Kosher market attack deepens fears among European Jews

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Kosher market attack deepens fears among European Jews
FILE - This is a Friday, Jan. 9, 2015 file photo of a security officer directs released hostages after they stormed a kosher market to end a hostage situation, Paris. Explosions and gunshots were heard as police forces stormed a kosher grocery in Paris where a gunman was holding at least five people hostage. At the kosher supermarket in Paris, a quick-thinking Muslim employee hides several Jewish shoppers in the basement before sneaking out to brief police on the hostage-taker upstairs. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)
A hooded police officer crosses the closed ring road that circles Paris near a hostage-taking situation at a kosher market in Paris, Friday, Jan. 9, 2015. A police official said the man who has taken at least five people hostage in a kosher market in Paris appears linked to the newsroom massacre earlier this week that left 12 people dead. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Watched by the media a woman lays a flower tribute at the site of the attack on a kosher market in Paris, France, Saturday, Jan. 10, 2015. France's government urged the nation to remain vigilant Saturday, as thousands of security forces try to thwart any potential new attacks and hunt down a suspected accomplice in a rampage by terrorists linked to al-Qaida in Yemen that scarred the nation and left 20 dead. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani)
A security officer directs released hostages after they stormed a kosher market to end a hostage situation, Paris, Friday, Jan. 9, 2015. Explosions and gunshots were heard as police forces stormed a kosher grocery in Paris where a gunman was holding at least five people hostage. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 10: Bullet holes can be seen at the kosher market 'Hyper Cacher', which suffered a terrorist attack yesterday, on January 10, 2015 in Paris, France. Four hostages and three suspects were killed when police ended two separate sieges at a kosher supermarket and a printing company on an industrial estate, following Wednesday's deadly attack on 'Charlie Hebdo' french satirical magazine. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
Police officers detain youth who riding a scooter outside a hostage-taking situation at a kosher market in Paris, Friday Jan.9, 2015. France's anti-terrorism prosecutor says a shooting and hostage-taking attack is underway at a kosher market on the eastern edge of Paris. A police official said there are multiple hostages and wounded at the scene. It is not known if the two youths were involved in the hostage taking situation. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Security officers escort released hostages after they stormed a kosher market to end a hostage situation, Paris, Friday, Jan. 9, 2015. Explosions and gunshots were heard as police forces stormed a kosher grocery in Paris where a gunman was holding at least five people hostage. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)
Police officers detain youth who riding a scooter outside a hostage-taking situation at a kosher market in Paris, Friday Jan.9, 2015. France's anti-terrorism prosecutor says a shooting and hostage-taking attack is underway at a kosher market on the eastern edge of Paris. A police official said there are multiple hostages and wounded at the scene. It is not known if the two youths were involved in the hostage taking situation. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
A body is wheeled away from a kosher grocery store which was the scene of a hostage taking in Paris, Friday, Jan. 9, 2015. A Paris prosecutor said that gunman Amedy Coulibaly killed four people when he entered the kosher market in eastern Paris on Friday. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Hooded police officers cross the closed ring road that circles Paris near a hostage-taking situation at a kosher market in Paris, Friday Jan. 9, 2015. A police official says the man who has taken at least five people hostage in a kosher market in Paris appears linked to the newsroom massacre earlier this week that left 12 people dead. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Police officers take their positions near a hostage situation at a kosher market, in Paris, Friday Jan. 9, 2015. A police official says the man who has taken at least five people hostage in a kosher market on the eastern edges of Paris Friday appears linked to the newsroom massacre earlier this week that left 12 people dead. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
A police officer closes the bullet ridden door next to a body lying in the kosher market, in Paris, Friday Jan. 9, 2015. What started as a hunt for two terror suspects took on an even graver focus Friday as French police grappled with a potential terrorist cell. The suspects knew each other, had been linked to previous terrorist activities, and one had fought or trained with Al Qaida in Yemen. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Police officers prepare to remove a body lying outside the kosher market, in Paris, Friday Jan. 9, 2015. What started as a hunt for two terror suspects took on an even graver focus Friday as French police grappled with a potential terrorist cell. The suspects knew each other, had been linked to previous terrorist activities, and one had fought or trained with Al Qaida in Yemen. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Two police officers stand guard a day after a terrorist attack on a kosher market in Paris, France, Saturday, Jan. 10, 2015. France’s president chaired an emergency security meeting Saturday aimed at thwarting a repeat of the attacks around Paris by terrorists linked to al-Qaida in Yemen that scarred the nation and left 20 dead at a satirical newspaper, a kosher supermarket and a printing house. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
Security officers escort released hostages after they stormed a kosher market to end a hostage situation, Paris, Friday, Jan. 9, 2015. Explosions and gunshots were heard as police forces stormed a kosher grocery in Paris where a gunman was holding people hostage. Two sets of attackers seized hostages and locked down hundreds of French security forces around the capital on Friday, sending the city into fear and turmoil for a third day in a series of linked attacks that began with the deadly newspaper terror attack that left 12 people dead. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 10: A woman holds up a placard reading 'Je suis Yohan et je suis mort parceque je suis Juif' (I am Yohan and I'm dead because I'am Jewish) at the site of the attack on a kosher market on January 10, 2015 in Paris, France. Four hostages and three suspects were killed when police ended two separate sieges at a kosher supermarket and a printing company on an industrial estate, following Wednesday's deadly attack on Charlie Hebdo magazine. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Richard Bord/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 10: Tributes are displayed at the site of the attack on a kosher market on January 10, 2015 in Paris, France. Four hostages and three suspects were killed when police ended two separate sieges at a kosher supermarket and a printing company on an industrial estate, following Wednesday's deadly attack on Charlie Hebdo magazine. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Richard Bord/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 10: A jewish man prays as people light candles next to floral tributes at the site of the attack on a kosher market on January 10, 2015 in Paris, France. Four hostages and three suspects were killed when police ended two separate sieges at a kosher supermarket and a printing company on an industrial estate, following Wednesday's deadly attack on Charlie Hebdo magazine. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Richard Bord/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 10: Bullet holes can be seen at the kosher market 'Hyper Cacher', which suffered a terrorist attack yesterday, on January 10, 2015 in Paris, France. Four hostages and three suspects were killed when police ended two separate sieges at a kosher supermarket and a printing company on an industrial estate, following Wednesday's deadly attack on 'Charlie Hebdo' french satirical magazine. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 10: Police officers guard the kosher market 'Hyper Cacher', which suffered a terrorist attack yesterday, on January 10, 2015 in Paris, France. Four hostages and three suspects were killed when police ended two separate sieges at a kosher supermarket and a printing company on an industrial estate, following Wednesday's deadly attack on 'Charlie Hebdo' french satirical magazine. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Marc Piasecki/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 10: A man brings flower tributes to the site of the attack on a kosher market on January 10, 2015 in Paris, France. Four hostages and three suspects were killed when police ended two separate sieges at a kosher supermarket and a printing company on an industrial estate, following Wednesday's deadly attack on Charlie Hebdo magazine. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)
A forensic police officer works next to the bullet-riddled windows of the Hyper Casher kosher grocery store near Porte de Vincennes in eastern Paris on January 9, 2015 after police launched an assault killing the gunman holed up in the market and freeing the hostages. The gunman killed by police after taking hostages at a Jewish supermarket in Paris told BFMTV station he had 'co-ordinated' with the suspected Charlie Hebdo attackers and belonged to the Islamic State group. AFP PHOTO / ERIC FEFERBERG (Photo credit should read ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
Forensic police officers work inside the Hyper Casher kosher grocery store near Porte de Vincennes in eastern Paris on January 9, 2015 after police launched an assault killing the gunman holed up in the market and freeing the hostages. The gunman killed by police after taking hostages at a Jewish supermarket in Paris told BFMTV station he had 'co-ordinated' with the suspected Charlie Hebdo attackers and belonged to the Islamic State group. AFP PHOTO / ERIC FEFERBERG (Photo credit should read ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
Hooded police officers cross the closed ring road that circles Paris near a hostage-taking situation at a kosher market in Paris, Friday Jan.9, 2015. A police official says the man who has taken at least five people hostage in a kosher market in Paris appears linked to the newsroom massacre earlier this week that left 12 people dead. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Hooded police officers walk on the closed ring road that circles Paris near a hostage-taking situation at a kosher market in Paris, Friday Jan.9, 2015. A police official says the man who has taken at least five people hostage in a kosher market in Paris appears linked to the newsroom massacre earlier this week that left 12 people dead. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
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MILAN (AP) -- The killing of four French Jews in last week's hostage standoff at a Paris kosher market has deepened the fears among European Jewish communities shaken by rising anti-Semitism and feeling vulnerable due to poor security and a large number of potential soft targets.

In the wake of the attacks, which follow deadly strikes on a Belgian Jewish Museum and a Jewish school in southwestern France, Israeli leaders have called on European Jews to immigrate to the Jewish state. But European Jews are deeply ambivalent about leaving, and their community leaders, along with top politicians, have urged people to stay in their homelands.

"The European Jewry is the oldest European minority and we have our experience of surviving under all possible circumstances," Moshe Kantor, president of the European Jewish Congress, told The Associated Press. "We will not give up our motherland, which is called Europe. We will not stop the history of European Jewry, that is for sure."

'Jews Have A Place In France'

Kantor called for increased security at Jewish sites, concerted action against anti-Semitism across the continent and better coordination of intelligence forces against religious extremism. But he acknowledged that if any Jewish European does not feel safe, "I say you should leave in this case."

Many French Jews already are. Last year, 7,000 emigrated to Israel as anti-Semitism spiked across France, fed by tensions with the country's large Arab population after the outbreak of Israel's war against Palestinian militants in the Gaza Strip. That was double the previous year, making France, for the first time, the No. 1 source of immigration to Israel, according to the Jewish Agency, a nonprofit group that helps Jews move to Israel.

Officials in Israel are expecting - and encouraging - a new influx following the Paris standoff. Since last week's attacks, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has encouraged European Jews to move to the Jewish state.

In an interview with Israel's Channel 10 TV Saturday, Yohan Cohen, one of the hostages who hid inside a freezer at the kosher market for five hours during the hostage-taking, said he would now move his family of four children to Israel.

"On Monday I am going to make Aliyah," he said, using the Hebrew term for immigration to Israel. "We are not going to wait around here to die."

Overall, immigration was up 88 percent from Western Europe in 2014, with the arrival of 8,640 immigrants compared with some 4,600 in 2013, with surges also from Italy, Belgium and Britain, according to the Jewish Agency.

Experts say European Jews have not felt this threatened since World War II, when some 6 million Jews were murdered in the Nazi Holocaust. Researchers at Tel Aviv University monitoring anti-Semitism have reported a chilling increase in attacks in Europe over the past decade, including deadly shootings in Toulouse, France, in 2012 and Brussels last year. In recent years, France has had the highest number of incidents of any single country.

For many of Europe's 2 million Jews, the mood following the Paris attacks was one of tense vigilance amid increased security and additional personal precautions. Some were defiant and determined to remain. Others wondered whether their way of life can continue.

Heightened security measures, visible and non-visible, were swiftly enacted at Jewish places of worship, study and business across Europe over the weekend. Security officials and Jewish leaders in Italy, Britain, Poland, the Netherlands, Germany, and Austria confirmed increased surveillance of vulnerable sites without providing details.

Still, many Jews are taking their own precautions: An Israeli mother of three, who has been living in Berlin for several years, said she no longer allows her children to talk in Hebrew outside the home.

"When we are outside, I tell my kids to only speak English. I'm too afraid that somebody will recognize that we are Jewish or Israeli and then harm us," said the woman, who did not want to give her name out of fear.

Security at Rome's soaring Art Deco synagogue along the Tiber River was noticeably heightened during Friday evening prayers. In the predominantly Jewish north London neighborhoods of Golders Green and Temple Fortune, police vans drove by frequently Sunday, while members of the Community Security Trust - a charity established to combat threats to the Jewish community - patrolled on foot.

Rivki Rokach, a manager at Kosher Kingdom supermarket, said management was putting into place new security measures, declining to specify. She said business had not dropped off since the attacks.

"People are in a bit of panic mode, but thank God people need to shop," she said. "We are doing everything we can to make sure people are comfortable."

A spokesman for the Jewish community in Rome, one of the oldest Jewish communities in the world, noted that security has long been tight. Metal barricades and other cement planters keep passers-by and cars from getting close to the main synagogue, and Italian police officers with automatic weapons stand guard in sentry boxes day and night. An attack by a Palestinian terrorist on the main Rome synagogue claimed the life of a toddler in 1982.

Even with the high security, "the members of our community are living through this moment with greater apprehension," said Fabio Perugia, the spokesman.

In Milan, Jewish community leader Walker Meghnagi welcomed the government's deployment of additional security.

"I can't say we are tranquil. What they are doing is the best that they can give," Meghnagi said.

Netanyahu's calls for immigration have not been entirely welcomed. In France, home to the world's third-largest Jewish community, political leaders stressed that Jews are an integral part of the French Republic, having gained citizenship during the French Revolution.

"France, without the Jews of France, is not France anymore," Prime Minister Manuel Valls said.

Haim Korsia, the chief rabbi of France, emphasized Jews' 2,000-year history in France in comments to iTele.

"We dream in French, we think in French, our culture is French, our language is French," he said. "Obviously France is our country."

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France, Paris rally anti-terrorism 2015
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Kosher market attack deepens fears among European Jews
This photo shows a page in the ultra-Orthodox HaMevaser newspaper, containing a manipulated photo of world leaders marching in Paris, France on Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015, digitally omitting German Chancellor Angela Merkel. The small Jewish newspaper in Israel is making waves internationally for removing Merkel from a photo of last week's Paris march out of modesty. HaMevaser readers could not know that, however, as her picture was digitally removed, leaving Abbas standing next to Hollande. Israeli media joked it was meant to bring Abbas closer to Israeli premier Benjamin Netanyahu, who was standing nearby. (AP Photo/HaMevaser Newspaper)
From the left, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, former French President Nicolas Sarkozy, Malian President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita, French President Francois Hollande, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, EU president Donald Tusk and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas march during a rally in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Philippe Wojazer, Pool)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A memorial is seen near the Charlie Hebdo offices during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A memorial is seen near the Charlie Hebdo offices during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A memorial is seen near the Charlie Hebdo offices during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A memorial is seen near the Charlie Hebdo offices during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A memorial is seen near the Charlie Hebdo offices during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A memorial is seen near the Charlie Hebdo offices during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
A man holds up a placard that reads "I am Charlie" at the Place de la Nation in Paris Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. More than 40 world leaders, their arms linked, marched through Paris Sunday to rally for unity and freedom of expression and to honor 17 victims of three days of terrorist attacks. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)
A girl holds up a placard that reads "I am Charlie" in several languages at the Place de la Nation in Paris Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. More than 40 world leaders, their arms linked, marched through Paris Sunday to rally for unity and freedom of expression and to honor 17 victims of three days of terrorist attacks. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)
Signs hang at the French Alliance community center in solidarity with the victims of recent attacks in France, in Quito, Ecuador, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. People gathered to honor the victims of the shootings at the Paris satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo and a kosher supermarket in France. Demonstrations were held Sunday in cities around France and around the world. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)
A woman holds a sign that reads in French "I am Charlie" during a gathering in solidarity with the victims of recent attacks in France at the French Alliance community center in Quito, Ecuador, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. People gathered to honor the victims of the shootings at the Paris satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo and a kosher supermarket in France. Demonstrations were held Sunday in cities around France and around the world. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)
People wave national flags and hold placards that read "I am Charlie" at the Place de la Nation in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. More than 40 world leaders, their arms linked, marched through Paris Sunday to rally for unity and freedom of expression and to honor 17 victims of three days of terrorist attacks. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)
French expatriates David Nalmin, right, Gabriel Giraldi, and American Patty Rasmussen carry a French flag during a silent walk through Piedmont Park in Atlanta, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015, to support France after a three-day terrorism spree around Paris that killed 17 people last week. (AP Photo/John Amis)
The crowd march in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. Hundreds of thousands of people marched through Paris on Sunday in a massive show of unity and defiance in the face of terrorism that killed 17 people in France's bleakest moment in half a century. Banner reads: Press is Charlie. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani)
Israelis, mostly French Jews, light candles as the names of the victims are placed during a gathering to pay tribute to victims of the attack on the kosher supermarket in Paris where four hostages were killed on Friday, in Netanya, Israel, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)
People start gathering at Republique square before the demonstration, in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani)
Joel Mergui, left, president of the French Jewish Consistory, Roger Cukierman, center, President of the Representative Council of France's Jewish Associations (CRIF) and Sacha Reingewirtz, head of the Jewish Students of France, answer reporters after a meeting with French President Francois Hollande at the Elysee Palace in Paris, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/David Azia)
Children and adults start gathering at Republique square before the demonstration, in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani)
French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve, left, welcomes Britain's Interior Minister Theresa May before the start of an international meeting aimed at fighting terrorism, in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
U.S Attorney General Eric Holder, left, is welcomed by French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve before the start of an international meeting aimed at fighting terrorism, in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
Belgian Interior Minister Jan Jambon, left, is welcomed by French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve before the start of an international meeting aimed at fighting terrorism, in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
Members of the Union of French Jewish place candles during a demonstration outside a kosher grocery store where four hostages were killed on Friday in Paris, Saturday, Jan. 10, 2015. Hundreds of thousands of people marched Saturday in cities from Toulouse in the south to Rennes in the west to honor the victims, and Paris expects hundreds of thousands more at Sunday’s unity rally. More than 2,000 police are being deployed, in addition to thousands already guarding synagogues, mosques, schools and other sites around France. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
Laura Dugué, originally of Toulouse, France, symbolically holds a pen in the air as several hundred people gather in solidarity with victims of two terrorist attacks in Paris, one at the office of weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo and another at a kosher market, in New York's Washington Square Park, Saturday, Jan. 10, 2015. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)
French Prime Minister Manuel Valls, left, waves to the public as he enters in his car during a demonstration organized by members of the Union of French Jewish students outside a kosher grocery store where four hostages were killed on Friday in Paris, Saturday, Jan. 10, 2015. Hundreds of thousands of people marched Saturday in cities from Toulouse in the south to Rennes in the west to honor the victims, and Paris expects hundreds of thousands more at Sunday’s unity rally. More than 2,000 police are being deployed, in addition to thousands already guarding synagogues, mosques, schools and other sites around France. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
A man arrives at Republique square before the demonstration, in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani)
German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere hugs his French counterpart Bernard Cazeneuve, hidden behind, before the start of an international meeting aimed at fighting terrorism, in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Pens and candles are seen on the floor on January 11, 2015, as people gather for the start of a unity march in Paris, France. Huge crowds and some 40 world leaders are expected in Paris for a unity march after 17 people were killed during three days of deadly terror attacks. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: People gather for the start of a unity march in Paris, France on January 11, 2015 as French police take security measures in the city. Huge crowds and some 40 world leaders are expected in Paris for a unity march after 17 people were killed during three days of deadly terror attacks. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: French police officer stands guard on January 11, 2015, as people gather for the start of a unity march in Paris, France. Huge crowds and some 40 world leaders are expected in Paris for a unity march after 17 people were killed during three days of deadly terror attacks. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: People gather for the start of a unity march in Paris, France on January 11, 2015 as French police take security measures in the city. Huge crowds and some 40 world leaders are expected in Paris for a unity march after 17 people were killed during three days of deadly terror attacks. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
(Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: People gather for the start of a unity march in Paris, France on January 11, 2015 as French police take security measures in the city. Huge crowds and some 40 world leaders are expected in Paris for a unity march after 17 people were killed during three days of deadly terror attacks. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: French police stand guard on January 11, 2015, as people gather for the start of a unity march in Paris, France. Huge crowds and some 40 world leaders are expected in Paris for a unity march after 17 people were killed during three days of deadly terror attacks. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: French police soldier stands guard on January 11, 2015, as people gather for the start of a unity march in Paris, France. Huge crowds and some 40 world leaders are expected in Paris for a unity march after 17 people were killed during three days of deadly terror attacks. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
(Photo credit should read RAYMOND ROIG/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: French police officer stands guard on January 11, 2015, as people gather for the start of a unity march in Paris, France. Huge crowds and some 40 world leaders are expected in Paris for a unity march after 17 people were killed during three days of deadly terror attacks. (Photo by Dursun Aydemir/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
(Photo credit should read BERTRAND GUAY/AFP/Getty Images)
(Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
(Photo credit should read RAYMOND ROIG/AFP/Getty Images)
(Photo credit should read RAYMOND ROIG/AFP/Getty Images)
(Photo credit should read RAYMOND ROIG/AFP/Getty Images)
People watch from their roof-top apartment as some thousands of people gather at Republique square in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. Thousands of people began filling France’s iconic Republique plaza, and world leaders converged on Paris in a rally of defiance and sorrow on Sunday to honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
A demonstrator holds up an oversized pencil at Republique Square, Paris, before the start of a demonstration, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. A rally of defiance and sorrow, protected by an unparalleled level of security, on Sunday will honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed in Paris that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani)
The crowd gather at Republique square in Paris, France, Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. Thousands of people began filling France’s iconic Republique plaza, and world leaders converged on Paris in a rally of defiance and sorrow on Sunday to honor the 17 victims of three days of bloodshed that left France on alert for more violence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
People attend before a rally in Rennes, western France, on January 11, 2015, as tens of thousands of people stage rallies across France following four days of terror and twin siege dramas that claimed 17 victims, including the victims of the first attack by armed gunmen on the offices of French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris on January 7. AFP PHOTO / JEAN-FRANCOIS MONIER (Photo credit should read JEAN-FRANCOIS MONIER/AFP/Getty Images)
UMP right-wing party member Francois Baroin (3rdL), French Socialist Party (PS) first secretary Jean-Christophe Cambadelis (5thL), UMP right-wing party member Jean-Francois Cope (C), Roger Cukierman, President of the CRIF (Representative Council of France's Jewish Associations), former French employers union MEDEF president Laurence Parisot, Jean-Paul Huchon President of the Ile de France region, UMP right-wing party member Valerie Pecresse, the Mayor of Lille and Socialist Party member Martine Aubry, Hassen Chalghoumi, Imam of the northern Paris suburb of Drancy and president of the French Association of Imams, French writer Marek Halter, UMP right-wing party member Eric Woerth, Joel Mergui, president of the Central Jewish Consistory of France and the Rector of Paris' Mosque Dalil Boubakeur (front) take part in a Unity rally Marche Republicaine in Paris on January 11, 2015 in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. The killings began on January 7 with an assault on the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in Paris that saw two brothers massacre 12 people including some of the country's best-known cartoonists, the killing of a policewoman and the storming of a Jewish supermarket on the eastern fringes of the capital which killed 4 local residents. AFP PHOTO / THOMAS SAMSON (Photo credit should read THOMAS SAMSON/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: French President Francois Hollande (R) welcomes German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the Elysee Palace before attending a Unity rally in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. A mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images)
Demonstrators hold placards as they take part in a protest outside the Kizilay Square in Ankara on January 11, 2015 in tribute to the 12 people killed at terror attack on Charlie Hebdo offices in Paris. AFP PHOTO/ADEM ALTAN (Photo credit should read ADEM ALTAN/AFP/Getty Images)
German Chancellor Angela Merkel (2L), Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel (3L), British Prime Minister David Cameron (4L) leave the Elysee Palace before attending a Unity rally Marche Republicaine on January 11, 2015 in Paris in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. The killings began on January 7 with an assault on the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in Paris that saw two brothers massacre 12 people including some of the country's best-known cartoonists, the killing of a policewoman and the storming of a Jewish supermarket on the eastern fringes of the capital which killed 4 local residents. AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
(FromL) French Prime minister Manuel Valls, French President Francois Hollande, Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo, European Parliament President Martin Schulz, Senegal President Macky Sall and Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu leave the Elysee Palace before attending a Unity rally Marche Republicaine on January 11, 2015 in Paris in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. The killings began on January 7 with an assault on the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in Paris that saw two brothers massacre 12 people including some of the country's best-known cartoonists, the killing of a policewoman and the storming of a Jewish supermarket on the eastern fringes of the capital which killed 4 local residents. AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
People hold signs and the French flag as they gather at the Place de la Nation during the Unity rally Marche Republicaine on January 11, 2015 in Paris in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. The killings began on January 7 with an assault on the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in Paris that saw two brothers massacre 12 people including some of the country's best-known cartoonists, the killing of a policewoman and the storming of a Jewish supermarket on the eastern fringes of the capital which killed 4 local residents. AFP PHOTO / MARTIN BUREAU (Photo credit should read MARTIN BUREAU/AFP/Getty Images)
French President Francois Hollande (R) welcomes Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (L) at the Elysee Palace before attending a Unity rally Marche Republicaine on January 11, 2015 in Paris in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. The killings began on January 7 with an assault on the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in Paris that saw two brothers massacre 12 people including some of the country's best-known cartoonists, the killing of a policewoman and the storming of a Jewish supermarket on the eastern fringes of the capital which killed 4 local residents. AFP PHOTO / MATTHIEU ALEXANDRE (Photo credit should read MATTHIEU ALEXANDRE/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A general view of Place de la Republique during the mass unity rally on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people have converged in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. President Francois Hollande of France led the march and was joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist acts started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Aurelien Meunier/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: People stand on a newsstand at 'Place de la Republique' during a unity rally in Paris led by French president Francois Hollande and other world leaders following the recent terrorist attacks, January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people converged in central Paris for the Unity March in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks which began on Wednesday, January 8, 2014 with an attack on French satarical magazine Charlie Hebdo and continued through Friday with attacks at a printing company and a Kosher supermarket. Three suspects were killed in seiges while a fourth, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Richard Bord/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Demonstrators make their way from 'Place de la Republique' to 'Place de la Nation' in a unity rally in Paris led by French president Francois Hollande and other world leaders following the recent terrorist attacks, January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people converged in central Paris for the Unity March in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks which began on Wednesday, January 8, 2014 with an attack on French satarical magazine Charlie Hebdo and continued through Friday with attacks at a printing company and a Kosher supermarket. Three suspects were killed in seiges while a fourth, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Richard Bord/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Demonstrators make their way from 'Place de la Republique' to 'Place de la Nation' in a unity rally in Paris led by French president Francois Hollande and other world leaders following the recent terrorist attacks, January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people converged in central Paris for the Unity March in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks which began on Wednesday, January 8, 2014 with an attack on French satarical magazine Charlie Hebdo and continued through Friday with attacks at a printing company and a Kosher supermarket. Three suspects were killed in seiges while a fourth, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Richard Bord/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Demonstrators make their way from 'Place de la Republique' to 'Place de la Nation' in a unity rally in Paris led by French president Francois Hollande and other world leaders following the recent terrorist attacks, January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people converged in central Paris for the Unity March in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks which began on Wednesday, January 8, 2014 with an attack on French satarical magazine Charlie Hebdo and continued through Friday with attacks at a printing company and a Kosher supermarket. Three suspects were killed in seiges while a fourth, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Richard Bord/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Demonstrators make their way from 'Place de la Republique' to 'Place de la Nation' in a unity rally in Paris led by French president Francois Hollande and other world leaders following the recent terrorist attacks, January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people converged in central Paris for the Unity March in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks which began on Wednesday, January 8, 2014 with an attack on French satarical magazine Charlie Hebdo and continued through Friday with attacks at a printing company and a Kosher supermarket. Three suspects were killed in seiges while a fourth, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Richard Bord/Getty Images)
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