The land of ice and snow: US blanketed by storm, cold temps

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Snow hits the east coast, DC Feb 2015
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The land of ice and snow: US blanketed by storm, cold temps
11:17AM ET 02.17.15 Meteorologist Ari Sarsalari talks about the timing of winter storm Octavia.
A winter storm that moved through the Mid-Atlantic on Feb. 16 and 17, 2015 extended the northeastern U.S. snowcover farther south. Until this storm hit, southern New Jersey and southeastern Pennsylvania appeared snow-free on satellite imagery from the previous week.
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 17: An impression is left where a person layed down in the snow in Lafayette Park across Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House February 17, 2015 in Washington, DC. The nation's capital area received 4-6 inches of snow overnight as Winter Storm Octavia effected public transportation and shut down the Federal Government. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Shiloh, an Australian Labradoodle, races through new fallen snow Tuesday morning, Feb. 17, 2015, in Cranbury, NJ. Southern and central New Jersey received several inches of snow overnight. (AP Photo/Jim Gerberich)
Amanda Batla and her husband Aaron Batla sled together on the slopped hill on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015, after a winter storm in the Washington area. The season's first major snow storm to blast large parts of the South and dropped up to 8 inches of snow around the Washington area. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
Windshield wipers rise from a snow covered car at Upper Marlboro Ford, Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015, in Upper Marlboro, Md. Several inches of snow fell in the region closing the federal government and area schools. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Karl Zoric, left, and Mark Pipkin, right, both of Annapolis, walk their dogs Chloe and Penny, following a winter storm in Annapolis, Md., Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015. Several inches of snow fell in the region closing the federal government and area schools. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
Snow sits on the Martin Luther King Memorial statue on the National Mall after a winter storm, Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015, in Washington. The season's first major snow storm to blast large parts of the South and dropped up to 8 inches of snow around the Washington area. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
A plow removes snow from the White House driveway after a winter storm, on Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015, in Washington. The season's first major snow storm to blast large parts of the South dropped up to 8 inches of snow around the Washington area. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
A woman walks past ice-covered trees, Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015, in Nashville, Tenn. A snow and ice storm has left many roads difficult to navigate and left many people without power. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Mike Simms of Annapolis, Md., clears snow from his car, Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015, in Annapolis. Several inches of snow fell in the region closing the federal government and area schools. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
Pigeons stand on a frozen lake in a Nashville, Tenn., park, Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015. A snow and ice storm has left many roads difficult to navigate and left many people without power. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
FAIRFAX, VA - FEBRUARY 16: Under heavy snowfall, a lone man waits for a bus on Lee Highway as at least five inches of powdery snow are expected to fall in the DC area on Monday, February 16, 2015, in Fairfax, VA. The heaviest snowfall is expected between midnight and 5am, with as much as 10 inches possible in areas immediately southeast of the nation's capital. (Photo by Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 16: Leora Stewart, right, and her daughter Allaina of Orlando, Fla., left, walk past the National Cathedral on February 16, 2015 in Washington, DC. The Washington, D.C. region his preparing for the biggest snowfall of the year with 5 to 8 inches expected. (Photo by Andrew Harnik for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 16: A man removes the first layer of snow accumulating on the sidewalk along Massachusetts Avenue in Northwest during an upcoming snow storm in Washington, D.C., February 16, 2015. (Photo by Astrid Riecken For The Washington Post via Getty Images)
A man walks in the snow in front of the Iwo Jima memorial in Washington DC on February 16, 2015. The eastern United States braced for an arctic onslaught, as forecasters predicted another blast of snow and cold in what already has been a merciless winter. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
A snow-plough cleans the snow in front of the US Congress building in Washington DC on February 16, 2015. The eastern United States braced for an arctic onslaught, as forecasters predicted another blast of snow and cold in what already has been a merciless winter. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Snow covers the Tidal Basin in front of the Washington Memorial in Washington DC on February 16, 2015. The eastern United States braced for an arctic onslaught, as forecasters predicted another blast of snow and cold in what already has been a merciless winter. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Snow covers the National Mall in front of the Smithsonian Institution Building in Washington DC on February 16, 2015. The eastern United States braced for an arctic onslaught, as forecasters predicted another blast of snow and cold in what already has been a merciless winter. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
A snow-plough cleans the snow on Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House in Washington DC on February 16, 2015. The eastern United States braced for an arctic onslaught, as forecasters predicted another blast of snow and cold in what already has been a merciless winter. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
A snow-plough cleans the snow on Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House in Washington DC on February 16, 2015. The eastern United States braced for an arctic onslaught, as forecasters predicted another blast of snow and cold in what already has been a merciless winter. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Snow falls on an eagle emblem at the Franklin D. Roosevelt memorial in Washington DC on February 16, 2015. The eastern United States braced for an arctic onslaught, as forecasters predicted another blast of snow and cold in what already has been a merciless winter. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 16: Justin Greene, left, helps load snow shovels into a cart for Sundi Stein of Washington, D.C., center, at Ace Hardware in Tenleytown on February 16, 2015 in Washington, DC. The Washington, D.C. region his preparing for the biggest snowfall of the year with 5 to 8 inches expected. (Photo by Andrew Harnik for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 16: Linda McKoy of Washington, D.C., left, buys salt and shovels at Ace Hardware in Tenleytown on February 16, 2015 in Washington, DC. The Washington, D.C. region his preparing for the biggest snowfall of the year with 5 to 8 inches expected. (Photo by Andrew Harnik for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
RESTON, VA - FEBRUARY 16: Under heavy snowfall, Daniyal Maveed of Fairfax waits to have his car towed after sliding out of control on Reston Parkway as at least five inches of powdery snow are expected to fall in the DC area on Monday, February 16, 2015, in Reston, VA. The heaviest snowfall is expected between midnight and 5am, with as much as 10 inches possible in areas immediately southeast of the nation's capital. (Photo by Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 16: Commuters face another winter storm while waiting for their buses at Fort Totten Metro Stop in Washington, D.C., February 16, 2015. (Photo by Astrid Riecken For The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Snow covers the 'The breadline' sculpture at the Franklin D. Roosevelt memorial in Washington DC on February 16, 2015. The eastern United States braced for an arctic onslaught, as forecasters predicted another blast of snow and cold in what already has been a merciless winter. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Snow covers the statue of president Andrew Jackson in Lafayette Square in front of the White House in Washington DC on February 16, 2015. The eastern United States braced for an arctic onslaught, as forecasters predicted another blast of snow and cold in what already has been a merciless winter. AFP PHOTO/ MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 16: Julia Fox of Washington, D.C. wears animal mittens to hold her coffee as light snow falls in Northwest on February 16, 2015 in Washington, DC. The Washington, D.C. region his preparing for the biggest snowfall of the year with 5 to 8 inches expected. (Photo by Andrew Harnik for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 17: A man shovels snow after a snowstorm on the morning of February 17, 2015 in New York City. The city received approximately 3-6 inches of snow overnight. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 17: A woman walks across a bridge during frigidly cold weather on February 17, 2015 in Brooklyn borough of New York City. With temperatures in the teens and the wind chill making it feel below zero, New York City is experiencing some of its coldest weather in years. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 17: A man rides a bicycle walks through slushy and icy streets during frigidly cold weather on February 17, 2015 in New York City. With temperatures in the teens and the wind chill making it feel below zero, New York City is experiencing some of its coldest weather in years. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 16: Solene Odehouri of France bundled up against the cold to tour the sights, including the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial February, 16, 2015 in Washington, DC. Temperatures hoovered in the teens and snow is expected overnight. (Photo by Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 17: A woman walks across a slushy and icy Manhattan street during frigidly cold weather on February 17, 2015 in New York City. With temperatures in the teens and the wind chill making it feel below zero, New York City is experiencing some of its coldest weather in years. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
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DURHAM, N.C. (AP) - A powerful winter storm dumped snow from Nashville to Nantucket, and arctic-like temperatures gripped much of the U.S. and hundreds of thousands of people were without power in the South.

While some people shivered, others bundled up and tried to make the best of a frustrating situation. Here's a look at how people were handling the land of ice, snow and subzero temperatures.

ICE BABY

Some things just won't wait, as Jerry Nuesell can attest.

With his wife 33 weeks pregnant, the couple was headed to the doctor's office when Lisa's contractions led them to UNC Hospitals for the arrival of their first born, a boy.

"Turned out the little fellow was ready to make an appearance much sooner than we planned," Nuesell said Tuesday.

He watched his son be born, then drove 30 miles back to Cary, North Carolina, to take care of their dachshund, Schnitzel. Ice covered most of his windshield and the drive wasn't easy.

"I had probably a good 6-inch-by-6-inch square that I had to peer through to get the best vision," he said. "On multiple occasions, I thought this might not be the best idea."

SURRENDER TO THE SNOW

The tourism office of Ithaca, New York, is waving the white flag, advising visitors on its website to check out the Florida Keys instead.

VisitIthaca.com's home page displays sunny photos from Florida and provides links to Florida Keys information.

The top of the page reads: "That's it. We surrender. Winter, you win. Key West anyone?"

Ithaca and the rest of upstate New York have been in the grips of a snowy and brutally cold winter.

ROOF WORRIES

Two New Hampshire school districts remain closed a day after schools were evacuated over concerns of snow buildup on roofs. A teacher noticed the ceiling sagging in a classroom at Sanborn Middle School in Newton on Monday and cracks were seen around the doorways of some classrooms in Epping. On Tuesday, Moharimet Elementary School in Madbury was evacuated after cracks were seen on the walls, believed to be caused by the heavy snow on the roof.

ICY ROADS

Roads were icy and slushy, making driving difficult in many places and causing at least six traffic fatalities. There were three deaths in Tennessee, including a mother and son in Williamson County who stopped to help a stranded motorist and were struck by a tractor-trailer. Two people were killed in Virginia as nearly a foot of snow fell in some places. In North Carolina, a woman died in a two-car crash in the northeastern part of the state.

BODY SLAM, BUT NOT IN SNOW

In Sterling, Virginia, high-school wrestlers are training for the state tournament, but with practices canceled, they have had to find a workout. Some head to Top of the Podium, a nonprofit youth wrestling facility.

Tom Houck, a former college wrestler who runs the place, opens up on snow days and holds open mat sessions.

"If they're trying to make weight, it's critical that they get their workout in," Houck said.

The first snow day this school year saw only five or six wrestlers. As word spread, nearly 60 wrestlers are showing up.

SPORTS CAR IN THE SNOW?

"I'll just back up and fly out," is the strategy Brent Seney had for freeing his black convertible Mazda Miata from the snow in the nation's capital Tuesday.

Despite the thick blanket of snow along his street, Seney, 60, was confident his sporty ride could handle the roads. In fact, he planned to drive to his boat harbored at James Creek Marina in southwest Washington.

"I'll shovel the snow off, make sure it's not frozen too much because the harbor is all frozen in," Seney said.

TRYING TO FLY

Trudging along a snowy sidewalk, Robin Winter and her daughter, Melissa, made their way to a Metro station in Washington so Mom could catch her flight home to St. Louis.

Robin Winter, carrying multiple bags and sporting a sock monkey hat, said she'd gotten into town Thursday, and had been watching the forecasts as the snow made its way across the country.

"If I would have decided to fly out Sunday night instead, you never know for sure if it's gonna really happen until it really happens," she said.

The Winters were optimistic the flight would not be canceled, though they were prepared for a delay. It appeared her flight left on time, but others weren't so lucky. More than 1,800 flights were canceled at many airports, from Nashville, Tennessee, to the nation's capital.

SNOWBALL FIGHT

Even though the snow in D.C. wasn't ideal for a fight, people showed up anyway, some in costumes and battle gear. One wore a ski helmet and goggles, another had on a giraffe costume, and one wore a Captain America shirt and carried a shield.

"It's not really snowball material. You can kind of get one, but it's a lot of squeezing," said Reco Thomas, of Alexandria, Virginia, as she tried to compact fluffy snow.

Rob Grell, a George Washington University medical student dressed as Batman, carried fellow student Shaunak Mulani on his shoulders as people pelted the two of them.

"This is overall just a fine time," Mulani said as he shook off snow.

FIRST SHOVELER OUT

The sound of 61-year-old Joe Peldunas shoveling his driveway echoed across the otherwise quiet Marywood neighborhood in north Durham, North Carolina, around 8 a.m. Tuesday. No one else on his cul-de-sac was out, and there were few tracks in the layer of snow and ice more than a half inch thick on the road.

"This snow is probably going to stick around for a few days," he said, adding that he wanted to clear his driveway as soon as possible.

Indeed, forecasters warned that temperatures over the next few days wouldn't provide much relief.

TAKING IT IN STRIDE

After two hours of shoveling his steep driveway in the Cabe's Mill subdivision of north Durham, North Carolina, 68-year-old Clay Shepherd was only halfway done. Still, he didn't seem anywhere close to running out of energy. He was considering an afternoon hike along the nearby Eno River.

"It happens to be my 68th birthday. I didn't imagine I'd be doing this," he said, wearing a green sweater, dark jeans and a knit cap.

"The driveway doesn't get much sun, and if you don't get it, it's not going to melt," he said.

___

Somers reporter from Washington. Associated Press writers Amanda Lee Myers in Washington; Jessica Gresko in Arlington, Virginia; Matthew Barakat in McLean, Virginia, Lucas Johnson in Memphis, Tennessee, contributed.

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