Woman claims her photo was stolen, used to sell diet pills

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Woman Claims Her Photo Was Stolen to Sell Weight Loss Pills

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - A metro woman is trying to make dieters aware of what she calls a scam. Her weight loss pictures are being used in online ads for a diet pill she's never used. She may not be able to legally get the company to stop using it, so now she's trying to get the word out.

A head-turning figure is what Brandi Wisdom got after losing 34 pounds in five months.

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Woman claims her photo was stolen, used to sell diet pills
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Woman claims her photo was stolen, used to sell diet pills
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"You really have to have a disciplined diet, discipline schedule, disciplined workout. It's a lot of hard work," Wisdom explained.

She motivated dozens of others to do the same, and became quite popular on social media in the process. That's why she calls it "dangerous" that several websites selling Garcinia Cambogia claim she got her buffed body from a bottle.

"It was a slap in the face to Hitch Fit, to myself, to everybody who has been through this program," said Wisdom.

Kansas City's Hitch Fit gym is where her transformation happened four years ago. Owner and founder Micah Lacerte has been working for close to a year to get one of the websites to take Brandi's picture down.

"If their pill was so awesome, why would they be stealing my image to promote it?" Lacerte said.

This past weekend, a woman who took the supplement contacted Lacerte after taking the supplement and not getting the results it promised.

She came across a YouTube video of Lacerte confronting the company who used Wisdom's picture, by phone. Lacerte says what's more disturbing is that there's no way to know exactly what's in that supplement.

"What could be in the pill and what's on the label could be two different things," said Lacerte.

"It is not your answer. Don't be scammed, don't waste your money, do your research," said Wisdom.

A couple of attorneys have weighed in on the issue, and because the posts are coming from overseas, Hitch Fit may not be able to get the company to stop using Wisdom's picture.

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