Rare blue-eyed lemurs could be extinct in 11 years

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Rare Blue-Eyed Lemur Could Go Extinct In 11 Years

Get a good look at these baby blues, because a new study reports that the type of lemur that has these stunning eyes could be extinct in a little more than a decade.

The International Union for Conservation and Nature says the creatures, called blue-eyed black lemurs, are on the "critically endangered list." There are only about 1,000 left in the wild.

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Rare blue-eyed lemurs could be extinct in 11 years
'Dimbi', a blue-eyed black lemur cub (Eulemur flavifrons) is pictured at the zoo of Mulhouse, northeastern France, on April 19, 2013. There's currently less than 2,000 blue-eyed black lemurs into the wild. AFP PHOTO / SEBASTIEN BOZON (Photo credit should read SEBASTIEN BOZON/AFP/Getty Images)
'Dimbi', a blue-eyed black lemur cub (Eulemur flavifrons) is pictured at the zoo of Mulhouse, northeastern France, on April 19, 2013. There's currently less than 2,000 blue-eyed black lemurs into the wild. AFP PHOTO / SEBASTIEN BOZON (Photo credit should read SEBASTIEN BOZON/AFP/Getty Images)
A veterinarian of the Mulhouse zoo bottle-feeds 'Dimbi', a blue-eyed black lemur cub (Eulemur flavifrons) on April 19, 2013, in Mulhouse. There's currently less than 2000 blue-eyed black lemurs in nature. AFP PHOTO / SEBASTIEN BOZON (Photo credit should read SEBASTIEN BOZON/AFP/Getty Images)
'Dimbi', a blue-eyed black lemur cub (Eulemur flavifrons) is pictured at the zoo of Mulhouse, northeastern France, on April 19, 2013. There's currently less than 2,000 blue-eyed black lemurs into the wild. AFP PHOTO / SEBASTIEN BOZON (Photo credit should read SEBASTIEN BOZON/AFP/Getty Images)
Female Blue Eyed Lemur
'Dimbi', a blue-eyed black lemur cub (Eulemur flavifrons) is pictured at the zoo of Mulhouse, northeastern France, on April 19, 2013. There's currently less than 2,000 blue-eyed black lemurs into the wild. AFP PHOTO / SEBASTIEN BOZON (Photo credit should read SEBASTIEN BOZON/AFP/Getty Images)
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The study, published in the African Journal of Ecology, says the rare primate could be extinct within "11 years."

The study says these Madagascar lemurs are in trouble because of increased farming and logging in their natural habitat.

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