Military unit trains for aeromedical evacuations

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Military unit trains for aeromedical evacuations
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Military unit trains for aeromedical evacuations
A member of the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron walks to board a C-17 cargo plane for a training flight out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units support nearly nine out of 10 aeromedical evacuation missions. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Members of the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron signal as a truck backs up to unload supplies for a training fight on a C-17 cargo plane out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. Most medical evacuations of wounded military members are performed by Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
This aerial photo taken out the window of a C-17 Cargo plane, shows water while flying near Red Bluff, Calif., during a training flight for the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron, Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units support nearly nine out of 10 aeromedical evacuation missions. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Senior master Sgt. Selina Novasio, an aeromedical technician with the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron, studies paperwork as she sits next to a mannequin representing a medical patient during a training fight on a C-17 cargo plane out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units support nearly nine out of 10 aeromedical evacuation missions. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Members of the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron, Maj. Beverly Davidson, left, and Chief Master Sgt. Saudi McVea, go over notes during a training fight on a C-17 cargo plane out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Master Sgt. Natalia Stockhausen, top, a flight medic with the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron, gives instructions as she works on a mannequin representing a medical patient during a training fight on a C-17 cargo plane out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. Most medical evacuations of wounded military members are performed by Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Members of the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron work during a training fight on a C-17 cargo plane out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units support nearly nine out of 10 aeromedical evacuation missions. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Chief Master Sgt. Saudi McVea holds up a sign announcing a training situation of rapid decompression of an aircraft carrying medical patients as she serves as mission clinical coordinator on a training flight of the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron on a C-17 cargo plane out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. Squadron members did not know which scenario they would be facing during the flight and they had to respond according to the needs of their simulated patients. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Members of the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron carry a mannequin representing a medical patient during a training fight on a C-17 cargo plane out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. Most medical evacuations of wounded military members are performed by Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
A bag of an IV solution marked training is shown during a training fight for the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron on a C-17 cargo plane out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. Most medical evacuations of wounded military members are performed by Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Air Force Reserve Capt. Weston Sewall flies a C-17 Cargo plane near the California-Nevada border during a training flight for the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. Most medical evacuations of wounded military members are performed by Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Chief Master Sgt. Saudi McVea holds up a sign announcing a training situation of rapid decompression of an aircraft carrying medical patients as she serves as mission clinical coordinator on a training flight of the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron on a C-17 cargo plane out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. Squadron members did not know which scenario they would be facing during the flight and they had to respond according to the needs of their simulated patients. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Maj. Shana Weber, a flight nurse with the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron, listens to instructions as she stands next to a mannequin representing a medical patient during a training fight on a C-17 cargo plane out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. Most medical evacuations of wounded military members are performed by Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Chief Master Sgt. Saudi McVea wears the patch of the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron on her arm during a crew briefing prior to a training flight on a C-17 cargo plane out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
A C-17 cargo plane similar to one used for a training flight for members of the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron taxis in front of Mount Rainier at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. Most medical evacuations of wounded military members are performed by Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Senior master Sgt. Selina Novasio, left, an aeromedical technician with the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron, studies paperwork as she sits next to a mannequin representing a medical patient during a training fight on a C-17 cargo plane out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. Most medical evacuations of wounded military members are performed by Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Members of the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron practice how to equalize pressure in the sinuses of a medical patient, played by Maj. Beverly Davidson, second from left, in the event of sudden decompression of an aircraft, during a training fight on a C-17 cargo plane out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. Most medical evacuations of wounded military members are performed by Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Air Force Reserve Senior Airman Elijah Burns, a medical technician with the Air Force Reserve 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron, stands with two mannequins representing medical patients during a training fight on a C-17 cargo plane out of Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. Most medical evacuations of wounded military members are performed by Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
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JOINT BASE LEWIS-MCCHORD, Wash. (AP) -- Whenever and wherever wounded members of the military need a medical evacuation, they could find themselves flying with a C-17 crew from Joint Base Lewis-McChord near Seattle.

Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard units support nearly nine out of 10 aeromedical evacuation missions. One of those units is the 446th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron at Lewis-McChord. Its members took some reporters and photographers along on a training flight Wednesday.

Lewis-McChord has the Air Force's second-largest fleet of C-17 cargo planes. About 2,900 airmen are assigned to the active duty wing, and another 2,300 reservists are based at McChord Air Field.

The U.S. defense budget calls for a reduction of eight planes, but Lewis-McChord will still have about one-fifth of the Air Force fleet of 213 C-17 jets.

Here are some photographs from the training flight.

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