Remains of sunken town re-emerge in Brazil's drought

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Remains of sunken town re-emerge in Brazil's drought
These are bricks from buildings unseen for more than 45 years. They were once part of a town that was submerged when the government built a dam nearby. But now, as the Brazil grapples with its worst drought in 80 years, the town of Igarata is re-emerging. And former residents like Jose Carlos Almeida, say they're conflicted by the sight of their old home.
Aerial view of the Jaguari dam at Igarata, some 79 km from Sao Paulo, Brazil, on April 4, 2013. AFP PHOTO / Nelson ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
Aerial view of the Jaguari dam at Igarata, some 79 km from Sao Paulo, Brazil, on April 4, 2013. AFP PHOTO / Nelson ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
Aerial view of the Jaguari dam at Igarata, some 79 km from Sao Paulo,, Brazil, on April 4, 2013. AFP PHOTO / Nelson ALMEIDA (Photo credit should read NELSON ALMEIDA/AFP/Getty Images)
29º Passeio VFC - Igaratá
29º Passeio VFC - Igaratá
Aerial view of the river system shaped by Jaguari Dam in Igarata, about 80km east of Sao Paulo, Brazil, on October 17, 2012. AFP PHOTO/Yasuyoshi CHIBA (Photo credit should read YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)
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These are bricks from buildings unseen for more than 45 years. They were once part of a town that was submerged when the government built a dam nearby.

Now, as Brazil grapples with its worst drought in 80 years, the town of Igarata is re-emerging.

"The Jaguari River in São Paulo is 30 metres below its normal level, revealing the old structures of the former town of Igarata, including the church, its main street, a square, parts of old benches and a cross," Reuters reports.

Former residents like Jose Carlos Almeida say they're conflicted by the sight of their old home.

"It brings me happiness in some ways, but it's also very sad. Happiness because the things that were around when I was a child are re-emerging form the water, but sadness because of the lack of water."

Another former resident, Irene De Almeida, 65, says she still recognizes the lay of the land, though it has been ravaged. "We were born, we suffered we grew up here," she said as she took a seat on a bench that hasn't been seen in decades.

Beyond the ruins in São Paulo, authorities have already lowered water pressure for up to 18 hours a day, trying to compensate for a drought that is exposing the country's past, brick by brick.

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