Best Jobs in Health Care For 2015

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Radiographer applying pressure to abdominal region to get clearer picture from ultrasound
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By Eric Gilpin, president, staffing and health care, CareerBuilder

In the wake of the recession, health care has led the march toward economic recovery, and we will likely see this industry's rapid pace of growth continue in 2015. With the number of baby boomers in need of medical care on the rise, the coming year looks very promising for workers going into the health care field.

To put it in perspective, 28 health care jobs are projected to grow by at least 3 percent in 2015 - that's more than twice the projected growth of the overall U.S. workforce (1.2 percent). What's more, this growth will take place largely among high-earning jobs. Seventeen of those 28 jobs have median hourly earnings greater than $20 per hour.

CareerBuilder and MiracleWorkers.com put together a list of some of the best health care jobs for 2015. The list reflects how recent technological advancements will create high demand for specialized jobs, and how the needs of the aging baby boomer generation will continue to impact hiring in jobs related to their treatment and care.

The list was compiled based on projected percentage changes between 2014 and 2015, number of current jobs and median hourly earnings.

Occupational therapy assistants: Help patients develop, recover and improve the skills needed for daily living and working. Directly involved in providing therapy to patients.*

  • 2014 jobs: 31,690
  • 2014-2015 percent change: 5 percent
  • Median hourly earnings: $26.75

Physical therapist assistants: Work under the direction and supervision of physical therapists. Help patients who are recovering from injuries and illnesses regain movement and manage pain.

  • 2014 jobs: 74,844
  • 2014-2015 percent change: 4.8 percent
  • Median hourly earnings: $25.79

Diagnostic medical sonographers: Specialize in creating images, known as sonograms or ultrasounds, of the body's organs and tissues. Sonograms are often the first imaging test performed when disease is suspected. Diagnostic medical sonographers may work closely with physicians or surgeons before, during and after procedures.

  • 2014 jobs: 60,626
  • 2014-2015 percent change: 4.8 percent
  • Median hourly earnings: $32.44

Genetic counselors: Assess individual or family risk for a variety of inherited conditions, such as genetic disorders and birth defects. Provide information and advice to other health care providers or to individuals and families concerned with the risk of inherited conditions.

  • 2014 jobs: 2,482
  • 2014-2015 percent change: 4.5 percent
  • Median hourly earnings: $29.75

Nurse practitioners: Serve as primary and specialty care providers, providing advanced nursing services to patients and their families. Assess patients, determine the best method to improve or manage a patient's health and discuss ways to integrate health promotion strategies into a patient's life. They typically care for a certain population of people (e.g., adult and geriatric health, pediatric health or psychiatric and mental health).

  • 2014 jobs: 118,477
  • 2014-2015 percent change: 3.8 percent
  • Median hourly earnings: $45.20

As recent technological advancements become more widespread and allow more medical facilities to offer new services and treatments to their patients, the demand for skilled health care workers will continue to grow. And as a larger portion of the population ages and begins to require care, health care will continue to be at the forefront of economic recovery.

Looking for more growing health care jobs? Take a look at the full report.

*Job descriptions from the Bureau of Labor Statistics
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