Top official: Russians will 'eat less' for Putin

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Top official: Russians will 'eat less' for Putin
Deputy Minister Igor Shuvalov says Russians will sacrifice food and energy before abandoning President Vladimir Putin, despite international pressure.
First Deputy Prime Minister of Russia Igor Shuvalov speaks during a panel "The Russian Outlook"at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Friday, Jan. 23, 2015. The world's financial and political elite will head this week to the Swiss Alps for 2015's gathering of the World Economic Forum at the Swiss ski resort of Davos. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)
Igor Shuvalov, Russia's first deputy prime minister, pauses during a session on day three of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland, on Friday, Jan. 23, 2015. World leaders, influential executives, bankers and policy makers attend the 45th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos from Jan. 21-24. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Russian First Deputy Prime Minister Igor Shuvalov (L) speaks to Andrey Kostin, Chairman and CEO of the Russian Bank VTB, during a session of the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting on January 23, 2015 in Davos. AFP PHOTO / FABRICE COFFRINI (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)
Russian First Deputy Prime Minister Igor Shuvalov gestures during a session of the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting on January 23, 2015 in Davos. AFP PHOTO / FABRICE COFFRINI (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)
Russian President Vladimir Putin, right meets with the Cabinet in the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. From left, Deputy Prime Minister Olga Golodets, First Deputy Prime Minister Igor Shuvalov, Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev. (AP Photo/RIA-Novosti, Yekaterina Shtukina, Government Press Service)
Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro in the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin, Pool)
A World Economic Forum logo sits on the floor of the Kongress Zentrum, or Congress Center, on day three of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland, on Friday, Jan. 23, 2015. World leaders, influential executives, bankers and policy makers attend the 45th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos from Jan. 21-24. Photographer: Jason Alden/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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DAVOS, Switzerland (AP) -- Russian Deputy Prime Minister Igor Shuvalov, speaking at the World Economic Forum in Davos, on Friday warned the West against trying to topple President Vladimir Putin and said that Russians are ready to sacrifice their wealth in Putin's support.

Russia has for the past year been sliding into recession amid a slump in its energy export prices as well as Western sanctions against Moscow's role in the conflict in Ukraine that has claimed more than 5,000 lives. Questions have been raised in Russia and abroad whether the price that ordinary Russians are having to pay for the annexation of Crimea is too high.

Shuvalov, who is believed to be one of the richest men in the government, said that what he considers the West's attempts to oust Putin will only unite the nation further.

"When a Russian feels any foreign pressure, he will never give up his leader," Shuvalov said. "Never. We will survive any hardship in the country - eat less food, use less electricity."

Shuvalov's comments triggered pithy remarks on Russia social media including an opposition activist who posted photos of Shuvalov's Moscow, London and Austria homes to illustrate where the deputy prime minister would experience the hardships he described.

At the same panel in Davos, Putin's long-time ally and former finance minister Alexei Kudrin said that Putin clearly thinks that Russia's foreign policy interests at this point are worth the price the nation pays in higher inflation and the collapse of the Russian ruble.

Shuvalov, who worked with Kudrin until he resigned from the government in 2011, defended Russia's foreign policy but warned that Russia is "going into a longer crisis" compared with 2008, when it was battered for about two years by the global crisis.

Shuvalov said Russia should focus on cushioning the economic fall through reforms and supporting the financial system. "It is going to get worse and the anti-crisis plan should be aimed at adapting to the hard landing," he said.

Russia's foreign currency reserves shrank by 2 percent last week alone to $379 billion as the Central Bank sold foreign currency in a bid to prop up the ruble.

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