a largely safe, well-ordered society. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
A monk prays before anti-North Korea activists holding placards in support of US Ambassador to Seoul Mark Lippert, during a rally in Seoul on March 6, 2015. South Korea has reacted with shock and a little shame to a violent knife attack on Lippert that jarred harshly with the image of a largely safe, well-ordered society. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
South Korean maverick political activist Kim Ki-Jong (C), who faces possible attempted murder charges after slashing US Ambassador Mark Lippert, as he leaves a police station for a court in Seoul on March 6, 2015. South Korean police said they were investigating possible links the man behind the shocking knife attack on the US ambassador may have had with North Korea, as Seoul voiced disgust at Pyongyang's reaction to the incident. AFP PHOTO / JUNG YEON-JE (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
A South Korean woman holds a US flag as she participates in a pro-US rally outside the US embassy in Seoul on March 6, 2015. South Korea has reacted with shock and a little shame to a violent knife attack on US ambassador Mark Lippert that jarred harshly with the image of a largely safe, well-ordered society. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
US Ambassador Mark Lippert gunmen attacked in the face
http://t.co/EuzC9YKuho
Picture released of injured U.S. ambassador Lippert on YTN http://t.co/ztxS3QzwmH
New U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert, left, shakes hands with South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se during a meeting at the Foreign Ministry in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, Oct. 31, 2014. Lippert was appointed to the post in May and was confirmed by the Senate last month. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
New U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert, right, is greeted by South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se during a meeting at the Foreign Ministry in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, Oct. 31, 2014. Lippert was appointed to the post in May and was confirmed by the Senate last month. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (4th L) and US ambassador to Japan John Roos (3rd L) exchange smiles with Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihiko Suga (3rd R), Japan's Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida (2nd R), Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera (R), US Assistant Secretary of Defense for Asia and Pacific Secretary Affairs Mark Lippert (2nd R) and Major General Andrew O'Donnell, the US Forces Japan deputy commander, at their joint announcement on a US-Japan agreement on the return of some of the US bases in Okinawa, at Abe's official residence in Tokyo April 5, 2013. Japan and the United States agreed on a plan that will see some land occupied by the US military returned to the islands in a bid to break the deadlock in a long-stalled deal. AFP PHOTO / POOL / Issei KATO (Photo credit should read ISSEI KATO/AFP/Getty Images)
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SEOUL, South Korea (AP) - U.S. Ambassador Mark Lippert was in stable condition after a man screaming demands for a unified North and South Korea slashed him on the face and wrist with a knife, South Korean police and U.S. officials said Thursday.

Media images showed a stunned-looking Lippert examining his blood-covered left hand and holding his right hand over a cut on the right side of his face, his pink tie splattered with blood.

The U.S. State Department condemned the attack, which happened at a performing arts center in downtown Seoul as the ambassador was preparing for a lecture about prospects for peace on the divided Korean Peninsula.

The U.S. Embassy later said Lippert was in stable condition after surgery at a Seoul hospital.

In a televised briefing, Chung Nam-sik of the Severance Hospital said 80 stiches were needed to close the facial wound, which was 11 centimeters (just more than 4 inches) long and 3 centimeters (just more than 1 inch) deep. He added the cut did not affect his nerves or salivary gland.

Chung said the knife penetrated through Lippert's left arm and damaged the nerves connected to his pinkie and tendons connected to his thumb. Lippert will need to be treated at the hospital for the next three or four days and may experience sensory problems in his left hand for several months, Chung said.

The attack will shock many outsiders because the United States is South Korea's closest ally, its military protector and a big trading partner and cultural influence.

But the reported comments of the suspect, 55-year-old Kim Ki-jong, during the attack - "South and North Korea should be reunified" - touch on a deep political divide in South Korea over the still-fresh legacy of the 1950-53 Korean War, which is still technically ongoing because it ended in an armistice, not a peace treaty. Some South Koreans blame the presence of 28,500 U.S. troops stationed in the South as a deterrent to the North for the continuing split of the Korean Peninsula along the world's most heavily armed border - a view North Korea's propaganda machine regularly pushes in state media.

The attack came suddenly, witnesses said. A knife-wielding man ran screaming up to Lippert as soup was being served for the breakfast meeting and began slashing, said Kim Young-man, spokesman for the group hosting the breakfast, the Korean Council for Reconciliation and Cooperation. A separate, unidentified witness told local media that as Lippert stood up for a handshake, the suspect wrestled the ambassador to the ground and slashed him with a knife.

Yonhap TV showed men in suits and ties piled on top of the attacker, who was dressed in a modern version of the traditional Korean hanbok, and Lippert later being rushed to a police car with a blood-soaked handkerchief pressed to his cheek. The suspect also shouted anti-war slogans after he was detained, police said. They said the knife was about 25 centimeters long (10 inches).

A direct attack on a senior U.S. official is unusual, but it represents a thread in South Korean society of sometimes extreme protests on both sides of the political divide. Regular small to medium-sized demonstrations, often by activists seen as professional protesters, occur across Seoul, often either by anti-U.S. liberals who support closer reconciliation with the North, or pro-government conservative groups who support the U.S. and loathe Pyongyang.

Violence sometimes breaks out at the protests. Scuffles with police and the burning of effigies of North Korean and Japanese leaders are common. Demonstrators sometimes severe their own fingers, throw bodily fluids at embassies and try to self-immolate. In 2008, hundreds of thousands took to the streets to protest U.S. beef imports after a mad cow scare in America. Both sides of the divide also protest regularly against archrival Japan, which colonized Korea in the early 20th century, over territorial and history disputes.

True to form, conservative civic groups planned to hold rallies later Thursday to condemn the attack on the ambassador.

The suspect in the attack appeared to be well-known in Seoul for his willingness to use violence to highlight his grievances.

A police official, speaking on condition of anonymity because the investigation was still happening, said the suspect in 2010 threw a piece of concrete at the Japanese ambassador in Seoul. South Korean media reported that Kim Ki-jong was later sentenced to a three-year suspended prison term over the attack. Kim, who was protesting Japan's claim to small disputed islands that are occupied by South Korea, missed the ambassador with the concrete and hit his secretary instead, the reports said.

Kim also reportedly tried to set himself on fire with gasoline while protesting in front of the presidential Blue House in October 2007. He was demanding a government investigation into an alleged 1988 rape in Kim's office, according to news reports.

South Korea's Foreign Ministry released a statement condemning the attack and vowing a thorough investigation and strengthened protection of embassies. South Korean President Park Geun-hye, who is on a Middle East tour, said in a statement that what happened was "not only a physical attack on the U.S. ambassador in South Korea but also an attack on the Korea-U.S. alliance and we will not tolerate it."

The suspect on Thursday also reportedly made mention of something that anti-U.S. protesters in Seoul have recently demonstrated against: annual U.S.-South Korean military exercises that North Korea says are preparation for an invasion. Seoul and Washington say the drills, which will run until the end of April, are defensive and routine.

North Korea each year reacts with fury to the drills, which the impoverished country is forced to respond to with drills and weapons tests of its own. In 2013 it threatened nuclear strikes on Washington and Seoul, and on the first day of this year's drills, Monday, it test-fired short range missiles in a demonstration of anger.

Lippert, 42, became ambassador in October of last year and has been a regular presence on social media and in speeches and presentations during his time in Seoul. His wife gave birth here and the couple gave their son a Korean middle name. Lippert was formerly the U.S. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Asian Affairs and a foreign policy aide to President Barack Obama when Obama was a U.S. senator.

Obama called Lippert after the attack to express his prayers for a speedy recovery, the White House said.

"We strongly condemn this act of violence," State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said. She had no other details.

___

AP writers Hyung-jin Kim in Seoul and Josh Lederman in Washington contributed to this report.

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