Controversial contact lenses come with a warning

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Dangerous New Beauty Trend May Leave You Blind

A controversial new fashion trend may be blinding... literally.

As Japanese Anime continues to become more popular, some fans of the artform want their own anime-style eyes. Circle lenses, new contacts imported from Asia, give the illusion that wearers irises are larger than they really are, but the look comes with a heavy risk.

Sites like PinkyPalace.com sell the lenses in a wide variety of colors including yellow, red, and white -- however, you don't need a prescription.

The chairman of the contact lens and cornea section of the American Optometric Association told the Daily Mail that ill-fitting contacts can deprive the eye of oxygen and cause serious damage, and back in 2010, a spokesperson from the FDA told the New York Times they could lead to blindness.

Even the Pinky Palace website offers a warning to buyers. The site says, "Circle lenses are generally safe and are approved by Korean FDA. But precaution is always needed."

The big eye look became a trend in asia in the last few years, and started to get popular here in the U.S. after Lady Gaga's "Bad Romance" music video featured the singer with digitally altered eyes. Lady Gaga also wore a dress made of meat, luckily that didn't catch on.

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Controversial contact lenses come with a warning
A fan of "cosplay" dressed up as her favorite anime character poses during the Cosplay, Comics, Anime & Games Exhibition (C2AGE) at a shopping mall in Petaling Jaya, near Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Saturday, July 17, 2010. The exhibition aims to introduce the enticing world of Japanese animation, American comics and those with the passion for gaming to youth and the public. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)
A fan of "cosplay" dressed up as her favorite anime character poses during the Cosplay, Comics, Anime & Games Exhibition (C2AGE) at a shopping mall in Petaling Jaya, near Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Saturday, July 17, 2010. The exhibition aims to introduce the enticing world of Japanese animation, American comics and those with the passion for gaming to youth and the public. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)
A young Taiwanese woman wears red contact lenses for a dramatic effect during a cosplay convention, Saturday, Feb. 24, 2007, in Taipei, Taiwan. Cosplay, a combination of the English words "costume" and "play", is a Japanese subculture centered on dressing as characters from manga (Japanese comics), anime, video games, and fantasy movies. Cosplay is gaining popularity in Taiwan where younger generations are very fond of Japanese culture, fashion and food. (AP Photo)
A participant dresses as Japanese animation character during a costume competition in Hong Kong Sunday July 30, 2006. The craze for "costume play", or "cosplay", is the latest trend hitting Hong Kong's teenagers, who are already immersed in a pervasive culture growing out of Japanese anime and gaming.(AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
Cosplay
Karrie Shirou, dressed as "Etna," right, and Bryan Yang, in his "Haku" outfit, pose for portraits in a park in Santa Monica, Calif., Wednesday, June 29, 2011. Both will join some 100,000 other aficionados at the Anime Expo, the distinctive Japanese animation style, and many will come dressed as intergalactic ninja crime fighters, bug-eyed vampires, spiky-haired space cowboys, goth princesses and the like, at the Los Angeles Convention Center beginning Friday, July 1. What will follow will be four days of karaoke singing, dancing, movie watching, souvenir buying, autograph collecting and learning about the latest hot anime thing. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)
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