Jurors in Jodi Arias case: We were 11-1 for death penalty

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Jodi Arias - updated 3/5
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Jurors in Jodi Arias case: We were 11-1 for death penalty
Sandra Arias, mother of convicted murderer Jodi Arias, shrugs her shoulders as she speaks to reporters outside of Maricopa County Courthouse after a judge sentenced her daughter to life in prison without the possibility of release for killing her boyfriend, ending a nearly seven-year-old case that attracted worldwide attention, Monday, April 13, 2015, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
Jodi Arias, right, listens during her sentencing retrial, Thursday, March 5, 2015, in Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix. Arias was spared the death penalty on Thursday after a jury for a second time could not decide on her punishment. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle, Pool)
Jodi Arias, right, reacts as the jury leaves the courtroom after announcing the verdict in the sentencing phase of her retrial, Thursday, March 5, 2015, in Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix. Arias was spared the death penalty on Thursday after a jury for a second time could not decide on her punishment. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle, Pool)
Jodi Arias stands for the jury during her sentencing retrial at Maricopa County Superior Court, Thursday, Feb 12, 2015, in Phoenix. Arias was convicted of first-degree murder in May 2013 in the 2008 killing of former boyfriend Travis Alexander. However, jurors deadlocked on her punishment. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Cheryl Evans, Pool)
Jodi Arias listens as Dr. Miccio Fonseca, a clinical psychologist, a witness for the defense testifies during the sentencing phase of the Jodi Arias trial at Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix on Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. Arias was found guilty of murder last year in the 2008 killing of ex-boyfriend Travis Alexander at his suburban Phoenix home, but jurors deadlocked on whether she should be sentenced to death or life in prison. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, David Wallace, Pool)
Jodi Arias looks at her attorney as she listens to Dr. Miccio Fonseca, a clinical psychologist, a witness for the defense, testify during the sentencing phase of the Jodi Arias trial at Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix on Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. Arias was found guilty of murder last year in the 2008 killing of ex-boyfriend Travis Alexander at his suburban Phoenix home, but jurors deadlocked on whether she should be sentenced to death or life in prison. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, David Wallace, Pool)
The cell of convicted killer Jodi Arias at the Maricopa County Sheriffs Office Estrella Jail, on Thursday, May 16, 2013, in Phoenix. Arias was convicted of first-degree murder in the gruesome killing of her one-time boyfriend, Travis Alexander, in their suburban Phoenix home. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
A Maricopa County Sheriffs Deputy stands watch next the cell of convicted killer Jodi Arias at the Maricopa County Sheriffs Office Estrella Jail, on Thursday, May 16, 2013, in Phoenix. Arias was convicted of first-degree murder in the gruesome killing of her one-time boyfriend, Travis Alexander, in their suburban Phoenix home. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
Maricopa County Sheriffs Deputies stand guard in front of the cell of convicted killer Jodi Arias at the Maricopa County Sheriffs Office Estrella Jail, on Thursday, May 16, 2013, in Phoenix. Arias was convicted of first-degree murder in the gruesome killing of her one-time boyfriend, Travis Alexander, in their suburban Phoenix home. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
Prosecutor Juan Martinez presents his final arguments during the sentencing phase of the Jodi Arias retrial at Maricopa County Superior Court, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015 in Phoenix. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Mark Henle, Pool)
Travis Alexander's sister, Tanisha Sorenson, reads a statement to the jury during the sentencing phase retrial of Jodi Arias at Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix on Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014. Arias was found guilty of first degree murder in the death of former boyfriend Travis Alexander, but the jury hung on the penalty phase, life in prison or the death sentence. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic,David Wallace, Pool)
Judge Sherry Stephens rules that the courtroom must be cleared of everyone except for the victims and defendants' families for the next witnesses testimony during the sentencing phase retrial of Jodi Arias at Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix on Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014. Stephens said the next witness was crucial to the sentencing trial and they wouldn't take the stand if it were public. Arias was found guilty of first degree murder in the death of former boyfriend Travis Alexander, but the jury hung on the penalty phase, life in prison or the death sentence. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, David Wallace, Pool)
Travis Alexander's brother Steven ALexander, reads a statement to the jury during the sentencing phase retrial of Jodi Arias at Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix on Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014. Arias was found guilty of first degree murder in the death of former boyfriend Travis Alexander, but the jury hung on the penalty phase, life in prison or the death sentence. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, David Wallace, Pool)
Jodi Arias, right, looks toward the gallery as her defense attorney, Jennifer Willmott, sits at left, during her sentencing retrial at Maricopa County Superior Court, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014, in Phoenix. Arias was found guilty of first degree murder last year in the death of former boyfriend Travis Alexander, but the jury hung on the sentencing phase, unable to choose life in prison or a death sentence. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle, Pool)
Defense attorney Kirk Nurmi makes his opening statement in the Jodi Arias sentencing retrial in the Maricopa County Superior Court room of Judge Sherry Stephens in Phoenix, Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014. Arias was found guilty of first degree murder in the death of former boyfriend Travis Alexander, but the jury deadlocked on whether to give her the death penalty or life in prison. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle, Pool)
Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Sherry Stephens reads instructions to the jury in Phoenix, Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, as the penalty phase of the Jodi Arias retrial begins. Arias was found guilty of first degree murder in the death of former boyfriend Travis Alexander, but the jury deadlocked on whether to give her the death penalty or life in prison. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle, Pool)
FILE - In this Feb. 20, 2013 file photo, defendant Jodi Arias testifies about killing Travis Alexander in 2008 during her murder trial in Phoenix. Authorities plan to try again to secure the death penalty for convicted murderer Arias after jurors in her trial deadlocked in May on a sentence. Arias was convicted of murder May 8 in the 2008 killing of boyfriend Travis Alexander at his suburban Phoenix home. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Charlie Leight, Pool, File)
Jodi Arias sits in the Maricopa County Superior Court room of Judge Sherry Stephens in Phoenix, Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, as the opening statements in her penalty phase retrial begins. The 34-year-old Arias was convicted of murder last year, but the first jury was deadlocked on whether to give her the death penalty or life in prison. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle, Pool)
In this Jan. 9, 2013 file photo, Jodi Arias appears for her trial in Maricopa County Superior court in Phoenix. A judge ruled in an order made public Tuesday, May 27, 2014, that Arias' upcoming retrial will not be televised live as occurred during her first trial. The 33-year-old former waitress was convicted of first-degree murder in May for the 2008 killing of her one-time boyfriend in Arizona, but jurors couldn't reach a decision on a sentence. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
Convicted killer Jodi Arias pauses while answering a question during an interview at the Maricopa County Estrella Jail on Tuesday, May 21, 2013, in Phoenix. Arias was convicted recently of killing her former boyfriend Travis Alexander in his suburban Phoenix home back in 2008, and could face the possibility of the death penalty as the sentencing phase of her trial continues. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
Convicted killer Jodi Arias makes a point as she answers a question during an interview at the Maricopa County Estrella Jail on Tuesday, May 21, 2013, in Phoenix. Arias was convicted recently of killing her former boyfriend Travis Alexander in his suburban Phoenix home back in 2008, made a plea in court for life in prison, instead of execution, saying she can contribute to society if allowed to live. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
FOR USE AS DESIRED, YEAR END PHOTOS - FILE - Convicted killer Jodi Arias pauses for a moment during an interview at the Maricopa County Estrella Jail on Tuesday, May 21, 2013, in Phoenix. Arias was convicted of killing her former boyfriend Travis Alexander in his suburban Phoenix home back in 2008. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
Convicted killer Jodi Arias makes a point while answering a question during an interview at the Maricopa County Estrella Jail on Tuesday, May 21, 2013, in Phoenix. Arias was convicted recently of killing her former boyfriend Travis Alexander in his suburban Phoenix home back in 2008, and could face the possibility of the death penalty as the sentencing phase of her trial continues. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
FILE - In this July 16, 2013 file photo, convicted murderer Jodi Arias appears for a hearing in Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix. Arias’ attorneys want a judge to allow them to monitor the Twitter accounts of jurors seated in her murder trial to be certain panelists aren’t communicating details about the case until the proceedings are concluded, according to a motion filed Wednesday Aug. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Mark Henle, Pool, File)
Jodi Arias stands as the jury enters the courtroom on Wednesday, May 22, 2013 during the penalty phase of her murder trial at Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix. The jury deciding whether Arias should be sentenced to life in prison or death resumes deliberations Thursday, a day after reaching an impasse and being told to keep trying. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Rob Schumacher, Pool)
Jodi Arias listens as the verdict for sentencing is read for her first degree murder conviction at Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix, Ariz., on Thursday, May 23, 2013. The jury in Jodi Arias' trial was dismissed Thursday after failing to reach a unanimous decision on whether the woman they convicted of murdering her one-time boyfriend should be sentenced to life or death in a case that has captured headlines worldwide with its sex, lies, violence. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, David Wallace, Pool)
Members of the media surround David Hughes, middle, a friend of Travis Alexander's, as spectators look on after a guilty verdict in the murder trial of Jodi Arias, Wednesday, May 8, 2013 in Phoenix. Arias was convicted of first-degree murder Wednesday in the 2009 killing of her one-time boyfriend Travis Alexander after a four-month trial. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
Spectators react to a guilty verdict in the murder trial of Jodi Arias, Wednesday, May 8, 2013 in Phoenix. Arias was convicted of first-degree murder Wednesday in the 2009 killing of her one-time boyfriend Travis Alexander after a four-month trial. (AP Photo/Matt York)
Spectators wait outside Superior Court in Phoenix, Wednesday, May 8, 2013 for a verdict in the trial of Jodi Arias, a waitress and aspiring photographer charged with killing her boyfriend, Travis Alexander, in Arizona in 2008. The four month trial included graphic details of their sexual escapades and photos of Alexander just after his death. (AP Photo/Matt York)
From left; Virginia Aguiar, Jane Crook, Nisha Kataria, and Debbie Lambert all react in Phoenix, Wednesday, May 8, 2013 to a guilty verdict in the trial of Jodi Arias, a waitress and aspiring photographer charged with killing her boyfriend, Travis Alexander, in Arizona in 2008. The four month trial included graphic details of their sexual escapades and photos of Alexander just after his death. (AP Photo/Matt York)
U.S. Marshals and Maricopa County Sheriff's Deputies block the entrance to Superior Court as spectators wait for a verdict in the murder trial of Jodi Arias, Wednesday, May 8, 2013 in Phoenix. Arias was convicted of first-degree murder Wednesday in the 2009 killing of her one-time boyfriend Travis Alexander after a four-month trial. (AP Photo/Matt York)
Convicted killer Jodi Arias listens to a question before answering during an interview at the Maricopa County Estrella Jail on Tuesday, May 21, 2013, in Phoenix. Arias was convicted recently of killing her former boyfriend Travis Alexander in his suburban Phoenix home back in 2008, and could face the possibility of the death penalty as the sentencing phase of her trial continues. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
Jodi Arias addresses the jury on Tuesday, May 21, 2013, during the penalty phase of her murder trial at Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix. Arias was convicted of first-degree murder in the stabbing and shooting to death of Travis Alexander in his suburban Phoenix home in June 2008. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Rob Schumacher, Pool)
Jodi Arias looks at the family of Travis Alexander as the jury arrives on Wednesday, May 15, 2013, during the sentencing phase of her trial at Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix. If the jury finds aggravating factors in her crime, Arias could be sentenced to death. Jodi Arias was convicted of first-degree murder in the stabbing and shooting death of Travis Alexander, 30, in his suburban Phoenix home in June 2008. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Rob Schumacher, Pool)
Jodi Arias looks at her family after being found of guilty of first-degree murder in the gruesome killing of her one-time boyfriend, Travis Alexander, in their suburban Phoenix home, Wednesday, May 8, 2013, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Rob Schumacher, Pool)
FILE - In this March 7, 2013 file photo, Jodi Arias answers written questions from the jury in Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix during her trial for the 2008 killing of her boyfriend, Travis Alexander. Psychologist Richard Samuels, who diagnosed Arias with post-traumatic stress disorder and amnesia, returns to the witness stand for a sixth day of testimony Monday, March 25, 2013. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle, Pool, File)
Jodi Arias, left, demonstrates how she had her arm around her sister in a photograph that had been admitted into evidence Monday March 4, 2013 in Phoenix. She put her arm around defense attorney Jennifer Willmott during redirect from defense attorney Kirk Nurmi. Arias is on trial for the murder of Travis Alexander in 2008. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle, POOL )
A friend of the Alexander family reacts as the sentencing for the first degree murder conviction of Jodi Arias is declared a hung jury at Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix, Ariz., on Thursday, May 23, 2013. The jury in Jodi Arias’ murder trial was dismissed Thursday after failing to reach a verdict against the woman they convicted of murdering her one-time boyfriend in a case that captured headlines worldwide with its sex, lies, violence. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, David Wallace, Pool)
Convicted killer Jodi Arias speaks during an interview at the Maricopa County Estrella Jail on Tuesday, May 21, 2013, in Phoenix. Arias was convicted recently of killing her former boyfriend Travis Alexander in his suburban Phoenix home back in 2008, made a plea for life in prison, instead of execution, saying she can contribute to society if allowed to live. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
Judge Sherry Stephens listens to defense attorney Kirk Nurmi during closing arguments during Jodi Arias' murder trial on Friday, May 3, 2013 at Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix. Arias is charged with first-degree murder in the stabbing and shooting death of Travis Alexander, 30, in his suburban Phoenix home in June 2008. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Rob Schumacher, Pool)
Defendant Jodi Arias shows the jury her deformed finger during cross examination by prosecutor Juan Martinez in Maricopa County Superior Court, Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013 in Phoenix. Arias, 32, faces a potential death sentence if convicted of first-degree murder in the June 2008 killing of Travis Alexander in his suburban Phoenix home. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle, Pool)
May 08, 2013 - Riverside, California, U.S. - The headstone for Travis Alexander at Olivewood Cemetary in Riverside, marks the spot where his body lies. The killing of Travis Alexander occurred on June 4, 2008, at his home in Mesa, Arizona. Alexander's injuries consisted of multiple stab wounds, a slit throat, and a shot to the head, the medical examiner ruled his death a homicide. Jodi Arias, Alexander's ex-girlfriend, was charged with his murder, and her trial began on January 2, 2013. Arias testified that she killed Alexander in self-defense. The verdict in the trial of Arias is due at 4:30
May 08, 2013 - Riverside, California, U.S. - An unidentified woman places flowers and grieves at the headstone of murder victim Travis Alexander at Olivewood Cemetery in Riverside, on Tuesday, May 8, 2013 the day Travis's ex-girlfriend Jodi Arias received a 1st degree murder verdict for his death. Arias was convicted of stabbing and shooting to death Travis Alexander, 30, in his suburban Phoenix home in June 2008. (Credit Image: © Steven K. Doi/ZUMAPRESS.com)
Carol Peifer, of Glendale, Ariz., places a sign in front of Maricopa County Superior Court as she and dozens of other spectators wait for a verdict in the Jodi Arias murder trial, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, in Phoenix. A Phoenix jury is on its third day of deliberations in the trial of Jodi Arias, who is accused of murdering her one-time boyfriend Travis Alexander, in Arizona. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
Jodi Arias answers written questions from the jury during her murder trial, Wednesday, March 6, 2013 in Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix. Arias is on trial for the 2008 murder of Travis Alexander. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle, Pool)
Defendant Jodi Arias loses her composure as she testifies about killing Travis Alexander in 2008 during her murder trial at Judge Sherry Stephens' Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix on Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013. Arias is charged in the 2008 stabbing and shooting death of her lover, Alexander. She faces the death penalty if convicted of first-degree murder. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Charlie Leight, Pool)
Jodi Arias breaks down after being asked by prosecutor Juan Martinez if she was crying when she stabbed Travis Alexander and when she slit his throat, during cross examination at Arias' murder trial on Thursday, Feb. 28, 2013 in Phoenix. Arias, 32, is charged in the June 2008 killing her lover, Alexander, in his suburban Phoenix home. She says she was forced to fight for her life after Alexander attacked her, but police say she planned the killing in a jealous rage. Arias initially told authorities she had nothing to do with Alexander's death, then later blamed it on masked intruders before eventually settling on self-defense. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle, Pool)
Jodi Arias breaks down after being asked by prosecutor Juan Martinez if she was crying when she stabbed Travis Alexander and when she slit his throat, during cross examination at Arias' murder trial on Thursday, Feb. 28, 2013 in Phoenix. Arias, 32, is charged in the June 2008 killing her lover, Alexander, in his suburban Phoenix home. She says she was forced to fight for her life after Alexander attacked her, but police say she planned the killing in a jealous rage. Arias initially told authorities she had nothing to do with Alexander's death, then later blamed it on masked intruders before eventually settling on self-defense. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle, Pool)
Jodi Arias breaks down after being asked by prosecutor Juan Martinez if she was crying when she stabbed Travis Alexander and when she slit his throat, during cross examination at Arias' murder trial on Thursday, Feb. 28, 2013 in Phoenix. Arias, 32, is charged in the June 2008 killing her lover, Alexander, in his suburban Phoenix home. She says she was forced to fight for her life after Alexander attacked her, but police say she planned the killing in a jealous rage. Arias initially told authorities she had nothing to do with Alexander's death, then later blamed it on masked intruders before eventually settling on self-defense. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Tom Tingle, Pool)
Jodi Arias stands next to her lawyers at her trial, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013 in Phoenix. Jodi Arias is accused of fatally shooting and stabbing Travis Alexander in June 2008 at his Mesa home.(AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Michael Schennum, Pool)
Judge Sherry Stephens listens to defendant Jodi Arias testify about killing Travis Alexander in 2008 during Arias' murder trial in Maricopa County Superior Court in Phoenix on Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013. Arias is charged in the 2008 stabbing and shooting death of her lover, Alexander. She faces the death penalty if convicted of first-degree murder. (AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Charlie Leight, Pool)
Chris Hughes, left, a friend of Travis Alexander, hugs Mikal Ann Dillon in front of Maricopa County Superior Court after a judge sentenced Jodi Arias to life in prison without the possibility of release for the murder of Alexander, Monday, April 13, 2015, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
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PHOENIX (AP) - It took just one juror to spare the life of convicted murderer Jodi Arias on Thursday - and the woman had to survive an attempt by her colleagues to boot her from the jury before she could do it.

In the end, the jury voted 11-1 in favor of death - not enough to send Arias to death row in the case that became a global sensation with its tawdry revelations about her sexual relationship with the victim and that she had slit his throat so deeply that he was nearly decapitated.

The deadlock took the death penalty off the table and left a judge to decide whether to sentence Arias to life in prison or to life with the possibility of release after 25 years. That decision is expected at an April 13 hearing.

Arias was convicted in 2013 of killing her lover, Travis Alexander, but that jury also deadlocked on her punishment, prompting the sentencing retrial that began in October.

The holdout juror did not speak to the media on Thursday. But other jurors said they thought Arias lacked remorse and that her attorneys had presented an inaccurate portrait Alexander.

The jurors did not elaborate but during the trial, defense lawyers said Alexander had used Arias to quench his sexual urges, called her demeaning names and told her she was soulless.

Most of the jurors said they believed the holdout was biased and opposed to giving the death penalty. The other jurors asked the judge on Tuesday if the woman could be replaced with an alternate, but the request was denied and jury was told to keep deliberating.

One male juror said Thursday that he became angry when the holdout indicated the death penalty would be a form of revenge. Jurors also note that the woman had acknowledged seeing a cable TV movie about the Arias case.

Jurors apologized to the Alexander family for the deadlock and said they felt Arias was trying to manipulate the jury.

None of the jurors would give their names. The identities of jurors are kept secret in Arizona.

The jury deliberated for about 26 hours over five days. They said they started with about half of the members voting for the death penalty, eventually reached the 11-1 vote then got stuck.

They described having knots in their stomachs and problems sleeping at night during the trial.

Arias will begin serving her sentence in a 12-by-7 foot cell in a maximum-security unit at the Perryville prison for women, west of downtown Phoenix.

If officials deem her behavior is good over time, she could be moved to a medium security unit.

Nearly $3 million of taxpayer money was spent during both trials. Arias' court-appointed attorneys billed the state for $2.7 million. Prosecutors say they spent more than $132,000 on expert witnesses, transcripts, travel expense and other costs, though that figure doesn't include the salary of the prosecutor.

Prosecutors said they don't regret trying again to send Arias to death row.

"Regret is a place in the past I can't afford to live in," Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery said.

Alexander's family members wept when the judge announced the deadlock. His brothers and sisters said in a statement that they "are saddened by the jury's inability to reach a decision on the death penalty, however, we understand the difficulty of the decision, and have nothing but respect for the jury's time."

Defense attorney Kirk Nurmi said the killing was a tragedy and "no verdict ultimately could repair that sadness."

Prosecutors say Arias killed Alexander as revenge because he wanted to date other women and was planning a trip to Mexico with his latest love interest.

Authorities said Arias shot him in the head and stabbed and slashed him nearly 30 times then left his body in his shower at his suburban Phoenix home, where friends found him about five days later.

During closing arguments in the penalty retrial, prosecutor Juan Martinez repeatedly showed jurors gruesome crime scene photos of the victim's slit throat.

The images were a counterpoint to the happy photos of Arias that her attorney displayed in arguing there was more to her life than her actions in the killing.

Nurmi told jurors that Arias deserved a second chance because she was the victim of verbal and physical abuse throughout her life.

Arias initially courted the spotlight after her arrest, granting interviews to "48 Hours" and "Inside Edition."

She testified for 18 days at her first trial, describing her abusive childhood, cheating boyfriends, relationship with Alexander and her contention that he was physically abusive.

___

Associated Press writer Paul Davenport contributed to this article.
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