Dead prosecutor was drafting arrest warrant for Argentine president

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Dead prosecutor was drafting arrest warrant for Argentine president
Investigators found a draft of an arrest warrant for Argentina's president in the apartment of the deceased prosecutor who accused her of a cover-up.
Argentina's Public Prosecutor Alberto Nisman gives a news conference in Buenos Aires on May 20, 2009. The Public Prosecutor's office on Wednesday released the portrait of Colombian national Samuel Salman El Reda, accused of being one of the leaders of local connection that carried out the terrorist attack against Jewish-Argentine organization AMIA on July 18, 1994, killing 85 people and wounding another 300. AFP PHOTO/JUAN MABROMATA (Photo credit should read JUAN MABROMATA/AFP/Getty Images)
Argentine Foreign Minister Hector Timerman gives a press conference at the presidential palace Casa Rosada, in Buenos Aires, on January 15, 2015 a day after prosecutor Alberto Nisman accused Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, Timerman himself and other government officials for an alleged plan to cover Iran of its responsibilities in the bombing of the AMIA Jewish centre in 1994. Nisman asked Fernandez de Kirchner, Timerman and others, be investigated for the cover up of the attack on the Argentine Jewish Charities Federation (AMIA) that left 85 people dead and 300 others injured. AFP PHOTO / ALEJANDRO PAGNI (Photo credit should read ALEJANDRO PAGNI/AFP/Getty Images)
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez, sitting in a wheelchair, leads a signing ceremony at the Casa Rosada government palace in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Friday, Jan. 30, 2015. Fernandez said Friday that she will voice all the opinions she wants to about the case of prosecutor Alberto Nisman, who was found dead on Jan. 18, hours before he was to elaborate on his accusation that Fernandez protected those responsible for a 1994 terror bombing. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
Argentine deputy for the ruling party Andres Larroque, one of the people involved in the case late prosecutor Alberto Nisman was due to present before the congress the day after the day he died, gives the thumbs up during a ceremony of President Cristina Kirchner with provincial governors, in Buenos Aires, on January 30, 2015. President Cristina Kirchner on Monday said that she will disband Argentina's intelligence service after a prosecutor was found dead just hours before he was to make explosive allegations against her. AFP PHOTO / ALEJANDRO PAGNI (Photo credit should read ALEJANDRO PAGNI/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken in March 2008 shows Iran's defense minister-designate Ahmad Vahidi in Tehran. Vahidi is being sought by Interpol in connection with the worst terrorist attack on Argentine soil, the 1994 bombing of a Jewish charities headquarters building, Argentinian prosecutor Alberto Nisman said on August 21, 2009. AFP PHOTO/FARS NEWS (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman holds a placard that reads 'I Am Nisman' during a rally in front of the headquarters of the AMIA (Argentine Israelite Mutual Association), in Buenos Aires on January 21, 2015, to protest against the death of Argentine public prosecutor Alberto Nisman, who was found shot dead earlier, just days after accusing President Cristina Kirchner of obstructing a probe into a 1994 Jewish center bombing that killed 85 peiople and injured another 300. Nisman, 51, who was just hours away from testifying at a congressional hearing, was found dead overnight in his apartment in the trendy Puerto Madero neighbourhood of the capital. 'I can confirm that a 22-caliber handgun was found beside the body,' prosecutor Viviana Fein said. The nation's top security official said Nisman appears to have committed suicide. AFP PHOTO / Alejandro PAGNI (Photo credit should read ALEJANDRO PAGNI/AFP/Getty Images)
Diego Lagomarsino, information specialist who gave late prosecutor Alberto Nisman the gun that killed him, speaks to reporters during a press conference in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015. Lagomarsino said that Nisman feared for the safety of his adult daughters and didn't trust the policemen protecting him. Lagomarsino, a long-time acquaintance of Nisman, said the prosecutor asked him if he had a gun, telling him he wanted the gun to protect his daughters. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
Viviana Fein, who leads the investigation of prosecutor Alberto Nisman's death, speaks with reporters outside her office, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Thursday, Jan. 22, 2015. The death of the prosecutor who had accused Argentinaís President Cristina Fernandez of a criminal conspiracy came under mounting questions Wednesday with the discovery that the apartment where he was found dead had not been securely locked and had a third entrance. Fernandez who initially believed the prosecutor had taken his own life, said Thursday that she is now ìconvincedî Nisman did not commit suicide. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
A demonstrator holds a sign that reads in Spanish "I am Nisman" during a protest sparked by the death of special prosecutor Alberto Nisman, outside the government house in Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Monday, Jan. 19, 2015. The other signs read "Enough Cristina," left, and "Thank you Nisman." Nisman, who had been investigating the 1994 bombing of the AMIA Jewish community center in Buenos Aires that killed 85 people and who accused President Cristina Fernandez of shielding Iranian suspects, was found dead with a gunshot to his head in the bathroom of his apartment late Sunday, hours before he was to testify in a Congressional hearing about the case. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. 19th Jan, 2015. Demonstrators gather at the Plaza de Mayo after the death of Prosecutor Alberto Nisman, who committed suicide a week after accusing President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner of making a deal with Iran to call off any legal actions against Iranian diplomats allegedly involved in the AMIA building bombing in 1994. The demonstration ended with incidents between the Police and a reduced group of demonstrators that tried to trespass a protective fence. © Patricio Murphy/ZUMA Wire/Alamy Live News


The prosecutor murdered last month in Argentina was reportedly planning to have the country's president arrested.

Alberto Nisman was found dead January 18 in his home, a draft of an arrest warrant for President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner was then found in his trash, according to the New York Times.

The 26-page document wanted Kirchner and an accomplice, Foreign Minister Héctor Timerman, brought into custody for shielding Iranian officials from responsibility in the 1994 bombing of a Buenos Aires Jewish Center, sources told the paper.

Nisman was apparently found murdered from a single gunshot wound to the head, according to earlier reports. His slaying came only one day before was set to present his findings on Kirchner and Timerman to Argentina's Congress.

Both Kirchner and Timerman have repeatedly denied any wrongdoing, but the prosecutor's death raised more than a few questions. The revelation he had drafted an arrest warrant for the duo will only further raise the world's collective eyebrows.

A political analyst who spoke to the Times claimed the testimony "would have provoked a crisis without precedents in Argentina ... a scandal on a level previously unseen."
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