GOP: House to vote on Homeland bill without conditions

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...

28 PHOTOS
DHS Congress shutdown - video in slide 1 - updated 3/3
See Gallery
GOP: House to vote on Homeland bill without conditions
Congress has passed legislation that will fund the Department of Homeland Security without touching President Obama's immigration actions, bringing an end to a months-long battle that threatened to shut down an agency tasked with helping protect the U.S. against terrorist threats. In a 257 to 167 vote, the House passed a "clean" Homeland Security funding bill on Tuesday without provisions that would curtail the president's executive orders on immigration.
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 27: House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) walks through the House side of the US Capitol February 27, 2015 in Washington, DC. Later today the House will vote on a three week continuing resolution for funding the Department of Homeland Security. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, walks to the chamber as the House failed to advance a short-term funding measure to keep the Department of Homeland Security funded past a midnight deadline, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday evening, Feb. 27, 2015. Conservatives in Speaker Boehner's own party fought against three-week funding measure because it would not overturn Obama’s actions on immigration. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 27: Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., speaks during the Senate Democrats' news conference to urge Speaker Boehner bring the fully funded DHS bill up for a vote in the House on Friday, Feb. 27, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 27: Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del., speaks during the Senate Democrats' news conference to urge Speaker Boehner bring the fully funded DHS bill up for a vote in the House on Friday, Feb. 27, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 27: From left, Sen. Thomas Carper, D-Del., Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., participate in the Senate Democrats' news conference to urge Speaker Boehner bring the fully funded DHS bill up for a vote in the House on Friday, Feb. 27, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agent waits as a group of undocumented men, not pictured, are deported to Mexico at the U.S.-Mexico border in San Diego, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is nearing a partial shutdown as the agency's funding is set to expire Friday -- something Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had said wouldn't happen on his watch. Photographer: David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agent removes handcuffs from undocumented men being deported to Mexico at the U.S.-Mexico border in San Diego, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is nearing a partial shutdown as the agency's funding is set to expire Friday -- something Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had said wouldn't happen on his watch. Photographer: David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agent waits as a group of undocumented men, not pictured, are deported to Mexico at the U.S.-Mexico border in San Diego, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is nearing a partial shutdown as the agency's funding is set to expire Friday -- something Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had said wouldn't happen on his watch. Photographer: David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A U.S. Border Patrol agents stands outside his vehicle next to the U.S.-Mexico border fence in San Diego, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is nearing a partial shutdown as the agency's funding is set to expire Friday -- something Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had said wouldn't happen on his watch. Photographer: David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agent directs a group of undocumented men being deported to Mexico at the U.S.-Mexico border in San Diego, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is nearing a partial shutdown as the agency's funding is set to expire Friday -- something Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had said wouldn't happen on his watch. Photographer: David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents speak as an undocumented man is being deported to Mexico at the U.S.-Mexico border in San Diego, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is nearing a partial shutdown as the agency's funding is set to expire Friday -- something Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had said wouldn't happen on his watch. Photographer: David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A United States Border Patrol agent rides an ATV vehicle a few hundred meters north of the U.S.-Mexico border on February 26, 2015 in San Diego, California, USA. In the background is the city of Tijuana, Mexico. (David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
A U.S. Border Patrol agents stands outside his vehicle next to the U.S.-Mexico border fence in San Diego, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is nearing a partial shutdown as the agency's funding is set to expire Friday -- something Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had said wouldn't happen on his watch. Photographer: David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agent waits as an undocumented man is received by Mexican immigration at the U.S.-Mexico border in San Diego, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is nearing a partial shutdown as the agency's funding is set to expire Friday -- something Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had said wouldn't happen on his watch. Photographer: David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Jeh Johnson, U.S. secretary of Homeland Security (DHS), center, speaks during a news conference with former secretaries of Homeland Security Tom Ridge, right, and Michael Chertoff, at the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015. Financing for the DHS is set to lapse after Friday and the agency would face a partial shutdown unless Congress provides new money. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Jeh Johnson, U.S. secretary of Homeland Security (DHS), speaks during a news conference with former secretaries of Homeland Security Tom Ridge and Michael Chertoff, not pictured, at the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015. Financing for the DHS is set to lapse after Friday and the agency would face a partial shutdown unless Congress provides new money. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) sign stands at Ronald Reagan National Airport (DCA) in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015. Financing for the DHS is set to lapse after Friday and the agency would face a partial shutdown unless Congress provides new money. More than 200,000 government employees deemed essential at DHS, including Transportation Security Administration (TSA) officers, would still have to report to their posts, even though their pay would stop unless Congress finds a solution. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, walks to the chamber as the House failed to advance a short-term funding measure to keep the Department of Homeland Security funded past a midnight deadline, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday evening, Feb. 27, 2015. Conservatives in Speaker Boehner's own party fought against three-week funding measure because it would not overturn Obama’s actions on immigration. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
From left, Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y. and Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del. participate in a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, to appeal for a long-term clean funding bill for the Homeland Security Department just hours before a shutdown was to begin. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md., leaves the chamber after lawmakers failed to advance a short-term funding measure to keep the Department of Homeland Security funded past a midnight deadline, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday evening, Feb. 27, 2015. GOP conservatives in Speaker Boehner's party fought against the three-week funding measure because it would not overturn Obama’s actions on immigration. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Rep. Walter B. Jones, R-N.C., holds up a copy of the Constitution while talking to reporters as House Republicans emerge from a closed-door meeting on how to deal with the impasse over the Homeland Security budget, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. GOP lawmakers have been trying to block President Barack Obama's executive actions on immigration through the funding for the DHS which expires Friday night. Sounding retreat, House Republicans agreed Thursday night to push short-term funding to prevent a partial shutdown at the Department of Homeland Security while leaving in place Obama administration immigration policies they have vowed to repeal. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 27: House Minority Leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), at center, reads a letter she sent to colleagues in congress, urging support for a DHS stopgap funding bill, during a news conference with Democratic leaders including, from left, Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-MD), Rep. Joseph Crowley (D-NY) and Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) at the U.S. Capitol on February 27, 2015 in Washington, DC. The House failed earlier today to pass a 20-day stopgap bill to fund the Department of Homeland Security, after previous Senate and House versions of DHS funding bills were rejected by the other chamber, threatening to shut down the deparment with no clear resolution. (Photo by T.J. Kirkpatrick/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 27: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., walks to the Senate floor for the votes on funding the Department of Homeland Security on Friday, Feb. 27, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 27: The U.S. Capitol is seen at dusk as the U.S. Congress struggles to find a solution to fund the Department of Homeland Security on February 27, 2015 in Washington, DC. The DHS budget is set to expire at midnight this evening after the House of Representatives failed to pass a short term funding bill earlier today. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 27: House Minority Leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), at center, reads a letter she sent to colleagues in congress, urging support for a DHS stopgap funding bill, during a news conference with Democratic leaders including, from left, Rep. Xavier Becerra (D-CA), Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-MD), Rep. Joseph Crowley (D-NY) and Rep. Steve Israel (D-NY) at the U.S. Capitol on February 27, 2015 in Washington, DC. The House failed earlier today to pass a 20-day stopgap bill to fund the Department of Homeland Security, after previous Senate and House versions of DHS funding bills were rejected by the other chamber, threatening to shut down the deparment with no clear resolution. (Photo by T.J. Kirkpatrick/Getty Images)
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi on Friday called on fellow Drmocrats to support the one-week stopgap funding bill. The U.S. Senate on Friday approved a the bill to avert a partial shutdown at midnight of the U.S. domestic security agency, leaving it up to the House of Representatives to either approve the bill or let the shutdown go ahead.
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

WASHINGTON (AP) - In a major victory for President Barack Obama, the Republican-led House relented on Tuesday and will back legislation to fund the Homeland Security Department through the end of the budget year, without restrictions on immigration.

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, outlined the dwindling options for his deeply divided GOP caucus on Tuesday morning after the Senate left the House with little choice. Boehner pointed out that the issue is now in the hands of the courts.

"I am as outraged and frustrated as you at the lawless and unconstitutional actions of this president," Boehner told his caucus, according to aides. "I believe this decision - considering where we are - is the right one for this team, and the right one for this country."

Conservatives had demanded that the funding bill roll back Obama's immigration directives from last fall. He signed orders sparing millions of immigrants from deportation. Democrats had insisted on legislation to fund the department, which shares responsibility for anti-terrorism operations, without any conditions.

The GOP leadership's decision angered several conservatives.

"This is the signal of capitulation," said Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa. "The mood of this thing is such that to bring it back from the abyss is very difficult."

But more pragmatic Republicans welcomed Boehner's move.

"Sanity is prevailing. I do give John Boehner credit," said Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y.

A vote could occur as early as Tuesday. Short-term funding for the department expires on Friday at midnight.

A federal court ruling has temporarily blocked the administration from implementing the new immigration rules. The administration has appealed the decision and the ultimate result of the legal challenge is unknown.

Passage of the stand-alone spending bill would seal the failure of a Republican strategy designed to make Homeland Security funding contingent on concessions from Obama. The department, which has major anti-terrorism responsibilities, is also responsible for border control.

Whatever the final result of the struggle, controversy over the legislation has produced partisan gridlock in the first several weeks of the new Congress, though Republicans gained control of the Senate last fall and won more seats in the House than at any time in 70 years.

Even so, Democratic unity blocked passage in the Senate of House-passed legislation with the immigration provisions. By late last week, a split in House GOP ranks brought the department to the brink of a partial shutdown. That was averted when Congress approved a one-week funding bill that Obama signed into law only moments before a midnight Friday deadline.

More in the news:
Clinton used personal email account as Secretary of State
Mourners view body of slain opposition leader Boris Nemtsov
A year on, what's the latest in the hunt for Flight 370?

Read Full Story

People are Reading