Obama seeks laws on data hacking, student privacy

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Obama seeks laws on data hacking, student privacy
File- This Jan. 9, 2015, file photo shows President Barack Obama speaking about the France newspaper attack. President Obama wants Congress to pass legislation requiring companies to inform customers within 30 days if their data has been hacked. Obama will also propose a bill that would prevent companies from selling student data to third parties. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
US President Barack Obama speaks on new proposals for higher education accessibility at Pellissippi State Community College in Knoxville, Tennessee on January 9, 2015. AFP PHOTO/MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Barack Obama arrives on stage to speak on new proposals for higher education accessibility at Pellissippi State Community College in Knoxville, Tennessee on January 9, 2015. AFP PHOTO/MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Barack Obama makes his way to board Air Force One on January 9, 2015 at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland. Obama is heading to Tennessee to speak on new proposals for higher education accessibility. AFP PHOTO/MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US Vice President Joe Biden(L) shake hands with US President Barack Obama after introducing him at Pellissippi State Community College in Knoxville, Tennessee on January 9, 2015. AFP PHOTO/MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Barack Obama speaks about the attacks in France, saying 'the United States stands with you' at Pellissippi State Community College in Knoxville, Tennessee on January 9, 2015. AFP PHOTO/MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Barack Obama speaks about home purchases and refinancing at Central High School in Phoenix, Arizona, January 8, 2015. AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. Secret Service Director Mark Sullivan, left, and U.S. Attorney General Michael Mukasey, right, listen during a news conference, in Boston, Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2008. The Department of Justice announced Tuesday that it had charged 11 people in connection with the hacking of nine major U.S. retailers and the theft and sale of more than 40 million credit and debit card numbers. The retailers included TJX, BJ's Wholesale Club, OfficeMax, and Boston Market among others. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
FILE - In this Aug. 14, 2012 file photo, a customer walks toward a Home Depot in Nashville, Tenn. Home Depot on Monday, Sept. 8, 2014 confirmed that its payment systems have been hacked in a data breach that could affect millions of shoppers who used credit and debit cards at its more than 2,000 U.S. and Canadian stores. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, File)
FILE - In this Friday, Nov. 28, 2014 file photo, a shopper pays for her purchases at a Target store in South Portland, Maine. Criminals stole personal information from tens of millions of Americans in data breaches last year. Of those affected, one in three became victims of identity theft, according to research firm Javelin. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
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WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama wants Congress to pass legislation requiring companies to inform customers within 30 days if their data has been hacked, a move that follows high-profile breaches at retailers including Target, Home Depot and Neiman Marcus.

A White House official said Obama will announce the proposed legislation Monday, along with a measure aimed at preventing companies from selling student data to third parties and from using information collected in school to engage in targeted advertising.

Obama's proposals are part of a White House effort to preview components of the president's State of the Union address in the lead-up to the Jan. 20 speech. The official, who insisted on anonymity, was not authorized to discuss the proposed legislation by name ahead of Obama's speech at the Federal Trade Commission.

If passed by Congress, the Personal Data Notification and Protection Act could require U.S. companies to notify customers within 30 days of their personal information being compromised. Recent hackings have exposed the lack of uniform practices for alerting customers in the event of a breach.

The legislation would also make it a crime to sell customers' identities overseas.

Obama's proposals also follow last month's hacking at Sony Pictures Entertainment. The White House has blamed the cyber attack on North Korea and responded with new sanctions against the isolated nation.

In addition to the customer notification legislation, Obama will also ask lawmakers to pass the Student Digital Privacy Act. The measure would prohibit companies from selling student data to third parties, a move spurred by the increased use of technology in schools that can scoop up personal information.

The White House official said the proposed bill is based on a California statute.

It's unclear whether the new Republican-led Congress will take up either of Obama's legislative proposals.

Obama Urges Notification Rules for Hacked Companies
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