Rare leopard back from the brink

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Rare Leopard Back from the Brink
For anyone who doubts that wildlife conservation can do great things here's a success story for you.

This is the Amur leopard, and over the past eight years the numbers of this beautiful creature have more than doubled in Russia and China. Up from just thirty in 2007 to over sixty today.

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Rare leopard back from the brink
Amur leopard Xembalo looks through the bars of its enclosure at the zoo in Leipzig, Germany, Wednesday April 3, 2013. (AP Photo/dpa,Hendrik Schmidt)
Amur leopard Vatne relaxes in the zoo in Leipzig, Germany, Thursday, March 20, 2014. The zoo will open a new leopard enclosure on Friday, March 21, 2014. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)
Chilka, a four months Amur Leopard, walks around its enclosure at the 'Parc de la Tete d'Or' park in Lyon, on December 27, 2013. The Amur Leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis), a very rare species of leopard living on the borders of Russia and China, is the winner of the 2013 WWF award dedicated to the positive evolution of an endangered species, as its population has increased by 'over 50% over the last five years', according to the Switzerland-based conservation organisation. AFP PHOTO / JEFF PACHOUD (Photo credit should read JEFF PACHOUD/AFP/Getty Images)
Chilka, a four months Amur Leopard, walks around its enclosure at the 'Parc de la Tete d'Or' park in Lyon, on December 27, 2013. The Amur Leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis), a very rare species of leopard living on the borders of Russia and China, is the winner of the 2013 WWF award dedicated to the positive evolution of an endangered species, as its population has increased by 'over 50% over the last five years', according to the Switzerland-based conservation organisation. AFP PHOTO / JEFF PACHOUD (Photo credit should read JEFF PACHOUD/AFP/Getty Images)
An Amur leopard, one of three cubs born on May 5, 2007 at Tallinn Zoo, is seen in its enclosure on July 28, 2009. Scientist believe there are only 35 to 50 Amur leopards still living in the wild.The three extremely rare cubs will have new homes in US and British zoos, the Estonian institution said. AFP PHOTO / RAIGO PAJULA - ESTONIA OUT- (Photo credit should read RAIGO PAJULA/AFP/Getty Images)
Amur Leopard Cub Milena, Marwell Zoo, Hampshire, England, United Kingdom. (Photo by: MyLoupe/UIG via Getty Images)
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"Such a strong rebound in Amur leopard numbers is further proof that even the most critically endangered big cats can recover if we protect their habitat and work together on conservation efforts" said Dr. Barney long, of the World Wildlife Fund.

The turnaround in the cat's numbers is due to the creation of the land of the leopard national park in Russia. The 650,000 acre area was formed in 2012.

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