Amanda Knox announces engagement

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What's Amanda Knox Up to Now? She's Engaged

Even though Amanda Knox's legal case is continuing in Italy, back home in Seattle, she's moving on with her life.

According to The Seattle Times, Knox is engaged to musician Colin 'Thunderstrike' Sutherland. Sutherland reportedly wrote her while she was in an Italian jail and even moved back to Seattle to be with her.

Sutherland and Knox have been seen together as far back as September 2014 when the two were spotted in Coney Island.

Knox has retained a fairly normal life since moving back to the United States following her release from Italian prison in 2011.

She graduated from the University of Washington last year with a degree in creative writing.

From there, she's retained a job at a bookstore and as a freelance art reporter for The West Seattle Herald.

But her freedom is still in question abroad.

In 2007, while studying abroad for school in Italy, Knox's roommate, Meredith Kercher was stabbed to death. Knox was arrested in 2007 and indicted on murder charges in 2008.

In '09, Knox was convicted of murder, but appealed. She won the appeal and was released from prison to return to the U.S. in 2011.

Then, just two years later, that ruling was reversed and Italy's highest criminal court ordered a retrial.

The retrial found her guilty and she was again convicted of the same murder in 2014.

Now, there's another appeal as well as a legal fight over whether the U.S. should extradite Knox for her to serve her sentence. That case will be heard March 25.

The Seattle Times reports no wedding date has been set for Knox and Sutherland.

Amanda Knox over the years:

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Amanda Knox announces engagement
Amanda Knox prepares to leave the set following a television interview, Friday, Jan. 31, 2014 in New York. To many Americans, especially in her hometown of Seattle, Amanda Knox seems the victim, unfairly hounded by a capricious foreign legal system for the death of a 21-year-old British woman. But in Italy and elsewhere in Europe, others see her as someone who got away with murder, embroiled in a case that continues to make global headlines and reinforces a negative image of Americans behaving badly _ even criminally _ abroad without any punishment. As she remains free in the U.S., these perceptions will not only fuel the debate about who killed Meredith Kercher in 2007 and what role, if any, Knox played in her death, but also about whether U.S. authorities should, if asked, send her to Italy to face prison. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
This April 9, 2013 photo released by ABC shows Amanda Knox, left, speaking during a taped interview with ABC News' Diane Sawyer in New York. In March, Italy's highest criminal court overturned Knox's acquittal in the 2007 murder of a British student and ordered a new trial. The interview aired Tuesday, April 30, coinciding with the release of her memoir, "Waiting to Be Heard." (AP Photo/ABC, Ida Mae Astute)
This image released by NBC shows Amanda Knox during an interview on the "Today" show, Friday, Sept. 20, 2013 in New York. Knox defended her decision not to return to Italy for a new appeals trial over the 2007 killing of her British roommate, even as she acknowledged that "everything is at stake," insisting she is innocent. In March, Italy's supreme court ordered a new trial for Knox and her former Italian boyfriend. An appeals court in 2011 had acquitted both, overturning convictions by a lower court. Italian law cannot compel Knox to return for the new legal proceeding. (AP Photo/NBC, Peter Kramer)
Amanda Knox, right, is comforted by her parents Curt Knox, left, and Edda Mellas as she sits during a news conference shortly after her arrival at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2011, in Seattle. It's been four years since the University of Washington student left for the study abroad program in Perugia and landed in prison. The group Friends of Amanda Knox and others have been awaiting her return since an Italian appeals court on Monday overturned her conviction of sexually assaulting and killing her British roommate, Meredith Kercher. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Amanda Knox is surrounded by family members shortly after her arrival at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2011, in Seattle. It's been four years since the University of Washington student left for the study abroad program in Perugia and landed in prison. The group Friends of Amanda Knox and others have been awaiting her return since an Italian appeals court on Monday overturned her conviction of sexually assaulting and killing her British roommate, Meredith Kercher. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Amanda Knox breaks in tears after hearing the verdict that overturns her conviction and acquits her of murdering her British roommate Meredith Kercher, at the Perugia court, central Italy, Monday, Oct. 3, 2011. Italian appeals court threw out Amanda Knox's murder conviction Monday and ordered the young American freed after nearly four years in prison for the death of her British roommate Knox collapsed in tears after the verdict overturning her 2009 conviction was read out. Her co-defendant, Italian Raffaele Sollecito, also was cleared of killing 21-year-old Meredith Kercher in 2007. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito)
Media representatives wait for the arrival of Amanda Knox and Raffaele Sollecito for an appeal hearing at Perugia's court, central Italy, Monday, Oct. 3, 2011. Knox, an American student, was convicted of sexually assaulting and murdering Meredith Kercher, her British roommate in Perugia, and sentenced to 26 years in prison. Knox's boyfriend at the time of the 2007 murder, Raffaele Sollecito of Italy, was convicted of the same charges and sentenced to 25 years. Both deny wrongdoing and have appealed the December 2009 verdict. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito)
Amanda Knox's father Curt Knox, right, and sister Deanna, top center, wait at the Perugia court, Italy, Monday Oct. 3, 2011. An Italian appeals court has thrown out Amanda Knox's murder conviction and ordered the young American freed after nearly four years in prison for the death of her British roommate. Knox collapsed in tears after the verdict was read out Monday. Her co-defendant, Raffaele Sollecito, also was cleared of killing 21-year-old Meredith Kercher in 2007. (AP Photo/Tiziana Fabi, Pool)
Amanda Knox is escorted into the Perugia court for an appeal hearing, in Perugia central Italy, Friday, Sept. 30, 2011. Knox, an American student was convicted of sexually assaulting and murdering Meredith Kercher, her British roommate in Perugia, and sentenced to 26 years in prison. Knox's boyfriend at the time of the 2007 murder, Raffaele Sollecito of Italy, was convicted of the same charges and sentenced to 25 years. Both deny wrongdoing and have appealed the December 2009 verdict. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito)
Amanda Knox looks on during a hearing at the Perugia court, Italy, central Italy, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. Knox, an American student was convicted of sexually assaulting and murdering Meredith Kercher, her British roommate in Perugia, and sentenced to 26 years in prison. Knox's boyfriend at the time of the 2007 murder, Raffaele Sollecito of Italy, was convicted of the same charges and sentenced to 25 years. Both deny wrongdoing and have appealed the December 2009 verdict. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito)
Raffaele Sollecito, right, is asked to take a seat after arriving at the Perugia court, central Italy, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011. Sollecito and Amanda Knox, an American student were convicted of sexually assaulting and murdering Meredith Kercher, a British student in Perugia, and sentenced to 26 years in prison. They deny wrongdoing and have appealed their convictions, which were issued by a lower court in 2009. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito)
Amanda Knox attends an hearing of her appeals trial at the Perugia court, Italy, Saturday, Sept. 24, 2011. Italian prosecutors have urged an appeals court to uphold the murder conviction of Amanda Knox despite what they called a media campaign in support of the American student, asking the jurors to think instead of the young victim whose life was brutally ended. In the first round of closing arguments that took seven hours Friday, the prosecutors summed up circumstantial evidence, testimony and other clues they believe point solely to Knox and Raffaele Sollecito. (AP Photo/Stefano Medici)
Amanda Knox arrives at the Perugia court, Italy, Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011, to attend an hearing of her appeals case. The appeals court has rejected a prosecutors' request for new DNA testing saying it would be unneccessary after lengthy discussion over genetic evidence. The decision Wednesday by Judge Claudio Pratillo Hellmann opens the way for closing arguments, which are set to begin on Sept. 23 with the prosecution. A verdict is expected by month's end. Independent experts have recently cast doubt on DNA evidence that is crucial to the case. Knox and her co-defendant and one-time boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, were convicted of sexually assaulting and killing Meredith Kercher in the apartment that Knox and the 21-year-old Briton shared while studying in Perugia. Knox was sentenced to 26 years in prison; Sollecito to 25. Both deny wrongdoing and have appealed the December 2009 verdict. (AP Photo/Stefano Medici)
American student Amanda Knox talks with her lawyer Luciano Ghirga during a hearing of the trial where she is accused of murdering her flatmate, British student Meredith Kercher, in Perugia, Italy, Monday, July 25, 2011. Independent experts presented the conclusions of their review of the DNA evidence collected against Amanda Knox and her co-defendant Raffaele Sollecito. DNA evidence played a crucial role in securing the convictions of Amanda and Raffaele Sollecito in the 2007 murder of Meredith Kercher, who was stabbed to death in the apartment she shared with the Seattle exchange student. (AP Photo/Stefano Medici)
Convicted US student Amanda Knox arrives for a hearing in her appeals trial, at Perugia's courthouse, Italy, Saturday, Dec. 18, 2010. Last year, Knox was convicted and sentenced to 26 years in prison for the murder of her British roommate Meredith Kercher. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
U.S. murder suspect Amanda Knox, right, arrives for a hearing in her appeals trial in the murder of her British roommate Meredith Kercher, in Perugia's courthouse, Italy, Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2010. Knox is back in court as her appeals trials opens in Italy, about a year after the American student was convicted of killing her British roommate. Wearing a blue sweater, Knox was escorted by a policewoman Wednesday into the same Perugia courtroom where the first trial was held. The 23-year-old was convicted in December of sexually assaulting and murdering Kercher, and sentenced to 26 years in prison. (AP Photo/Stefano Medici)
Raffaele Sollecito walks outside Florence court, Italy, Monday, Jan. 20, 2014. A prosecutor urged a court on Monday to take steps to make sure that American Amanda Knox and her former Italian boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito would serve their sentences, if they are convicted of murdering British student Meredith Kercher. Prosecutor Alessandro Crini preceded his request by noting that Knox has remained in the United States for this trial, while co-defendant Raffaele Sollecito has traveled abroad during it. In the case of Sollecito, who told reporters Monday that he intends to remain in Italy for the verdict, the precautionary measures could include immediate arrest, house arrest or the confiscation of his passport. (AP Photo/Francesco Bellini)
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