Congress resolves to flee DC pre-snow

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Congress resolves to flee DC pre-snow
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 26: Snow falls on the U.S. Captiol as another winters storm covers most of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern States with several inches of frozen precipitation February 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. The morning commute was slowed, the U.S. government delayed the start of the workday by two hours and many schools were closed in the capital region. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
12:57PM ET 03.04.15 Meteorologist Ari Sarsalari talks about winter storm Thor's impact as the massive storm moves across the country, bringing ice, snow, and heavy rain this week.
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 26: Snow falls on the U.S. Captiol as another winters storm covers most of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern States with several inches of frozen precipitation February 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. The morning commute was slowed, the U.S. government delayed the start of the workday by two hours and many schools were closed in the capital region. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
MCLEAN, VA - February 23: A view of the snow capped rocks and ice formations at Great Falls National Park on a frigid February 23, 2015 in McLean, Va. The Weather Service said temperatures would be 15 to 25 degrees below average for most of the East Coast west to the Great Lakes and lower Mississippi River Valley. (Photo by Kate Patterson for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 26: A snow sweeper moves across the plaza in front of the U.S. Captiol as another winters storm covers most of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern States with several inches of frozen precipitation February 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. The morning commute was slowed, the U.S. government delayed the start of the workday by two hours and many schools were closed in the capital region. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 22: Snow turns to slush along Maryland avenue by the US Capitol a day after heavy accumulation on February, 22, 2015 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
RESTON, VA - FEBRUARY 21 Under heavy snowfall, Lindsay Crutcher shovels her driveway on Saturday, February 21, 2015, in Reston, VA. (Photo by Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
MCLEAN, VA - February 23: A view of the snow capped rocks and ice formations at Great Falls National Park on a frigid February 23, 2015 in McLean, Va. The Weather Service said temperatures would be 15 to 25 degrees below average for most of the East Coast west to the Great Lakes and lower Mississippi River Valley. (Photo by Kate Patterson for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
TAKOMA PARK, MARYLAND - FEBRUARY 21: A snowplow makes its way down Carroll Ave. in Takoma Park, Maryland. A winter storm warning hit the Washington, DC area on Saturday, February 21, 2015. Pedestrians slogged through the snow as cars slid off the road in the dangerous driving conditions. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 21: Carlos Lopez, 6, of DC, runs through the snow as the rest of his family stands at a bus stop at the Takoma Park Metro waiting for a bus to Langley Park, Maryland. The buses were delayed because of the snow. A winter storm warning hit the Washington, DC area on Saturday, February 21, 2015. Pedestrians slogged through the snow as cars slid off the road in the dangerous driving conditions. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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WASHINGTON (AP) - Nothing gets Congress moving like the forecast of snow.

The House, followed by the Senate Wednesday, reached rare bipartisan agreement on the desire of lawmakers to beat a forecasted snowstorm out of town. The town being Washington, D.C., where anything white falling from the sky disrupts schools, the federal government, air traffic and roads. Congress wants no part of the chaos, at least this week, when up to eight inches is forecast to fall on the region early Thursday morning.

Better, the House resolved Tuesday, to pass a funding bill for the Department of Homeland Security and adjourn. The Senate Wednesday concurred, calling a vote to override President Barack Obama's veto of legislation to build the Keystone XL pipeline.

Senate leaders set the last vote of the week for 2:30 p.m. Wednesday. But that wasn't good enough for Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., known as the chamber's most vocal denier of man-made climate change.

"Is there any way you could change that to 2:20 from 2:30?" Inhofe asked on the Senate floor. "There are four people who can't make planes, otherwise."

With no objection from minority Democrats, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell agreed.

"So for the information of all senators, the vote on the veto override will occur at 2:20 and senators should be in the chamber and prepared to vote from their seats," the Kentucky Republican announced. "This will be the last roll call vote of the week."

The House announced a day earlier that it would be out of session Thursday and Friday, in advance of a home district work session next week.

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