Powdered alcohol could soon hit shelves

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Powdered Alcohol Could Soon Hit The Shelves

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (WREG) -- Powered alcohol, a controversial product, may be hitting stores soon. Three states are so worried about it they've already banned the product, and there's talk Tennessee may as well.

"Palcohol is a revolutionary product that has so many positive uses," Mark Phillips, the creator of Palcohol, says in a YouTube video.

It's exactly how it sounds: alcohol in a powered form that you add liquid to.

Palcohol is not on the market yet, but according to the website, it could be by spring of this year.

However before it's even hit shelves, there's already doubt circulating.

Those who are against the Palcohol say would it be easier for Palcohol to get into the wrong hands, particularly minors. There are also questions about how it would be regulated.

Phillips addressed these concerns in the Youtube video.

"People imagined how it would be used, it was reported that Palcohol will make it easier to get drunk, by snorting it, easier to spike someone's drink and easier for kids to get a hold of it, all of those statements couldn't be further from the truth," he says.

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Powdered alcohol could soon hit shelves
Photo credit: WREG
Photo credit: WREG
Photo credit: WREG
Photo credit: WREG
Photo credit: WREG
Photo credit: WREG
Photo credit: WREG
Photo credit: WREG

"I never heard of that in my life," Alisha Govan, a mom of a 4-year-old, said.

She said the idea makes her a little uneasy because kids are always getting into things.

"They will think it's just some powder they put on after the tub, or just something laying around the house, not knowing that it's liquor or alcohol or something that can damage your insides," Govan said.

Law enforcement said right now this is a grey area, so for now they're playing the wait-and-see game.

"We'll have to see kinda how it all breaks down and once we figure that part out or the state figures that part out, then we'll do our job to enforce it the best we can," Chip Washington with the Shelby County Sheriff's Office said.

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