France: Terror funding, attack weapons came from abroad

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France: Terror funding, attack weapons came from abroad
A police officer talks to a Jewish person outside the kosher grocery where Amedy Coulibaly killed four people earlier in a terror attack, in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015. New York mayor Bill de Blasio is expected to pay respect to the victims at the killing sites later today. Brothers, Said and Cherif Kouachi, and their friend, Amedy Coulibaly, killed 17 people at the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher grocery and elsewhere last week. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Armed British police officers stand on guard near the French Institute and French School in the South Kensington area of London, on the same day the new edition of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo went on sale in France, with copies expected to arrive at vendors to be sold in London on Friday, Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015. Charlie Hebdo's defiant new issue sold out before dawn around Paris on Wednesday, with scuffles at kiosks over dwindling copies of the paper fronting the Prophet Muhammad. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
French police officers guard the kosher grocery where Amedy Coulibaly killed four people in a terror attack, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015. France announced sweeping new measures to counter homegrown terrorism Wednesday, including giving security forces better weapons and protection, going on an intelligence agent hiring spree and creating a better database of anyone suspected of extremist links. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
Police officers guard French citizen Fritz-Joly Joachin, 29, center, inside the courtroom before a hearing in the town of Haskovo, Bulgaria, Friday, Jan. 16, 2015. A Bulgarian court considers on Friday a request to extradite a French citizen charged with having been linked to the Kouachi brothers who killed 12 people at the Paris headquarters of Charlie Hebdo magazine last week. (AP Photo)
Police stand guard outside the town hall in the center of Antwerp, Belgium, on Friday, Jan. 16, 2015. Thirteen people were detained in Belgium and two arrested in France in an anti-terror sweep following a firefight in Verviers, Belgium, in which two suspected terrorists were killed, and more suspects are being sought, Belgian authorities said. Security has been enhanced around public buildings and Jewish schools were closed for the day on Friday. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
Charlie Hebdo newspaper is displayed next a newsstand with a poster reading " I am Charlie" in Nice southeastern France, Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015. On front page, reading "All is forgiven". Charlie Hebdo's defiant issue is in print, with a caricature of the Prophet Muhammad on the cover and a double-page spread claiming that more turned out Sunday to back the satirical weekly "than for Mass." Twelve people died when two masked gunmen assaulted the newspaper's offices on Jan. 7, including much of the editorial staff and two police. (AP Photo/ Lionel Cironneau)
GENEVA, SWITZERLAND - JANUARY 10: Candles and banners reading 'I'm Charlie' in french are placed for the victims of the Paris 'Charlie Hebdo' attack on January 10, 2015 in front of consulate general of France in Geneva, Switzerland. (Photo by Betul Yuruk/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
People place candles on January 10, 2015 during a demonstration at the end of Shabbat called by the Jewish Student's Union of France (UEJF) at the Porte de Vincennes in eastern Paris in homage to the four victims of the January 9 nearby hostage-taking drama at a kosher supermarket that ended with a police assault and the killing of the hostage-taker. Hundreds of thousands of people staged rallies across France on January 10 following three days of terror and twin siege dramas that claimed 17 victims, including 12 at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Police stand by as a hearse carrying the coffin of Mustapha Ourrad, the proofreader of French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo, arrives at Pere Lachaise cemetery in Paris on January 16, 2015. Twelve people, including Ourrad, cartoonists Charb, Wolinski, Cabu and Tignous and deputy chief editor Bernard Maris, were killed on January 7 when gunmen armed with Kalashnikovs and a rocket-launcher opened fire in the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo . AFP PHOTO / JACQUES DEMARTHON (Photo credit should read JACQUES DEMARTHON/AFP/Getty Images)
French cartoonist Renald Luzier, aka Luz (C), arrives at Pere Lachaise cemetery in Paris on January 16, 2015 for the funeral ceremony of Mustapha Ourrad, the proofreader of French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo. Twelve people, including Ourrad, cartoonists Charb, Wolinski, Cabu and Tignous and deputy chief editor Bernard Maris, were killed on January 7 when gunmen armed with Kalashnikovs and a rocket-launcher opened fire in the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo . AFP PHOTO / JACQUES DEMARTHON (Photo credit should read JACQUES DEMARTHON/AFP/Getty Images)
French cartoonist Willem (3rd L) leaves the Pere Lachaise cemetery, before the funeral ceremony of Charlie Hebdo's French cartoonist Honore and proofreader Mustapha Ourrad, on January 16, 2015 in Paris. Twelve people were killed, including cartoonists Charb, Wolinski, Cabu and Tignous and deputy chief editor Bernard Maris when gunmen armed with Kalashnikovs and a rocket-launcher opened fire in the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo on January 7. AFP PHOTO / JACQUES DEMARTHON (Photo credit should read JACQUES DEMARTHON/AFP/Getty Images)
Policemen search at the entrance of the Pere Lachaise cemetery, before the funeral ceremony of Charlie Hebdo's French cartoonist Honore and proofreader Mustapha Ourrad, on January 16, 2015 in Paris. Twelve people were killed, including cartoonists Charb, Wolinski, Cabu and Tignous and deputy chief editor Bernard Maris when gunmen armed with Kalashnikovs and a rocket-launcher opened fire in the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo on January 7. AFP PHOTO / JACQUES DEMARTHON (Photo credit should read JACQUES DEMARTHON/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 15: Mourners attend the funeral service of Charlie Hebdo cartoonist Georges Wolinski at the Montparnasse Cemetary on January 15, 2015 in Paris, France. Cartoonist Georges Wolinski was killed in last week's terrorist attack on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Mehmet Kaman/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
FILE - In this April 23, 2013 file photo, a suspected Yemeni al-Qaida militant, center, holds an Islamist banner as he stands behind bars during a court hearing in state security court in Sanaa, Yemen. A top leader of Yemen's al-Qaida branch has claimed responsibility for last week's attack on a Paris newspaper when two masked gunmen killed 12 people, including much of the weekly's editorial staff and two police officers. Nasr al-Ansi, a top commander of Al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, or AQAP as the branch is known, appeared in an 11-minute Internet video posted Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2015. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed, File)
Yemeni security member stand guard outside a court during the postponement of a sentencing hearing for suspected Al-Qaeda militants in the Yemeni capital Sanaa on January 13 , 2015. The court specialising in terrorism cases sentenced seven defendants to between two and four years of imprisonment on charges of being affiliated with Al-Qaeda, acquitting an eighth. AFP PHOTO / MOHAMMED HUWAIS (Photo credit should read MOHAMMED HUWAIS/AFP/Getty Images)
French Prime minister Manuel Valls delivers a speech during a special session of the national assembly to pay tribute to the 17 victims killed in Islamist attacks last week at the French National Assembly in Paris on January 13, 2015. Prime Minister Manuel Valls told members of parliament that France was at 'war with terrorism, jihadism and radicalism', in the wake of the country's bloodiest attacks in half a century. AFP PHOTO / FRANCOIS GUILLOT (Photo credit should read FRANCOIS GUILLOT/AFP/Getty Images)
From left, French Prime Minister Manuel Valls, French Senate President Gerard Larcher, Foreign Affairs Minister Laurent Fabius, and Defense Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian attend a ceremony to pay tribute to the three police officers killed in the attacks, in Paris, France, Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015. Police officers Ahmed Merabet, 40, Franck Brinsolaro, 49, were killed during the attacks at Charlie Hebdo, and Clarissa Jean-Philippe killed in Montrouge last week. (AP Photo/Francois Mori, pool)
French Prime minister Manuel Valls (C) embraces French Interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve during a special session of the national assembly to pay tribute to the 17 victims killed in Islamist attacks last week at the French National Assembly in Paris on January 13, 2015. Prime Minister Manuel Valls told members of parliament that France was at 'war with terrorism, jihadism and radicalism', in the wake of the country's bloodiest attacks in half a century. AFP PHOTO / FRANCOIS GUILLOT (Photo credit should read FRANCOIS GUILLOT/AFP/Getty Images)
French Prime minister Manuel Valls embraces French Interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve during a special session of the national assembly to pay tribute to the 17 victims killed in Islamist attacks last week at the French National Assembly in Paris on January 13, 2015. Prime Minister Manuel Valls told members of parliament that France was at 'war with terrorism, jihadism and radicalism', in the wake of the country's bloodiest attacks in half a century. AFP PHOTO / FRANCOIS GUILLOT (Photo credit should read FRANCOIS GUILLOT/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 10: People light the candles to commemorate the victims of Charlie Hebdo and kosher supermarket in front of HyperCacher supermarket at Porte de Vincennes, in Paris, France, on January 10, 2015. (Photo by Geoffroy Van der Hasselt/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 10: A fresco reading 'Je suis Charlie' painted by artists Andre, Lek & Sowat, Cokney, Alxone, Legz, Arnaud Liard, MBS, Hoctez, Hugo Vitrani, Jean Charles de Castelbajac and Felipe Oliveira Baptista is seen at the Palais de Tokyo on January 10, 2015 in Paris, France. Four hostages and three suspects were killed when police ended two separate sieges at a kosher supermarket and a printing company on an industrial estate, following Wednesday's deadly attack on Charlie Hebdo magazine. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Richard Bord/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 10: A woman holds up a placard reading 'Je suis Yohan et je suis mort parceque je suis Juif' (I am Yohan and I'm dead because I'am Jewish) at the site of the attack on a kosher market on January 10, 2015 in Paris, France. Four hostages and three suspects were killed when police ended two separate sieges at a kosher supermarket and a printing company on an industrial estate, following Wednesday's deadly attack on Charlie Hebdo magazine. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Richard Bord/Getty Images)
Supporters hold signs reading 'Je suis Charlie' (I am Charlie) as they observe a minute of silence in tribute to the victims of three days of terror and twin siege dramas that claimed 17 victims, including the victims of the first attack by armed gunmen on the offices of French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, before the French Top 14 rugby union match ASM Clermont vs CAB Brive at the Michelin stadium in Clermont-Ferrand, central France, on January 10, 2015. AFP PHOTO / THIERRY ZOCCOLAN (Photo credit should read THIERRY ZOCCOLAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of the GIGN (National Gendarmerie Intervention Group) sit in a helicopter flying over Dammartin-en-Goele where a hostage-taking was underway after police hunting the Islamist brothers who killed 12 people earlier this week exchanged fire with two men during a car chase, on January 9, 2015. Friday's drama unfolded almost 48 hours into a massive manhunt launched after the brothers burst into the office of the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo and gunned down staff members and two policemen, saying they were taking revenge for the magazine's publication of cartoons offensive to many Muslims. The number of people seized was not immediately confirmed. AFP PHOTO / JOEL SAGET (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
French riot officers patrol in Longpont, north of Paris, France, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. Scattered gunfire and explosions shook France on Thursday as its frightened yet defiant citizens held a day of mourning for 12 people slain at a Paris newspaper. French police hunted down the two heavily armed brothers suspected in the massacre to make sure they don't strike again. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
French police and gendarmes patrol in Dammartin-en-Goele where shots were fired and at least one hostage was taken in the same area police were hunting for two brothers accused of slaughtering 12 people in an Islamist assault, on January 9, 2015. The hostage drama was underway at a business in Dammartin-en-Goele, to the north-east of Paris, and came 48 hours into a massive manhunt for the Islamist gunmen who attacked the Charlie Hebdo offices on January 7. AFP PHOTO / JOEL SAGET (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 9: Police officers block a road near an industrial area where the suspects in the shooting attack at the satirical French magazine Charlie Hebdo headquarters are reportedly holding a hostage, in Dammartin-en-Goele, some 40 kilometres north-east of Paris, France, 09 January 2015. (Photo by Geoffroy Van der Hasselt/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 9: Police officers block a road near an industrial area where the suspects in the shooting attack at the satirical French magazine Charlie Hebdo headquarters are reportedly holding a hostage, in Dammartin-en-Goele, some 40 kilometres north-east of Paris, France, 09 January 2015. (Photo by Geoffroy Van der Hasselt/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Armed security forces fly overhead in a military helicopter in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris, Friday Jan. 9, 2015. French security forces swarmed this small industrial town northeast of Paris Friday in an operation to capture a pair of heavily armed suspects in the deadly storming of a satirical newspaper. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
An ambulance arrives in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris, Friday Jan. 9, 2015. Brothers suspected in a newspaper terror attack were cornered with a hostage inside a printing house on Friday, after they hijacked a car and police followed them to a village near Paris' main airport. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
Police and army forces take positions in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast Paris, as part of an operation to seize two heavily armed suspects, Friday, Jan. 9, 2015. French security forces swarmed a small industrial town northeast of Paris Friday in an operation to capture a pair of heavily armed suspects in the deadly storming of a satirical newspaper. Shots were fired as the brothers stole a car in the early morning hours, said a French security official, who could not immediately confirm reports of hostages taken or deaths later in the day in the town of Dammartin-en-Goele, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)
Police forces take positions in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast Paris, as part of an operation to seize two heavily armed suspects, Friday, Jan. 9, 2015. French security forces swarmed a small industrial town northeast of Paris Friday in an operation to capture a pair of heavily armed suspects in the deadly storming of a satirical newspaper. Shots were fired as the brothers stole a car in the early morning hours, said a French security official, who could not immediately confirm reports of hostages taken or deaths later in the day in the town of Dammartin-en-Goele, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 9: Police officers block a road near an industrial area where the suspects in the shooting attack at the satirical French magazine Charlie Hebdo headquarters are reportedly holding a hostage, in Dammartin-en-Goele, some 40 kilometres north-east of Paris, France, 09 January 2015. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Ambulances arrive in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast Paris, as part of an operation to seize two heavily armed suspects, Friday, Jan. 9, 2015. French security forces swarmed a small industrial town northeast of Paris Friday in an operation to capture a pair of heavily armed suspects in the deadly storming of a satirical newspaper. Shots were fired as the brothers stole a car in the early morning hours, said a French security official, who could not immediately confirm reports of hostages taken or deaths later in the day in the town of Dammartin-en-Goele, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)
French riot officers patrol in Longpont, north of Paris, France, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. Scattered gunfire and explosions shook France on Thursday as its frightened yet defiant citizens held a day of mourning for 12 people slain at a Paris newspaper. French police hunted down the two heavily armed brothers suspected in the massacre to make sure they don't strike again. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
Heavily armed police officers guard the General Directorate for Internal Security headquarters, seen in background, in Levallois Perret, outside Paris, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. Two brothers are suddenly the most wanted men in France, suspected of the armed onslaught on a newspaper office that claimed a dozen lives and horrified most of the world. Cherif Kouachi, 32, and Said Kouachi, 34, were the targets of a mammoth manhunt following Wednesday's slayings at the Paris offices of the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
Heavily armed police officers guard the General Directorate for Internal Security headquarters, in Levallois Perret, outside Paris, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. Two brothers are suddenly the most wanted men in France, suspected of the armed onslaught on a newspaper office that claimed a dozen lives and horrified this country and much of the world. Cherif Kouachi, 32, and Said Kouachi, 34, became the targets of a mammoth manhunt following Wednesday's murderous attack at the Charlie Hebdo offices in Paris. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
A heavily armed police officer guards the General Directorate for Internal Security headquarters, seen behind, in Levallois Perret, outside Paris, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. Two brothers are suddenly the most wanted men in France, suspected of the armed onslaught on a newspaper office that claimed a dozen lives and horrified this country and much of the world. Cherif Kouachi, 32, and Said Kouachi, 34, became the targets of a mammoth manhunt following Wednesday's murderous attack at the Charlie Hebdo offices in Paris. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
French police officers patrol in Longpont, north of Paris, France, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. Scattered gunfire and explosions shook France on Thursday as its frightened yet defiant citizens held a day of mourning for 12 people slain at a Paris newspaper. French police hunted down the two heavily armed brothers suspected in the massacre to make sure they don't strike again. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
French riot officers patrol in Longpont, north of Paris, France, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015. Scattered gunfire and explosions shook France on Thursday as its frightened yet defiant citizens held a day of mourning for 12 people slain at a Paris newspaper. French police hunted down the two heavily armed brothers suspected in the massacre to make sure they don't strike again. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
SWAT police officer patrol in the village of Longpont, north east of Paris, hunting down the two heavily armed brothers suspected in the massacre at Charlie Hebdo newspaper, Thursday, Jan.8, 2015. Scattered gunfire and explosions shook France on Thursday as its frightened yet defiant citizens held a day of mourning for 12 people slain at a Paris newspaper. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)
Police officers work at Paris Prefecture control room in Paris, Thursday Jan. 8, 2015. Two brothers are suddenly the most wanted men in France, suspected of the armed onslaught on a newspaper office that claimed a dozen lives and horrified this country and much of the world. Cherif Kouachi, 32, and Said Kouachi, 34, became the targets of a mammoth manhunt following Wednesday's murderous attack at the Charlie Hebdo offices in Paris. (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere, Pool)
French police release wanted poster for remaining 2 #CharlieHebdo suspects http://t.co/9LtrJ9hK2A http://t.co/4KAXiBBU3w
JUST IN: French police: Said Kouachi and Cherif Kouachi wanted in Paris terror attack: http://t.co/0WbSnKIrgE http://t.co/wjmMg9LveB
#BreakingNews: V @jpney :"We got you" ID #CharlieHebdo terrorists;Said KOUACHI,Sheirf Kouachi &Hamid Mourad #France http://t.co/Sx4D1Btykw
WH releases photo of Obama talking to @fhollande. @Elysee releases photo of conversation after #CharlieHebdo attack. http://t.co/4kXjBudfwl
#BreakingNews: Photo of Cherif Kouachi, the second terrorist accused of the attack against #CharlieHebdo via @jpney http://t.co/W2W7LHgmxk
Police released this warrant naming the suspected terror trio.
Forensic experts examine the car believed to have been used as the escape vehicle by gunmen who attacked the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris, France, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. Masked gunmen stormed the offices of a French satirical newspaper Wednesday, killing at least 11 people before escaping, police and a witness said. The weekly has previously drawn condemnation from Muslims. (AP Photo)
French President Francois Hollande, center, flanked with security forces arrives outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. Masked gunmen stormed the offices of a French satirical newspaper Wednesday, killing at least 11 people before escaping, police and a witness said. The weekly has previously drawn condemnation from Muslims. (AP Photo/Remy De La Mauviniere)
A truck tows the car used by armed gunmen who stormed the Paris offices of satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, killing 12 people, on January 7, 2015 in Paris. A source close to the investigation said two men 'armed with a Kalashnikov and a rocket-launcher' stormed the building in central Paris and 'fire was exchanged with security forces'. The source said a gunman had hijacked a car and knocked over a pedestrian while attempting to speed away. AFP PHOTO/DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
Ambulances gather in the street outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. Masked gunmen stormed the offices of a French satirical newspaper Wednesday, killing at least 11 people before escaping, police and a witness said. The weekly has previously drawn condemnation from Muslims. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
ADDS FULL NAME - FILE - In this Nov.2, 2011 file photo satirical French newspaper Charlie Hebdo's editor in chief, Stephane Charbonnier, also known as Charb, answers reporters in front of the headquarters of the newspaper, in Paris. Masked gunmen shouting "Allahu akbar!" stormed the Paris offices of a satirical newspaper Wednesday Jan.7, 2015, killing 12 people including the editor and a cartoonist before escaping. It was France's deadliest terror attack in at least two decades.(AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)
FILE - In this Sept.19, 2012 file photo, Charb , the publishing director of the satyric weekly Charlie Hebdo, displays the front page of the newspaper as he poses for photographers in Paris. Masked gunmen shouting “Allahu akbar!” stormed the Paris offices of a satirical newspaper Wednesday Jan.7, 2015, killing 12 people including Charb, before escaping. It was France's deadliest terror attack in at least two decades. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)
An injured person is transported to an ambulance after a shooting, at the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. Masked gunmen stormed the offices of the newspaper Wednesday, killing at least 11 people before escaping, police and a witness said. The weekly has previously drawn condemnation from Muslims. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
France's former President and leader of the right-wing UMP party Nicolas Sarkozy delivers a speech in Paris on January 7, 2015, as the capital was placed under the highest alert status after heavily armed gunmen shouting Islamist slogans stormed French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo and shot dead at least 12 people in the deadliest attack in France in four decades. Police launched a massive manhunt for the masked attackers who reportedly hijacked a car and sped off, running over a pedestrian and shooting at officers. AFP PHOTO / ERIC FEFERBERG (Photo credit should read ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
French Prime Minister Manuel Valls (C) listens to former director of the satirical political Charlie Hebdo Philippe Val (3rdL) outside of the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving 12 dead. Heavily armed gunmen shouting Islamist slogans stormed a Paris satirical newspaper office on January 7 and shot dead at least 12 people in the deadliest attack in France in four decades. Police launched a massive manhunt for the masked attackers who reportedly hijacked a car and sped off, running over a pedestrian and shooting at officers. AFP PHOTO / MARTIN BUREAU (Photo credit should read MARTIN BUREAU/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: Media gather at the scene after gunmen have attacked french satirical weekly 'Charlie Hebdo' at 10, Rue Nicolas Appert on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed including two police officers. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
A victim is evacuated on a stretcher on January 7, 2015 after armed gunmen stormed the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris, leaving at least 11 people dead. AFP PHOTO / MARTIN BUREAU (Photo credit should read MARTIN BUREAU/AFP/Getty Images)
Firefighters carry an injured man on a stretcher in front of the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving at least one dead according to a police source and 'six seriously injured' police officers according to City Hall. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE DUPEYRAT (Photo credit should read Philippe Dupeyrat/AFP/Getty Images)
Three gunmen carried out the attack in Paris. Here two of them http://t.co/8jNCu78Yqd
Map locating the Paris offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo #AFP http://t.co/nJYCABZqAG
How the terrorists win: @Telegraph is now blurring the cover Mohammed cartoon of #CharlieHebdo in its reporting http://t.co/DffGzIrQZI
Une minute de silence en ce moment au @le_Parisien en solidarité avec les victimes de @Charlie_Hebdo_ http://t.co/mY1d72AamT
French soldiers patrols at the Eiffel Tower after a shooting at a French satirical newspaper, in Paris, France, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. France reinforced security at houses of worship, stores, media offices and transportation after masked gunmen stormed the offices of a French satirical newspaper Wednesday, killing at least 11 people before escaping, police and a witness said. The weekly has previously drawn condemnation from Muslims. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
Can't sleep tonight, thoughts with my French cartooning colleagues, their families and loved ones #CharlieHebdo http://t.co/LqIMRCHPgK
French President Francois Hollande, center, flanked with security forces gestures, as he arrives outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. Masked gunmen stormed the offices of a French satirical newspaper Wednesday, killing at least 11 people before escaping, police and a witness said. The weekly has previously drawn condemnation from Muslims. (AP Photo/Remy De La Mauviniere)
French soldiers patrols at the Eiffel Tower after a shooting at a French satirical newspaper, in Paris, France, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. France reinforced security at houses of worship, stores, media offices and transportation after masked gunmen stormed the offices of a French satirical newspaper Wednesday, killing at least 11 people before escaping, police and a witness said. The weekly has previously drawn condemnation from Muslims. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: A general view of the scene at Charlie Hebdo offices after a deadly attack on the french satirical magazine on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed including two police officers. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
French Justice Minister Christiane Taubira (C) walks with Paris' prosecutor Francois Molins outside of the headquarters of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving twekve dead. At least 12 people were killed when gunmen armed with Kalashnikovs and a rocket-launcher opened fire in the offices of French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo on January 7. AFP PHOTO / MARTIN BUREAU (Photo credit should read MARTIN BUREAU/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: Poice officrs gather at Charlie Hebdo offices after a deadly attack on the french satirical magazine on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed including two police officers. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
French Justice Minister Christiane Taubira reacts outside of the headquarters of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving twekve dead. At least 12 people were killed when gunmen armed with Kalashnikovs and a rocket-launcher opened fire in the offices of French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo on January 7. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07 : Police officers take security measures as health workers gather near the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen attacked the offices leaving twelve dead, including two police officers. (Photo by Geoffroy Van der Hasselt S/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07 : Police officers take security measures near the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen attacked the offices leaving twelve dead, including two police officers. (Photo by Geoffroy Van der Hasselt S/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07 : Police officers take security measures near the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen attacked the offices leaving twelve dead, including two police officers. (Photo by Geoffroy Van der Hasselt S/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
French police officers and forensic experts examine the car used by armed gunmen who stormed the Paris offices of satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, killing 12 people, on January 7, 2015 in Paris. A source close to the investigation said two men 'armed with a Kalashnikov and a rocket-launcher' stormed the building in central Paris and 'fire was exchanged with security forces'. The source said a gunman had hijacked a car and knocked over a pedestrian while attempting to speed away. AFP PHOTO/DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
Police officers and firemen gather outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. Masked gunmen stormed the offices of a French satirical newspaper Wednesday, killing at least 11 people before escaping, police and a witness said. The weekly has previously drawn condemnation from Muslims. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
Firefighters and police officers gather in front of the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving eleven dead, including two police officers, according to sources close to the investigation. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
An injured person is treated by nursing staff outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. France has raised its alert to the highest level after what President Francois Hollande said was a "terror attack" at the offices of a satirical magazine in Paris. Xavier Castaing, head of communications for the Paris police prefecture, has confirmed that at least 11 people, including one journalist, were killed. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
Police officers and firemen gather outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. Masked gunmen stormed the offices of a French satirical newspaper Wednesday, killing at least 11 people before escaping, police and a witness said. The weekly has previously drawn condemnation from Muslims. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
An injured person is evacuated outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. Police official says 11 dead in shooting at the French satirical newspaper. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
ALERTE INFO - Cabu, Wolinski, Charb, Tignous sont morts, selon l'avocat de #CharlieHebdo http://t.co/V12m5QDkGA http://t.co/WC0G7YEMC8
The car used by armed gunmen who stormed the Paris offices of satirical newspaper #CharlieHebdo Photo D. Faget #AFP http://t.co/i7tKpzijq0
People stand outside the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo's office after a shooting, in Paris, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2015. Masked gunmen stormed the offices of a French satirical newspaper Wednesday, killing at least 11 people before escaping, police and a witness said. The weekly has previously drawn condemnation from Muslims. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
Les tireurs de #ChalieHebdo face à une voiture de police. Ils ont fait feu, les policiers ont répliqué puis reculé http://t.co/Ld1sxkRLvW
Police officers gather near the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving eleven dead, including two police officers, according to sources close to the investigation. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE DUPEYRAT (Photo credit should read Philippe Dupeyrat/AFP/Getty Images)
11 dead in shooting at French satirical newspaper in Paris http://t.co/aLnz6IYmUS Gun free zones do NOT work #2A http://t.co/Dczb44upVL
Firefighters and rescue services gather near the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving eleven dead, including two police officers, according to sources close to the investigation. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE DUPEYRAT (Photo credit should read Philippe Dupeyrat/AFP/Getty Images)
Aucun acte barbare ne saura jamais éteindre la liberté de la presse. Nous sommes un pays unis qui saura réagir et faire bloc.
A victim is evacuated on a stretcher on January 7, 2015 after armed gunmen stormed the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris, leaving at least 11 people dead. AFP PHOTO / MARTIN BUREAU (Photo credit should read MARTIN BUREAU/AFP/Getty Images)
Firefighters carry an injured man on a stretcher in front of the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving at least 10 people dead. AFP PHOTO / MARTIN BUREAU (Photo credit should read MARTIN BUREAU/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS SHOOTING: Hollande to hold emergency govt meeting, heads to the scene - pres office http://t.co/Q27XnP3AS3 http://t.co/JWziWCMdTr
Quartier bouclé par la police. Déclaration attendue de Hollande. #ChalieHebdo @LePoint http://t.co/t85yNGjuqZ
#BREAKING 11 Dead including some journalists after masked gunmen storm newspaper in France. Live pics nxt @News4Today http://t.co/lwTXVqCoKK
Police forces gather in street outside the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving at least 10 people dead according to prosecutors. AFP PHOTO / MARTIN BUREAU (Photo credit should read MARTIN BUREAU/AFP/Getty Images)
France: 10 feared dead as gunshots fired at French satirical weekly #CharlieHebdo http://t.co/zUw5rfnfFO http://t.co/ZVyF1UtRNV
Here's more on the #CharlieHebdo shooting in Paris http://t.co/zOC9CFPR0T http://t.co/theZZhvjXm
VIDEO from the scene of fatal shooting in Paris http://t.co/sL3aG464Lt #CharlieHebdo http://t.co/FLC3mR5C2S
A photo taken on January 7, 2015 shows a bullet's impact on the window of the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving at least 11 people dead. AFP PHOTO / MARTIN BUREAU (Photo credit should read MARTIN BUREAU/AFP/Getty Images)
France's interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve (C, L) and Paris' Mayor Anne Hidalgo (C, R) arrive at the headquarters of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving at least 11 people dead. AFP PHOTO / MARTIN BUREAU (Photo credit should read MARTIN BUREAU/AFP/Getty Images)
A photo taken on January 7, 2015 shows a bullet's impact on the window of the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving at least 10 people dead. AFP PHOTO / MARTIN BUREAU (Photo credit should read MARTIN BUREAU/AFP/Getty Images)
Firefighters and police officers gather in front of the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving eleven dead, including two police officers, according to sources close to the investigation. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
Firefighters and police officers gather near the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving eleven dead, including two police officers, according to sources close to the investigation. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE DUPEYRAT (Photo credit should read Philippe Dupeyrat/AFP/Getty Images)
Firefighters and police officers gather in front of the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving eleven dead, including two police officers, according to sources close to the investigation. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
French president François Hollande leaves the Palais de l'Elysee to go to the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving at least 10 people dead. AFP PHOTO / PATRICK KOVARIK (Photo credit should read PATRICK KOVARIK/AFP/Getty Images)
French president François Hollande leaves the Palais de l'Elysee to go to the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving at least 10 people dead. AFP PHOTO / PATRICK KOVARIK (Photo credit should read PATRICK KOVARIK/AFP/Getty Images)
France's interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve (C, L) and Paris' Mayor Anne Hidalgo (C, R) arrive at the headquarters of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving at least 11 people dead. AFP PHOTO / MARTIN BUREAU (Photo credit should read MARTIN BUREAU/AFP/Getty Images)
French president François Hollande leaves the Palais de l'Elysee to go to the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving at least 10 people dead. AFP PHOTO / PATRICK KOVARIK (Photo credit should read PATRICK KOVARIK/AFP/Getty Images)
French President Francois Hollande (2ndL) talks to the press next to Paris' Mayor Anne Hidalgo (C) upon his arrival at the headquarters of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen stormed the offices leaving eleven dead, including two police officers, according to sources close to the investigation. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARD (Photo credit should read KENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07 : The Imam of the eastern suburb of Drancy, Hassen Chalghoumi speaks to media as police officers take security measures near the offices of the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7, 2015, after armed gunmen attacked the offices leaving twelve dead, including two police officers. (Photo by Geoffroy Van der Hasselt /Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: A general view of the scene after gunmen have attacked french satirical weekly 'Charlie Hebdo' at 10, Rue Nicolas Appert on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed including two police officers. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - JANUARY 07: Candles and a cartoon lies on the ground while people gather at a vigil in front of the French Embassy following the terrorist attack in Paris on January 7, 2015 in Berlin, Germany. Twelve people were killed including two police officers as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Carsten Koall/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - JANUARY 07: A man holds a candle while other people gather at a vigil in front of the French Embassy following the terrorist attack in Paris on January 7, 2015 in Berlin, Germany. Twelve people were killed including two police officers as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Carsten Koall/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - JANUARY 07: People gather at a vigil in front of the French Embassy following the terrorist attack in Paris on January 7, 2015 in Berlin, Germany. Twelve people were killed including two police officers as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Carsten Koall/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - JANUARY 07: A woman holds a candle while other people gather at a vigil in front of the French Embassy following the terrorist attack in Paris on January 7, 2015 in Berlin, Germany. Twelve people were killed including two police officers as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Carsten Koall/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - JANUARY 07: A man holds a pencil while other people gather at a vigil in front of the French Embassy following the terrorist attack in Paris on January 7, 2015 in Berlin, Germany. Twelve people were killed including two police officers as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Carsten Koall/Getty Images)
A woman takes part in a gathering on the Old Harbor in Marseille on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy. AFP PHOTO / ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT (Photo credit should read ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - JANUARY 07: Women hold a placard reading 'Je Suis Charli' (I am Charlie) as a French flag flies on the wind during a gathering of people showing their support for the victims of the terrorist attack at French magazine Charlie Hebdo, in front of the Embassy of France on January 7, 2015 in Madrid, Spain. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the magazine offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris, France. (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)
A woman holds a placard reading 'We are all Charlie' during a gathering on the Old Harbor in Marseille on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy. AFP PHOTO / ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT (Photo credit should read ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/Getty Images)
People hold a vigil at the Old Harbor in Marseille on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo, in the French capital. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy. AFP PHOTO / ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT (Photo credit should read ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/Getty Images)
The frontpage of last issue of French satyrical newspaper Charlie Hebdo is seen during a gathering in support of the victims of the terrorist attack on Charlie Hebdo, in front of French Embassy in Madrid, on January 7, 2015. Gunmen killed 12 people in an attack today in the offices of the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo in the most deadly attack in France since the 1954-1962 Algerian war. AFP PHOTO/ GERARD JULIEN (Photo credit should read GERARD JULIEN/AFP/Getty Images)
People stand around candles set near placards reading 'I am Charlie' during a gathering at the Place de la Republique (Republic square) in Paris, on January 7, 2015, to show solidarity for the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO ERIC FEFERBERG (Photo credit should read ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
Candles are displayed during a gathering in Lyon, central eastern France, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy.AFP PHOTO / JEFF PACHOUD (Photo credit should read JEFF PACHOUD/AFP/Getty Images)
A man holds a placard reading 'I am Charlie' on the Old Harbor in Marseille, southern France, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy. AFP PHOTO / ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT (Photo credit should read ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/Getty Images)
A man lights candles near placards reading 'I am Charlie' during a gathering in Paris, on January 7, 2015, to show solidarity for the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO ERIC FEFERBERG (Photo credit should read ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
Womans hold a banner that reads in French, 'I am Charlie' during a vigil at the Old Harbor in Marseille on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo in Paris earlier in the day. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy. AFP PHOTO / ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT (Photo credit should read ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman lights a candle during a gathering in Lyon, central eastern France, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy.AFP PHOTO / JEFF PACHOUD (Photo credit should read JEFF PACHOUD/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman lights a candle during a gathering in Lyon, central eastern France, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy.AFP PHOTO / JEFF PACHOUD (Photo credit should read JEFF PACHOUD/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman holds a paper reading 'Freedom of expression ' during a gathering at the Place de la Republique (Republic square) in Paris, on January 7, 2015, to show solidarity for the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO JOEL SAGET (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman holds up an issue of Frenc satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo during a gathering at the Place de la Republique (Republic square) in Paris, on January 7, 2015, to show solidarity for the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO JOEL SAGET (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
People and lit candles forming the words 'Charlie Hebdo' are reflected in large mirror panels on the Old Port of Marseille, southern France, on January 7, 2015, during a gathering following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed men shouting 'Allahu Akbar' stormed the Paris headquarters of a satirical weekly on January 7, killing 12 people in cold blood in the worst attack in France in decades. AFP PHOTO / ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT (Photo credit should read ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/Getty Images)
Candles, and a sign that reads in French, 'weep' are placed on the ground as people hold a candle lit vigil at the Old Harbour in Marseille, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy. AFP PHOTO / ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT (Photo credit should read ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman holds a banner that reads in French, 'I am Charlie' at the Old Harbor in Marseille on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy. AFP PHOTO / ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT (Photo credit should read ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman holds an issue of Frenc satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo during a gathering at the Place de la Republique (Republic square) in Paris, on January 7, 2015, to show solidarity for the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO JOEL SAGET (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A man holds up a placard bearing the picture of late cartoonist Cabu and reading 'Cabu to the pantheon' during a gathering at the Place de la Republique (Republic square) in Paris, on January 7, 2015, to show solidarity for the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people, including 4 cartoonists on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO JOEL SAGET (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - JANUARY 07: People hold placards reading 'Je Suis Charli' (I am Charlie) as another one holds a front page of 'Charlie Hebdo' newspaper during a gathering of people showing their support for the victims of the terrorist attack at French magazine Charlie Hebdo, in front of the Embassy of France on January 7, 2015 in Madrid, Spain. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the magazine offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris, France. (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)
Candles, a rose and a sign that reads in French, 'I am Charlie' are placed on the ground as people hold a candle lit vigil at the Old Harbour in Marseille, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy. AFP PHOTO / ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT (Photo credit should read ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/Getty Images)
People hold A placard 'We are all Charlie' during a gathering at the Place de la Republique (Republic square) in Paris, on January 7, 2015, to show their solidarity for the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO JOEL SAGET (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - JANUARY 07: A woman holds a placard reading 'Je Suis Charli' (I am Charlie) during a gathering of people showing their support for the victims of the terrorist attack at French magazine Charlie Hebdo, in front of the Embassy of France on January 7, 2015 in Madrid, Spain. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the magazine offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris, France. (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - JANUARY 07: People hold placards reading 'Je Suis Charli' (I am Charlie) during a gathering of people showing their support for the victims of the terrorist attack at French magazine Charlie Hebdo, in front of the Embassy of France on January 7, 2015 in Madrid, Spain. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the magazine offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris, France. (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - JANUARY 07: A woman holds a placard reading 'Je Suis Charli' (I am Charlie) during a gathering of people showing their support for the victims of the terrorist attack at French magazine Charlie Hebdo, in front of the Embassy of France on January 7, 2015 in Madrid, Spain. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the magazine offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris, France. (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)
Women stick a poster bearing the last cartoon of late cartoonist Charb on a bus station in Paris, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed men shouting 'Allahu Akbar' stormed the Paris headquarters of a satirical weekly on Wednesday, killing 12 people in cold blood in the worst attack in France in decades. Victims included four prominent cartoonists, including the chief editor, Charb, who had been holding a morning meeting when the assailants armed with Kalashnikovs burst in and opened fire, officials said. AFP PHOTO /ERIC FEFERBERG (Photo credit should read ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
People hold up signs that read in French, ' I am Charlie' as they rally to pay tribute in Marseille, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo in Paris earlier in the day. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy. AFP PHOTO / BORIS HORVAT (Photo credit should read BORIS HORVAT/AFP/Getty Images)
People hold up a sign that read in French, ' Neither Terrorism or Racism' as they rally to pay tribute in Marseille, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo in Paris earlier in the day. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy. AFP PHOTO / BORIS HORVAT (Photo credit should read BORIS HORVAT/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: A young person holds a poster saying 'Racism is stupid !!!' as crowds gather at 'Place de la Republique' for a vigil following the terrorist attack earlier today on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
MADRID, SPAIN - JANUARY 07: A woman reacts as another woman holds a placard reading 'Reporters without borders, for freedom of press' during a gathering of people showing their support for the victims of the terrorist attack at French magazine Charlie Hebdo, in front of the Embassy of France on January 7, 2015 in Madrid, Spain. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the magazine offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris, France. (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: A person holds a pen, symbol of liberty of press, as crowds gather at 'Place de la Republique' during a vigil following the terrorist attack earlier today on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: People hold a poster saying 'The liberty of press is priceless. Any fundamentalism won't pass' as crowds gather at 'Place de la Republique' for a vigil following the terrorist attack earlier today on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: A man holds a sign saying 'We are Charlie' as crowds gather at 'Place de la Republique' for a vigil following the terrorist attack earlier today on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: A sign saying 'Je suis Charlie' as crowds gather at 'Place de la Republique' for a vigil following the terrorist attack earlier today on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: People hold a candles as crowds gather at 'Place de la Republique' for a vigil following the terrorist attack earlier today on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
People hold up signs that read in French, ' I am Charlie' and 'Their Islam is not ours' (C) as they rally to pay tribute in Marseille, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo in Paris earlier in the day. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy. AFP PHOTO / BORIS HORVAT (Photo credit should read BORIS HORVAT/AFP/Getty Images)
People light candles in solidarity with the victims of the terror attack on the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo in Paris earlier today, outside the French embassy in Stockholm, January 7, 2015. AFP PHOTO / TT NEWS AGENCY / CLAUDIO BRESCIANI ** SWEDEN OUT ** (Photo credit should read Claudio Bresciani/AFP/Getty Images)
A man holds a poster reading 'I am Charlie' in solidarity with the victims of the terror attack on the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo in Paris earlier today, outside the French embassy in Stockholm, January 7, 2015. AFP PHOTO / TT NEWS AGENCY / CLAUDIO BRESCIANI ** SWEDEN OUT ** (Photo credit should read Claudio Bresciani/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: Crowds gather at 'Place de la Republique' during a vigil following the terrorist attack earlier today on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
People gather to light candles under large mirror panels on the Old Port of Marseille, southern France, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed men shouting 'Allahu Akbar' stormed the Paris headquarters of a satirical weekly on January 7, killing 12 people in cold blood in the worst attack in France in decades. AFP PHOTO / ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT (Photo credit should read ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: Crowds gather at 'Place de la Republique' for a vigil following the terrorist attack earlier today on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: A man holds up his phone displaying the words 'Je suis Charlie' as crowds gather at 'Place de la Republique' for a vigil following the terrorist attack earlier today on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
People gather to light candles under large mirror panels on the Old Port of Marseille, southern France, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed men shouting 'Allahu Akbar' stormed the Paris headquarters of a satirical weekly on January 7, killing 12 people in cold blood in the worst attack in France in decades. AFP PHOTO / ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT (Photo credit should read ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: Parisians hold a poster saying 'Students, Journalists, United' as crowds gather at 'Place de la Republique' in solidarity with murdered 'Charlie Hebdo' journalists on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Gunmen have attacked french satirical weekly 'Charlie Hebdo' at 10, Rue Nicolas Appert on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed including two police officers. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: A woman holds a candle and a pen, symbol of liberty of press, as crowds gather at 'Place de la Republique' for a vigil following the terrorist attack earlier today on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
People hold placards reading, 'I am Charlie' in Clermont-Ferrand, on January 7, 2015, during a rally in support of the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO THIERRY ZOCCOLAN (Photo credit should read THIERRY ZOCCOLAN/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: Signs saying 'Je suis Charlie' are held up as crowds gather at 'Place de la Republique' for a vigil following the terrorist attack earlier today on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: People hold signs saying 'Je suis Charlie' as crowds gather at 'Place de la Republique' for a vigil following the terrorist attack earlier today on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 07: A man holds up his tablet displaying the words 'Je suis Charlie' as crowds gather at 'Place de la Republique' for a vigil following the terrorist attack earlier today on January 7, 2015 in Paris, France. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
People holds pens in the air and show messages on mobile phones at a gathering in Trafalgar Square in central London to show their respect for the twelve people killed in Paris today in a terrorist attack at the headquarters of satirical publication 'Charlie Hebdo' on January 7, 2015. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
People gather in Trafalgar Square in central London to show their respect for the twelve people killed in Paris today in a terrorist attack at the headquarters of satirical publication 'Charlie Hebdo' on January 7, 2015. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
People hold posters as they gather in Trafalgar Square in central London to show their respect for the twelve people killed in Paris today in a terrorist attack at the headquarters of satirical publication 'Charlie Hebdo' on January 7, 2015. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
BARCELONA, SPAIN - JANUARY 07: People hold pencils up during a gathering of people showing their support for the victims of the terrorist attack at French magazine Charlie Hebdo, in front of the Consulate of France on January 7, 2015 in Barcelona, Spain. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the magazine offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris, France. (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)
BARCELONA, SPAIN - JANUARY 07: People light candles on a Charlie Hebdo Magazine during a gathering of people showing their support for the victims of the terrorist attack at French magazine Charlie Hebdo, in front of the Consulate of France on January 7, 2015 in Barcelona, Spain. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the magazine offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris, France. (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)
BARCELONA, SPAIN - JANUARY 07: A woman holds a banner with a pencil painted during a gathering of people showing their support for the victims of the terrorist attack at French magazine Charlie Hebdo, in front of the Consulate of France on January 7, 2015 in Barcelona, Spain. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the magazine offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris, France. (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)
BARCELONA, SPAIN - JANUARY 07: People hold pencils up during a gathering of people showing their support for the victims of the terrorist attack at French magazine Charlie Hebdo, in front of the Consulate of France on January 7, 2015 in Barcelona, Spain. Twelve people were killed, including two police officers, as two gunmen opened fire at the magazine offices of Charlie Hebdo in Paris, France. (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)
Pens are held in the air as people gather in Trafalgar Square in central London to show their respect for the twelve people killed in Paris today in a terrorist attack at the headquarters of satirical publication 'Charlie Hebdo' on January 7, 2015. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman holds a placard reading, 'I am Charlie' in Clermont-Ferrand, on January 7, 2015, during a rally in support of the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO THIERRY ZOCCOLAN (Photo credit should read THIERRY ZOCCOLAN/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman holds a placard reading, 'We are all Charlie' in Clermont-Ferrand, on January 7, 2015, during a rally in support of the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO THIERRY ZOCCOLAN (Photo credit should read THIERRY ZOCCOLAN/AFP/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - JANUARY 7: People gather to protest gun attack on satirical magazine 'Charlie Hebdo' in Paris, in front of French Embassy building in Berlin, Germany, on January 7, 2015. (Photo by Cuneyt Karadag/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - JANUARY 7: French Ambassador Philippe Etienne (R) and Thomas Oppermann (C), German politician with the Social Democratic Party (SPD), light candles as people gather to protest gun attack on satirical magazine 'Charlie Hebdo' in Paris, in front of French Embassy building in Berlin, Germany, on January 7, 2015. (Photo by Cuneyt Karadag/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
A woman holds a placard reading, 'I am Charlie' in Clermont-Ferrand, on January 7, 2015, during a rally in support of the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO THIERRY ZOCCOLAN (Photo credit should read THIERRY ZOCCOLAN/AFP/Getty Images)
A person holds a placard reading, 'I am Charlie' in Clermont-Ferrand, on January 7, 2015, during a rally in support of the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO THIERRY ZOCCOLAN (Photo credit should read THIERRY ZOCCOLAN/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 07: A man holds a poster reading 'Je suis Charlie' (I am Charlie) during a vigil in Trafalgar Square for victims of the terrorist attack in Paris on January 7, 2015 in London, United Kingdom. Twelve people were killed including two police officers as two gunmen opened fire at the offices of the French satirical publication Charlie Hebdo. (Photo by Rob Stothard/Getty Images)
People hold posters as they gather in Trafalgar Square in central London to show their respect for the twelve people killed in Paris today in a terrorist attack at the headquarters of satirical publication 'Charlie Hebdo' on January 7, 2015. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
A person holds a placard reading, 'I am Charlie' in Clermont-Ferrand, on January 7, 2015, during a rally in support of the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO THIERRY ZOCCOLAN (Photo credit should read THIERRY ZOCCOLAN/AFP/Getty Images)
A young woman holds a poster as people gather in Trafalgar Square in central London to show their respect for the twelve people killed in Paris today in a terrorist attack at the headquarters of satirical publication 'Charlie Hebdo' on January 7, 2015. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
People hold posters as people gather in Trafalgar Square in central London to show their respect for the twelve people killed in Paris today in a terrorist attack at the headquarters of satirical publication 'Charlie Hebdo' on January 7, 2015. AFP PHOTO / LEON NEAL (Photo credit should read LEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images)
A person holds a placard reading, 'I am Charlie' as others raise pens in Clermont-Ferrand, on January 7, 2015, during a rally in support of the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO THIERRY ZOCCOLAN (Photo credit should read THIERRY ZOCCOLAN/AFP/Getty Images)
People hold placards reading in French 'I am Charlie' during a gathering in front of the prefecture in Lille, northern France, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed men shouting 'Allahu Akbar' stormed the Paris headquarters of a satirical weekly on January 7, killing 12 people in cold blood in the worst attack in France in decades. AFP PHOTO / DENIS CHARLET (Photo credit should read DENIS CHARLET/AFP/Getty Images)
A person holds placards reading 'Charlie, Defend me .. against the extremes, against the FN (French far-right political party Front National), against bullshit, for liberty' (C) ; 'Love is stronger than hate' and 'I am Charlie', during a gathering at the Place de la Republique (Republic square) in Paris, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy. AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
Women hold placards reading 'I am Charlie' (L) and 'Together against barbarism' during a gathering in Toulouse on January 7, 2015, in solidarity for the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO / ERIC CABANIS (Photo credit should read ERIC CABANIS/AFP/Getty Images)
People hold placards reading 'I am Charlie' during a gathering in support of the victims of the terrorist attack on French satyrical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, in front of French Embassy in Madrid, on January 7, 2015. Gunmen killed 12 people in an attack today in the offices of the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo in the most deadly attack in France since the 1954-1962 Algerian war. AFP PHOTO/ GERARD JULIEN (Photo credit should read GERARD JULIEN/AFP/Getty Images)
people holds placards reading 'I am Charlie' during a gathering in Toulouse on January 7, 2015, in solidarity for the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO / ERIC CABANIS (Photo credit should read ERIC CABANIS/AFP/Getty Images)
A man holds a drawing during a gathering at the Place de la Republique (Republic square) in Paris, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy. AFP PHOTO / ERIC FEFERBERG ***ALTERNATIVE CROP*** (Photo credit should read ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
people gather in Toulouse on January 7, 2015, to show their solidarity for the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO / ERIC CABANIS (Photo credit should read ERIC CABANIS/AFP/Getty Images)
People hold placards with the front pages of several editions of Charlie Hebdo magazine during a gathering on January 7, 2015 in Lille, northern France, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed men shouting 'Allahu Akbar' stormed the Paris headquarters of a satirical weekly on January 7, killing 12 people in cold blood in the worst attack in France in decades. AFP PHOTO / DENIS CHARLET (Photo credit should read DENIS CHARLET/AFP/Getty Images)
people hold placards reading 'I am Charlie' during a gathering in Toulouse on January 7, 2015, in support for the victims of the attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed gunmen massacred 12 people on Wednesday after bursting into the Paris offices of a satirical weekly that had long outraged Muslims with controversial cartoons of the prophet Mohammed. AFP PHOTO / ERIC CABANIS (Photo credit should read ERIC CABANIS/AFP/Getty Images)
People light candles forming the name Charlie during a gathering in Strasbourg, eastern France, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo. Heavily armed men shouting 'Allahu Akbar' stormed the Paris headquarters of a satirical weekly on January 7, killing 12 people in cold blood in the worst attack in France in decades. AFP PHOTO / PATRICK HERTZOG (Photo credit should read PATRICK HERTZOG/AFP/Getty Images)
A WOman lays a candle during a gathering at the Place de la Republique (Republic square) in Paris, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy. AFP PHOTO / JOEL SAGET (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A man holds a candle and placard that reads in French, 'I am Charlie' during a gathering in Strasbourg, eastern France, on January 7, 2015, following an attack by unknown gunmen on the offices of the satirical weekly, Charlie Hebdo. France's Muslim leadership sharply condemned the shooting at the Paris satirical weekly that left at least 12 people dead as a 'barbaric' attack and an assault on press freedom and democracy. AFP PHOTO / PATRICK HERTZOG (Photo credit should read PATRICK HERTZOG/AFP/Getty Images)
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PARIS (AP) - France's prime minister demanded tougher anti-terrorism measures Tuesday after deadly attacks that some call this country's Sept. 11 - and that may already be leading to a crackdown on liberties in exchange for greater security.

Police told The Associated Press that the weapons used came from abroad, as authorities in several countries searched for possible accomplices and the sources of financing for last week's attacks on the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police. A new suspect was identified in Bulgaria.

"We must not lower our guard, at any time," Prime Minister Manuel Valls told Parliament, adding that "serious and very high risks remain."

Lawmakers in the often argumentative chamber lined up overwhelmingly behind the government, giving repeated standing ovations to Valls' rousing, indignant address - and then voted 488-1 to extend French airstrikes against Islamic State extremists in Iraq.

"France is at war against terrorism, jihadism, and radical Islamism," Valls declared. "France is not at war against Islam."

He called for increased surveillance of imprisoned radicals and told the interior minister to quickly come up with new security proposals.

French police say as many as six members of the terrorist cell that carried out the Paris attacks may still be at large, including a man seen driving a car registered to the widow of one of the gunmen. The country has deployed 10,000 troops to protect sensitive sites, including Jewish schools and synagogues, mosques and travel hubs.

Several people are being sought in connection with the "substantial" financing of the three gunmen behind the terror campaign, said Christophe Crepin, a French police union official. The gunmen's weapons stockpile came from abroad, and the size of it, plus the military sophistication of the attacks, indicated an organized terror network, he added.

"This cell did not include just those three. We think with all seriousness that they had accomplices, because of the weaponry, the logistics and the costs of it," Crepin said. "These are heavy weapons. When I talk about things like a rocket launcher - it's not like buying a baguette on the corner. It's for targeted acts."

Speaking to legislators in London, the head of the European police agency Europol, Rob Wainwright, said that 3,000 to 5,000 European nationals have gone to fight in the Mideast, calling it a "startling figure" and "the most serious threat Europe has faced since 9/11."

He urged better intel sharing, saying later to the BBC: "The way the network is diffuse in nature, not homogenous, not centralized, but a gathering of thousands of independent and semi-independent actors makes it very, very difficult for the security agencies to monitor it wholesale."

In a sign that French judicial authorities were using laws against defending terrorism to their fullest extent, a man who had praised the terror attacks while resisting arrest on a drunk driving violation was swiftly sentenced to four years in prison.

While the attacks have left France in jitters, some warned against going as far as a French version of the U.S. Patriot Act passed after Sept. 11.

"This must not lead to the renouncing of fundamental freedoms, otherwise we prove right those who come to fight on our soil," former Prime Minister Francois Fillon said on France-Inter radio.

The investigation spread to yet another country: A Bulgarian prosecutor announced that a Frenchman jailed since Jan. 1 had ties to Cherif Kouachi, one of the brothers who carried out the Charlie Hebdo attack.

The man, identified by French prosecutors as Joachim Fritz-Joly, was arrested as he tried to cross into Turkey. He was facing two European arrest warrants, one citing his alleged links to a terrorist organization and a second for allegedly kidnapping his 3-year-old son and smuggling him out of the country, said Darina Slavova, the regional prosecutor for Bulgaria's southern province of Haskovo.

"He met with Kouachi several times at the end of December," Slavova said. The child was sent back to his mother in France.

At a hearing in Haskovo on Tuesday, authorities decided to keep Fritz-Joly in custody until another hearing to determine whether he will be extradited to France. The Frenchman told the court he had known Cherif Kouachi since childhood.

"A man can have friends and they can do whatever they want, but I am simply going on vacation and have nothing to do with it," he told the court.

Kouachi and his older brother, Said, killed 12 people at the satirical paper's offices on Jan. 7, while their friend, Amedy Coulibaly, killed a French policewoman Thursday and four hostages Friday in a Paris kosher grocery. All three claimed ties to Islamic extremists in the Middle East - the Kouachis to al-Qaida in Yemen and Coulibaly to the Islamic State group.

All three gunmen died Friday in clashes with French police.

Authorities were searching around Paris for the Mini Cooper registered to Hayat Boumeddiene, Coulibaly's widow, who Turkish officials say is now in Syria. French police also sought the person or persons who filmed and posted a video of Coulibaly explaining how the attacks in Paris would unfold.

Earlier Tuesday, in ceremonies thousands of miles apart, France and Israel paid tribute to the victims of the terror attacks.

At police headquarters in Paris, French President Francois Hollande placed Legion of Honor medals on the flag-draped caskets of the three police officers killed in the attacks.

France will be "merciless in the face of anti-Semitic, anti-Muslim acts, and unrelenting against those who defend and carry out terrorism, notably the jihadists who go to Iraq and Syria," Hollande vowed.

A ceremonial unit of the New York Police Department, including Muslim officers, was among those attending the service for the slain officers.

As Chopin's funeral march played and the caskets were led from the building, a procession began in Jerusalem for the four Jewish victims at the kosher store.

Defying the bloodshed and terror of last week, a caricature of the Prophet Muhammad was to appear Wednesday on the cover of the latest issue of Charlie Hebdo, weeping and holding a placard with the words "I am Charlie."

Criticism and threats immediately appeared on militant websites, with calls for more strikes against the newspaper and anonymous threats from radicals, according to the SITE Intelligence Group, a U.S.-based terrorism monitor.

Charlie Hebdo, which lampoons religion indiscriminately, had received threats after depicting Muhammad before.

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France: Terror funding, attack weapons came from abroad
This photo shows a page in the ultra-Orthodox HaMevaser newspaper, containing a manipulated photo of world leaders marching in Paris, France on Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015, digitally omitting German Chancellor Angela Merkel. The small Jewish newspaper in Israel is making waves internationally for removing Merkel from a photo of last week's Paris march out of modesty. HaMevaser readers could not know that, however, as her picture was digitally removed, leaving Abbas standing next to Hollande. Israeli media joked it was meant to bring Abbas closer to Israeli premier Benjamin Netanyahu, who was standing nearby. (AP Photo/HaMevaser Newspaper)
From the left, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, former French President Nicolas Sarkozy, Malian President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita, French President Francois Hollande, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, EU president Donald Tusk and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas march during a rally in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Philippe Wojazer, Pool)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A memorial is seen near the Charlie Hebdo offices during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A memorial is seen near the Charlie Hebdo offices during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A memorial is seen near the Charlie Hebdo offices during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A memorial is seen near the Charlie Hebdo offices during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A memorial is seen near the Charlie Hebdo offices during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A memorial is seen near the Charlie Hebdo offices during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
A man holds up a placard that reads "I am Charlie" at the Place de la Nation in Paris Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. More than 40 world leaders, their arms linked, marched through Paris Sunday to rally for unity and freedom of expression and to honor 17 victims of three days of terrorist attacks. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)
A girl holds up a placard that reads "I am Charlie" in several languages at the Place de la Nation in Paris Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. More than 40 world leaders, their arms linked, marched through Paris Sunday to rally for unity and freedom of expression and to honor 17 victims of three days of terrorist attacks. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)
Signs hang at the French Alliance community center in solidarity with the victims of recent attacks in France, in Quito, Ecuador, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. People gathered to honor the victims of the shootings at the Paris satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo and a kosher supermarket in France. Demonstrations were held Sunday in cities around France and around the world. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)
A woman holds a sign that reads in French "I am Charlie" during a gathering in solidarity with the victims of recent attacks in France at the French Alliance community center in Quito, Ecuador, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. People gathered to honor the victims of the shootings at the Paris satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo and a kosher supermarket in France. Demonstrations were held Sunday in cities around France and around the world. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)
People wave national flags and hold placards that read "I am Charlie" at the Place de la Nation in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. More than 40 world leaders, their arms linked, marched through Paris Sunday to rally for unity and freedom of expression and to honor 17 victims of three days of terrorist attacks. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)
French expatriates David Nalmin, right, Gabriel Giraldi, and American Patty Rasmussen carry a French flag during a silent walk through Piedmont Park in Atlanta, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015, to support France after a three-day terrorism spree around Paris that killed 17 people last week. (AP Photo/John Amis)
The crowd march in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. Hundreds of thousands of people marched through Paris on Sunday in a massive show of unity and defiance in the face of terrorism that killed 17 people in France's bleakest moment in half a century. Banner reads: Press is Charlie. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani)
Israelis, mostly French Jews, light candles as the names of the victims are placed during a gathering to pay tribute to victims of the attack on the kosher supermarket in Paris where four hostages were killed on Friday, in Netanya, Israel, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
People start gathering at Republique square before the demonstration, in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani)
Joel Mergui, left, president of the French Jewish Consistory, Roger Cukierman, center, President of the Representative Council of France's Jewish Associations (CRIF) and Sacha Reingewirtz, head of the Jewish Students of France, answer reporters after a meeting with French President Francois Hollande at the Elysee Palace in Paris, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/David Azia)
Children and adults start gathering at Republique square before the demonstration, in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani)
French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve, left, welcomes Britain's Interior Minister Theresa May before the start of an international meeting aimed at fighting terrorism, in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
U.S Attorney General Eric Holder, left, is welcomed by French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve before the start of an international meeting aimed at fighting terrorism, in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
Belgian Interior Minister Jan Jambon, left, is welcomed by French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve before the start of an international meeting aimed at fighting terrorism, in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
Members of the Union of French Jewish place candles during a demonstration outside a kosher grocery store where four hostages were killed on Friday in Paris, Saturday, Jan. 10, 2015. Hundreds of thousands of people marched Saturday in cities from Toulouse in the south to Rennes in the west to honor the victims, and Paris expects hundreds of thousands more at Sunday’s unity rally. More than 2,000 police are being deployed, in addition to thousands already guarding synagogues, mosques, schools and other sites around France. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Laura Dugué, originally of Toulouse, France, symbolically holds a pen in the air as several hundred people gather in solidarity with victims of two terrorist attacks in Paris, one at the office of weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo and another at a kosher market, in New York's Washington Square Park, Saturday, Jan. 10, 2015. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)
French Prime Minister Manuel Valls, left, waves to the public as he enters in his car during a demonstration organized by members of the Union of French Jewish students outside a kosher grocery store where four hostages were killed on Friday in Paris, Saturday, Jan. 10, 2015. Hundreds of thousands of people marched Saturday in cities from Toulouse in the south to Rennes in the west to honor the victims, and Paris expects hundreds of thousands more at Sunday’s unity rally. More than 2,000 police are being deployed, in addition to thousands already guarding synagogues, mosques, schools and other sites around France. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
A man arrives at Republique square before the demonstration, in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani)
German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere hugs his French counterpart Bernard Cazeneuve, hidden behind, before the start of an international meeting aimed at fighting terrorism, in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Pens and candles are seen on the floor on January 11, 2015, as people gather for the start of a unity march in Paris, France. Huge crowds and some 40 world leaders are expected in Paris for a unity march after 17 people were killed during three days of deadly terror attacks. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: People gather for the start of a unity march in Paris, France on January 11, 2015 as French police take security measures in the city. Huge crowds and some 40 world leaders are expected in Paris for a unity march after 17 people were killed during three days of deadly terror attacks. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: French police officer stands guard on January 11, 2015, as people gather for the start of a unity march in Paris, France. Huge crowds and some 40 world leaders are expected in Paris for a unity march after 17 people were killed during three days of deadly terror attacks. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: People gather for the start of a unity march in Paris, France on January 11, 2015 as French police take security measures in the city. Huge crowds and some 40 world leaders are expected in Paris for a unity march after 17 people were killed during three days of deadly terror attacks. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
(Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: People gather for the start of a unity march in Paris, France on January 11, 2015 as French police take security measures in the city. Huge crowds and some 40 world leaders are expected in Paris for a unity march after 17 people were killed during three days of deadly terror attacks. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: French police stand guard on January 11, 2015, as people gather for the start of a unity march in Paris, France. Huge crowds and some 40 world leaders are expected in Paris for a unity march after 17 people were killed during three days of deadly terror attacks. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: French police soldier stands guard on January 11, 2015, as people gather for the start of a unity march in Paris, France. Huge crowds and some 40 world leaders are expected in Paris for a unity march after 17 people were killed during three days of deadly terror attacks. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
(Photo credit should read RAYMOND ROIG/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: French police officer stands guard on January 11, 2015, as people gather for the start of a unity march in Paris, France. Huge crowds and some 40 world leaders are expected in Paris for a unity march after 17 people were killed during three days of deadly terror attacks. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
(Photo credit should read BERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images)
(Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
(Photo credit should read RAYMOND ROIG/AFP/Getty Images)
(Photo credit should read RAYMOND ROIG/AFP/Getty Images)
(Photo credit should read RAYMOND ROIG/AFP/Getty Images)
People watch from their roof-top apartment as some thousands of people gather at Republique square in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. Thousands of people began filling France’s iconic Republique plaza, and world leaders converged on Paris in a rally of defiance and sorrow on Sunday to honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
A demonstrator holds up an oversized pencil at Republique Square, Paris, before the start of a demonstration, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani)
The crowd gather at Republique square in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. Thousands of people began filling France’s iconic Republique plaza, and world leaders converged on Paris in a rally of defiance and sorrow on Sunday to honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
People attend before a rally in Rennes, western France, on January 11, 2015, as tens of thousands of people stage rallies across France following four days of terror and twin siege dramas that claimed 17 victims, including the victims of the first attack by armed gunmen on the offices of French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7. AFP PHOTO / JEAN-FRANCOIS MONIER (Photo credit should read JEAN-FRANCOIS MONIER/AFP/Getty Images)
UMP right-wing party member Francois Baroin (3rdL), French Socialist Party (PS) first secretary Jean-Christophe Cambadelis (5thL), UMP right-wing party member Jean-Francois Cope (C), Roger Cukierman, President of the CRIF (Representative Council of France's Jewish Associations), former French employers union MEDEF president Laurence Parisot, Jean-Paul Huchon President of the Ile de France region, UMP right-wing party member Valerie Pecresse, the Mayor of Lille and Socialist Party member Martine Aubry, Hassen Chalghoumi, Imam of the northern Paris suburb of Drancy and president of the French Association of Imams, French writer Marek Halter, UMP right-wing party member Eric Woerth, Joel Mergui, president of the Central Jewish Consistory of France and the Rector of Paris' Mosque Dalil Boubakeur (front) take part in a Unity rally Marche Republicaine in Paris on January 11, 2015 in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. The killings began on January 7 with an assault on the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in Paris that saw two brothers massacre 12 people including some of the country's best-known cartoonists, the killing of a policewoman and the storming of a Jewish supermarket on the eastern fringes of the capital which killed 4 local residents. AFP PHOTO / THOMAS SAMSON (Photo credit should read THOMAS SAMSON/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: French President Francois Hollande (R) welcomes German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the Elysee Palace before attending a Unity rally in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. A mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images)
Demonstrators hold placards as they take part in a protest outside the Kizilay Square in Ankara on January 11, 2015 in tribute to the 12 people killed at terror attack on Charlie Hebdo offices in Paris. AFP PHOTO/ADEM ALTAN (Photo credit should read ADEM ALTAN/AFP/Getty Images)
German Chancellor Angela Merkel (2L), Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel (3L), British Prime Minister David Cameron (4L) leave the Elysee Palace before attending a Unity rally Marche Republicaine on January 11, 2015 in Paris in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. The killings began on January 7 with an assault on the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in Paris that saw two brothers massacre 12 people including some of the country's best-known cartoonists, the killing of a policewoman and the storming of a Jewish supermarket on the eastern fringes of the capital which killed 4 local residents. AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
(FromL) French Prime minister Manuel Valls, French President Francois Hollande, Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo, European Parliament President Martin Schulz, Senegal President Macky Sall and Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu leave the Elysee Palace before attending a Unity rally Marche Republicaine on January 11, 2015 in Paris in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. The killings began on January 7 with an assault on the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in Paris that saw two brothers massacre 12 people including some of the country's best-known cartoonists, the killing of a policewoman and the storming of a Jewish supermarket on the eastern fringes of the capital which killed 4 local residents. AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
People hold signs and the French flag as they gather at the Place de la Nation during the Unity rally Marche Republicaine on January 11, 2015 in Paris in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. The killings began on January 7 with an assault on the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in Paris that saw two brothers massacre 12 people including some of the country's best-known cartoonists, the killing of a policewoman and the storming of a Jewish supermarket on the eastern fringes of the capital which killed 4 local residents. AFP PHOTO / MARTIN BUREAU (Photo credit should read MARTIN BUREAU/AFP/Getty Images)
French President Francois Hollande (R) welcomes Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (L) at the Elysee Palace before attending a Unity rally Marche Republicaine on January 11, 2015 in Paris in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. The killings began on January 7 with an assault on the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in Paris that saw two brothers massacre 12 people including some of the country's best-known cartoonists, the killing of a policewoman and the storming of a Jewish supermarket on the eastern fringes of the capital which killed 4 local residents. AFP PHOTO / MATTHIEU ALEXANDRE (Photo credit should read MATTHIEU ALEXANDRE/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: People stand on a newsstand at 'Place de la Republique' during a unity rally in Paris led by French president Francois Hollande and other world leaders following the recent terrorist attacks, January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people converged in central Paris for the Unity March in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks which began on Wednesday, January 8, 2014 with an attack on French satarical magazine Charlie Hebdo and continued through Friday with attacks at a printing company and a Kosher supermarket. Three suspects were killed in seiges while a fourth, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Richard Bord/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Demonstrators make their way from 'Place de la Republique' to 'Place de la Nation' in a unity rally in Paris led by French president Francois Hollande and other world leaders following the recent terrorist attacks, January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people converged in central Paris for the Unity March in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks which began on Wednesday, January 8, 2014 with an attack on French satarical magazine Charlie Hebdo and continued through Friday with attacks at a printing company and a Kosher supermarket. Three suspects were killed in seiges while a fourth, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Richard Bord/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Demonstrators make their way from 'Place de la Republique' to 'Place de la Nation' in a unity rally in Paris led by French president Francois Hollande and other world leaders following the recent terrorist attacks, January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people converged in central Paris for the Unity March in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks which began on Wednesday, January 8, 2014 with an attack on French satarical magazine Charlie Hebdo and continued through Friday with attacks at a printing company and a Kosher supermarket. Three suspects were killed in seiges while a fourth, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Richard Bord/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Demonstrators make their way from 'Place de la Republique' to 'Place de la Nation' in a unity rally in Paris led by French president Francois Hollande and other world leaders following the recent terrorist attacks, January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people converged in central Paris for the Unity March in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks which began on Wednesday, January 8, 2014 with an attack on French satarical magazine Charlie Hebdo and continued through Friday with attacks at a printing company and a Kosher supermarket. Three suspects were killed in seiges while a fourth, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Richard Bord/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Demonstrators make their way from 'Place de la Republique' to 'Place de la Nation' in a unity rally in Paris led by French president Francois Hollande and other world leaders following the recent terrorist attacks, January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people converged in central Paris for the Unity March in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks which began on Wednesday, January 8, 2014 with an attack on French satarical magazine Charlie Hebdo and continued through Friday with attacks at a printing company and a Kosher supermarket. Three suspects were killed in seiges while a fourth, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Richard Bord/Getty Images)
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