House OKs bill to fund Homeland Security for 1 week

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House OKs bill to fund Homeland Security for 1 week
Congress has passed legislation that will fund the Department of Homeland Security without touching President Obama's immigration actions, bringing an end to a months-long battle that threatened to shut down an agency tasked with helping protect the U.S. against terrorist threats. In a 257 to 167 vote, the House passed a "clean" Homeland Security funding bill on Tuesday without provisions that would curtail the president's executive orders on immigration.
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 27: House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) walks through the House side of the US Capitol February 27, 2015 in Washington, DC. Later today the House will vote on a three week continuing resolution for funding the Department of Homeland Security. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, walks to the chamber as the House failed to advance a short-term funding measure to keep the Department of Homeland Security funded past a midnight deadline, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday evening, Feb. 27, 2015. Conservatives in Speaker Boehner's own party fought against three-week funding measure because it would not overturn Obama’s actions on immigration. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 27: Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., speaks during the Senate Democrats' news conference to urge Speaker Boehner bring the fully funded DHS bill up for a vote in the House on Friday, Feb. 27, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 27: Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del., speaks during the Senate Democrats' news conference to urge Speaker Boehner bring the fully funded DHS bill up for a vote in the House on Friday, Feb. 27, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 27: From left, Sen. Thomas Carper, D-Del., Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., participate in the Senate Democrats' news conference to urge Speaker Boehner bring the fully funded DHS bill up for a vote in the House on Friday, Feb. 27, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agent waits as a group of undocumented men, not pictured, are deported to Mexico at the U.S.-Mexico border in San Diego, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is nearing a partial shutdown as the agency's funding is set to expire Friday -- something Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had said wouldn't happen on his watch. Photographer: David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agent removes handcuffs from undocumented men being deported to Mexico at the U.S.-Mexico border in San Diego, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is nearing a partial shutdown as the agency's funding is set to expire Friday -- something Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had said wouldn't happen on his watch. Photographer: David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agent waits as a group of undocumented men, not pictured, are deported to Mexico at the U.S.-Mexico border in San Diego, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is nearing a partial shutdown as the agency's funding is set to expire Friday -- something Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had said wouldn't happen on his watch. Photographer: David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A U.S. Border Patrol agents stands outside his vehicle next to the U.S.-Mexico border fence in San Diego, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is nearing a partial shutdown as the agency's funding is set to expire Friday -- something Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had said wouldn't happen on his watch. Photographer: David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agent directs a group of undocumented men being deported to Mexico at the U.S.-Mexico border in San Diego, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is nearing a partial shutdown as the agency's funding is set to expire Friday -- something Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had said wouldn't happen on his watch. Photographer: David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents speak as an undocumented man is being deported to Mexico at the U.S.-Mexico border in San Diego, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is nearing a partial shutdown as the agency's funding is set to expire Friday -- something Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had said wouldn't happen on his watch. Photographer: David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A United States Border Patrol agent rides an ATV vehicle a few hundred meters north of the U.S.-Mexico border on February 26, 2015 in San Diego, California, USA. In the background is the city of Tijuana, Mexico. (David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
A U.S. Border Patrol agents stands outside his vehicle next to the U.S.-Mexico border fence in San Diego, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is nearing a partial shutdown as the agency's funding is set to expire Friday -- something Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had said wouldn't happen on his watch. Photographer: David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agent waits as an undocumented man is received by Mexican immigration at the U.S.-Mexico border in San Diego, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is nearing a partial shutdown as the agency's funding is set to expire Friday -- something Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had said wouldn't happen on his watch. Photographer: David Maung/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Jeh Johnson, U.S. secretary of Homeland Security (DHS), center, speaks during a news conference with former secretaries of Homeland Security Tom Ridge, right, and Michael Chertoff, at the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015. Financing for the DHS is set to lapse after Friday and the agency would face a partial shutdown unless Congress provides new money. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Jeh Johnson, U.S. secretary of Homeland Security (DHS), speaks during a news conference with former secretaries of Homeland Security Tom Ridge and Michael Chertoff, not pictured, at the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015. Financing for the DHS is set to lapse after Friday and the agency would face a partial shutdown unless Congress provides new money. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) sign stands at Ronald Reagan National Airport (DCA) in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015. Financing for the DHS is set to lapse after Friday and the agency would face a partial shutdown unless Congress provides new money. More than 200,000 government employees deemed essential at DHS, including Transportation Security Administration (TSA) officers, would still have to report to their posts, even though their pay would stop unless Congress finds a solution. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, walks to the chamber as the House failed to advance a short-term funding measure to keep the Department of Homeland Security funded past a midnight deadline, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday evening, Feb. 27, 2015. Conservatives in Speaker Boehner's own party fought against three-week funding measure because it would not overturn Obama’s actions on immigration. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
From left, Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y. and Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del. participate in a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, to appeal for a long-term clean funding bill for the Homeland Security Department just hours before a shutdown was to begin. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md., leaves the chamber after lawmakers failed to advance a short-term funding measure to keep the Department of Homeland Security funded past a midnight deadline, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday evening, Feb. 27, 2015. GOP conservatives in Speaker Boehner's party fought against the three-week funding measure because it would not overturn Obama’s actions on immigration. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Rep. Walter B. Jones, R-N.C., holds up a copy of the Constitution while talking to reporters as House Republicans emerge from a closed-door meeting on how to deal with the impasse over the Homeland Security budget, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. GOP lawmakers have been trying to block President Barack Obama's executive actions on immigration through the funding for the DHS which expires Friday night. Sounding retreat, House Republicans agreed Thursday night to push short-term funding to prevent a partial shutdown at the Department of Homeland Security while leaving in place Obama administration immigration policies they have vowed to repeal. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 27: House Minority Leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), at center, reads a letter she sent to colleagues in congress, urging support for a DHS stopgap funding bill, during a news conference with Democratic leaders including, from left, Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-MD), Rep. Joseph Crowley (D-NY) and Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) at the U.S. Capitol on February 27, 2015 in Washington, DC. The House failed earlier today to pass a 20-day stopgap bill to fund the Department of Homeland Security, after previous Senate and House versions of DHS funding bills were rejected by the other chamber, threatening to shut down the deparment with no clear resolution. (Photo by T.J. Kirkpatrick/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 27: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., walks to the Senate floor for the votes on funding the Department of Homeland Security on Friday, Feb. 27, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 27: The U.S. Capitol is seen at dusk as the U.S. Congress struggles to find a solution to fund the Department of Homeland Security on February 27, 2015 in Washington, DC. The DHS budget is set to expire at midnight this evening after the House of Representatives failed to pass a short term funding bill earlier today. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 27: House Minority Leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), at center, reads a letter she sent to colleagues in congress, urging support for a DHS stopgap funding bill, during a news conference with Democratic leaders including, from left, Rep. Xavier Becerra (D-CA), Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-MD), Rep. Joseph Crowley (D-NY) and Rep. Steve Israel (D-NY) at the U.S. Capitol on February 27, 2015 in Washington, DC. The House failed earlier today to pass a 20-day stopgap bill to fund the Department of Homeland Security, after previous Senate and House versions of DHS funding bills were rejected by the other chamber, threatening to shut down the deparment with no clear resolution. (Photo by T.J. Kirkpatrick/Getty Images)
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi on Friday called on fellow Drmocrats to support the one-week stopgap funding bill. The U.S. Senate on Friday approved a the bill to avert a partial shutdown at midnight of the U.S. domestic security agency, leaving it up to the House of Representatives to either approve the bill or let the shutdown go ahead.
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WASHINGTON (AP) - Bordering on dysfunction, Congress passed a one-week bill late Friday night to avert a partial shutdown of the Homeland Security Department, as leaders in both political parties quelled a revolt by House conservatives furious that the measure left President Barack Obama's immigration policy intact.

The final vote of a long day and night was a bipartisan 357-60 in the House, a little more than an hour after the Senate cleared the measure without so much as a roll call.

That sent the legislation to the White House for Obama's signature, and capped a day of bruising political battles and rhetoric to match.

"You have made a mess," House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi said at one point to Republicans, as recriminations filled the House chamber and the midnight deadline neared for a partial shutdown of an agency with major anti-terrorism responsibilities.

Even some Republicans readily agreed.

"There are terrorist attacks all over world and we're talking about closing down Homeland Security. This is like living in world of crazy people," tweeted Rep. Peter King of New York, a former chairman of the Homeland Security Committee.

Hours after conservatives joined with Democrats to vote down a three-week funding measure, 224-203, the Senate presented a one-week alternative to keep open the agency, which has responsibility for border control as well as anti-terrorist measures.

That amounted to a take-it-or-leave it offer less than three hours before the deadline.

Some Republican opponents - members of a "Freedom Caucus" - sat together in the chamber as the vote total mounted in the legislation's favor.

This time, Pelosi urged her rank-and-file to support the short-term measure, saying it would lead to passage next week of a bill to fund the agency through the Sept. 30 end of the budget year without immigration add-ons. Aides to Speaker John Boehner promptly said there had been no such promise made.

Taken together, the day's roller-coaster events at the Capitol underscored the difficulty Republicans have had so far this year in translating last fall's election gains into legislative accomplishment - a step its own leaders say is necessary to establish the party's credentials as a responsible, governing party. Republicans gained control of the Senate in November's balloting, and emerged with their largest House majority in more than 70 years.

Further demonstrating GOP woes, House GOP leaders abruptly called off a vote on a major education bill that had attracted significant opposition from conservatives as well as Democrats and the White House. Aides attributed that decision to the need to work separately on rounding up enough votes to pass the funding measure for Homeland Security.

For their part, tea party conservatives in the House unflinchingly defended their actions.

"It does not make any difference whether the funding is for three weeks, three months or a full fiscal year. If it's illegal, it's illegal," said Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala.

He referred to a pair of immigration directives issued by Obama. The first, in 2012, lifted the threat of deportation from many immigrants brought to the country illegally as youngsters. Another order last fall applied to millions more who are in the United States unlawfully.

The unexpected House defeat of a three-week spending bill was accomplished by 52 conservatives upset by the deletion of the immigration provisions, alongside solid opposition from Democrats who wanted the agency funded through Sept. 30.

That set an unpredictable chain of events in motion. Homeland Security officials circulated a lengthy contingency plan indicating that about 30,000 employees could expect to be furloughed without passage of funding legislation.

Then the White House announced Obama had spoken with Pelosi and Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid. Moments later, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky strode onto the Senate floor and swiftly gained approval for the seven-day measure.

The Senate had waited all day to play its part in the funding of the agency.

Earlier, a largely symbolic attempt to advance legislation that would repeal Obama's immigration directive of last fall failed on a vote of 57-42, three short of the 60 required.

That separate proposal was "commonsense legislation that would protect our democracy from the egregious example of executive overreach we saw in November," said McConnell, who successfully led his rank and file in recent days to a decision to pass Homeland Security legislation without immigration-related provisions.

Some House Republicans said the entire strategy of passing a short-term measure and seeking negotiations on a longer-term bill that included changes in Obama's immigration policy was flawed. They noted that Senate Democrats had demonstrated their ability to block any challenges to Obama's immigration policies, and that the president had vowed to veto them in any event.

"Some folks just have a harder time facing political reality than others," said Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa., speaking of other Republicans.

___

Associated Press writers Charles Babington, Andrew Taylor, Matthew Daly and Laurie Kellman contributed to this report.

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