Indian village doesn't have a single door

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There Are No Doors In This Indian Village


A village in India has no doors due to residents' beliefs that a local deity protects them and their unsecured valuables from harm.

The inhabitants of Shani Shingnapur remain door-free because centuries ago, the God of Saturn Shani told the village head in a dream that he would keep harm away so doors never need to be installed.

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Shani Shingnapur: A village with no doors
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Indian village doesn't have a single door
To go with 'India-Religion-Society-Crime' FEATURE by Rachel O'Brien In this photograph taken on November 24, 2014, Indian children play outside the entrance to their home which has no doors, in the village of Shani Shignapur in Ahmednagar District some 200kms east of Mumbai in the western state of Maharashtra. In Shani Shingnapur village in western India, residents see little need for such security, thanks to their belief in special protection from the Hindu deity Shani. AFP PHOTO/ PUNIT PARANJPE (Photo credit should read PUNIT PARANJPE/AFP/Getty Images)
To go with 'India-Religion-Society-Crime' FEATURE by Rachel O'Brien In this photograph taken on November 24, 2014, an Indian resident looks on from the entrance to her home which has no doors, in the village of Shani Shignapur in Ahmednagar District some 200kms east of Mumbai in the western state of Maharashtra. In Shani Shingnapur village in western India, residents see little need for such security, thanks to their belief in special protection from the Hindu deity Shani. AFP PHOTO/ PUNIT PARANJPE (Photo credit should read PUNIT PARANJPE/AFP/Getty Images)
To go with 'India-Religion-Society-Crime' FEATURE by Rachel O'Brien In this photograph taken on November 24, 2014, an Indian family gather at their home which has no doors, in the village of Shani Shignapur in Ahmednagar District some 200kms east of Mumbai in the western state of Maharashtra. In Shani Shingnapur village in western India, residents see little need for such security, thanks to their belief in special protection from the Hindu deity Shani. AFP PHOTO/ PUNIT PARANJPE (Photo credit should read PUNIT PARANJPE/AFP/Getty Images)
devotees offering oil at Shani Shinganapur temple ; Ahmednagar ; Maharashtra ; India
Decorated entrance of Shri Shaneshwar temple ; Shani Shinganapur ; Maharashtra ; India
To go with 'India-Religion-Society-Crime' FEATURE by Rachel O'Brien In this photograph taken on November 24, 2014, an Indian customer steps out of a bank which has no locks on the doors, in the village of Shani Shignapur in Ahmednagar District some 200kms east of Mumbai in the western state of Maharashtra. In Shani Shingnapur village in western India, residents see little need for such security, thanks to their belief in special protection from the Hindu deity Shani. AFP PHOTO/ PUNIT PARANJPE (Photo credit should read PUNIT PARANJPE/AFP/Getty Images)
To go with 'India-Religion-Society-Crime' FEATURE by Rachel O'Brien In this photograph taken on November 24, 2014, Indian farmers stand with bullock carts laden with sugarcane outside a sugar factory in the village of Shani Shignapur in Ahmednagar District some 200kms east of Mumbai in the western state of Maharashtra. In Shani Shingnapur village in western India, residents see little need for such security, thanks to their belief in special protection from the Hindu deity Shani. AFP PHOTO/ PUNIT PARANJPE (Photo credit should read PUNIT PARANJPE/AFP/Getty Images)
To go with 'India-Religion-Society-Crime' FEATURE by Rachel O'Brien In this photograph taken on November 24, 2014, an Indian family gather at their home which has no doors, in the village of Shani Shignapur in Ahmednagar District some 200kms east of Mumbai in the western state of Maharashtra. In Shani Shingnapur village in western India, residents see little need for such security, thanks to their belief in special protection from the Hindu deity Shani. AFP PHOTO/ PUNIT PARANJPE (Photo credit should read PUNIT PARANJPE/AFP/Getty Images)
To go with 'India-Religion-Society-Crime' FEATURE by Rachel O'Brien In this photograph taken on November 24, 2014, an Indian family gather at their home which has no doors, in the village of Shani Shignapur in Ahmednagar District some 200kms east of Mumbai in the western state of Maharashtra. In Shani Shingnapur village in western India, residents see little need for such security, thanks to their belief in special protection from the Hindu deity Shani. AFP PHOTO/ PUNIT PARANJPE (Photo credit should read PUNIT PARANJPE/AFP/Getty Images)
To go with 'India-Religion-Society-Crime' FEATURE by Rachel O'Brien In this photograph taken on November 24, 2014, an Indian family gather outside their house which has no doors, in the village of Shani Shignapur in Ahmednagar District some 200kms east of Mumbai in the western state of Maharashtra. In Shani Shingnapur village in western India, residents see little need for such security, thanks to their belief in special protection from the Hindu deity Shani. AFP PHOTO/ PUNIT PARANJPE (Photo credit should read PUNIT PARANJPE/AFP/Getty Images)
To go with 'India-Religion-Society-Crime' FEATURE by Rachel O'Brien In this photograph taken on November 24, 2014, an Indian family gather at their home which has no doors, in the village of Shani Shignapur in Ahmednagar District some 200kms east of Mumbai in the western state of Maharashtra. In Shani Shingnapur village in western India, residents see little need for such security, thanks to their belief in special protection from the Hindu deity Shani. AFP PHOTO/ PUNIT PARANJPE (Photo credit should read PUNIT PARANJPE/AFP/Getty Images)
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As a result, the town prides itself on being a model village where houses are kept open and valuables are left unsecured. It is predicted that anyone who commits a crime would be doomed to Sade Saati, or seven-and-a-half years of bad luck.

To address practical matters while upholding the belief, public restrooms are protected by a thin sheet, and panels are sometimes propped against house entrances at night to keep animals out.

Unfortunately, the village's pristine reputation has taken a hit in the past few years because multiple thefts of unsecured valuables have been reported.

As a result, some residents are planning to install doors for security purposes, though it is a highly controversial move.

The town of about 5,000 used to rely on sugar cane farming for income, but now it collects tourism dollars from more than 40,000 daily visitors.

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