Where is Santa? Find him now with help from NORAD's Santa Tracker

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Where is Santa? Find him now with help from NORAD's Santa Tracker
It’s that time again — Santa spends all year watching little boys and girls but for one night the tables are turned, thanks to NORAD Santa Tracker.
This image provided by NASA shows the original 1955 advertisement that started the tradition of the North American Aerospace Defense Command tracking Santa. NORAD's holiday tradition can by traced to 1955, when a Colorado Springs newspaper printed a Sears Roebuck ad telling children of a phone number to talk to Santa. The number for the "Santa hot line" was one digit off, and instead the first child to get through got the Continental Air Defense Command, NORAD's predecessor. (AP Photo/NASA)
FILE - In this Dec. 24, 2010 file image provided by noradsanta.org, the official NORAD tracking of Santa Claus is shown on a satellite map of the world. NORAD Tracks Santa, the official name of the exercise, began in 1955 when a Colorado Springs newspaper ad invited kids to talk to Santa on a hotline. The phone number had a typo, and dozens of kids wound up dialing the Continental Aerospace Defense Command in Colorado Springs, the predecessor to NORAD. Volunteer Santa-trackers at NORAD are bracing for tens of thousands of calls and emails on Christmas Eve this year. (AP Photo/NORAD, via noradsanta.org)
FILE - In this Dec. 24, 2012 file photo, NORAD Deputy Commander Lt. General Alain Parent, center, of the Royal Canadian Air Force, takes phone calls from children asking where Santa is and when he will deliver presents to their house, during the annual NORAD Tracks Santa Operation, at the North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD, at Peterson Air Force Base, in Colorado Springs, Colo. Also fielding calls are U.S. Navy Capt. Jeff Davis, left, and U.S. Air Force Maj. Chris Bendig. The U.S. and Canadian military will entertain millions of kids again this Christmas Eve with second-by-second updates on Santa’s global whereabouts.(AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 24, 2012 file photo, volunteer Katherine Beaupre takes phone calls from children asking where Santa is and when he will deliver presents to their house,during the annual NORAD Tracks Santa Operation, at the North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD, at Peterson Air Force Base, in Colorado Springs, Colo. The U.S. and Canadian military will entertain millions of kids again this Christmas Eve with second-by-second updates on Santa’s global whereabouts. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 24, 2012 file photo, Lizzie Solano, center, and her sister Sarah take phone calls from children asking where Santa is and when he will deliver presents to their house, during the annual NORAD Tracks Santa Operation, at the North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD, at Peterson Air Force Base, in Colorado Springs, Colo. The U.S. and Canadian military will entertain millions of kids again this Christmas Eve with second-by-second updates on Santa’s global whereabouts. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)
FILE - In this Monday, Dec. 24, 2012 file photo, U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. Richard Scobie, right, his son Andrew, center, and wife Janis, all take phone calls from children asking where Santa is and when he will deliver presents to their house, during the annual NORAD Tracks Santa Operation, at the North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD, at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado Springs, Colo. NORAD said Friday, Dec. 28, it drew a record number of phone calls and social media followers during its NORAD Tracks Santa operation on Christmas Eve. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)
Volunteers take phone calls and answer emails at the Santa Tracking Operations Center at Peterson Air Force Base near Colorado Springs, Colo., on Friday, Dec. 24, 2010. Lots of military secrets are hidden behind the gleaming walls of NORAD'S headquarters building, including this one: Just how do they get Santa's flight path onto their computer screens every Christmas Eve? Tracking Santa's travels is a celebrated tradition at the North American Aerospace Command, and it unfolds Friday for the 55th year. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)
FILE - In this Dec. 24, 2010 file photo, Air Force Lt. Col. David Hanson, of Chicago, takes a phone call from a child in Florida at the Santa Tracking Operations Center at Peterson Air Force Base near Colorado Springs, Colo. Santa is already piling up monster numbers on social networking sites this season, so the volunteer Santa-trackers at NORAD are bracing for tens of thousands of calls and emails when their operations center goes live on Christmas Eve. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)
U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. Richard Scobie talks with a fellow volunteer while taking phone calls from children asking where Santa is and when he will deliver presents to their house, during the annual NORAD Tracks Santa Operation, at the North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD, at Peterson Air Force Base, in Colorado Springs, Colo., Monday Dec. 24, 2012. Over a thousand volunteers at NORAD handle more than 100,000 thousand phone calls from children around the world every Christmas Eve, with NORAD continually projecting Santa's supposed progress delivering presents. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)
Volunteer Kim Watson talks with a youngster asking about Santa's whereabouts at the Santa Tracking Operations Center at Peterson Air Force Base near Colorado Springs, Colo., on Friday, Dec. 24, 2010. Lots of military secrets are hidden behind the gleaming walls of NORAD'S headquarters building, including this one: Just how do they get Santa's flight path onto their computer screens every Christmas Eve. Tracking Santa's travels is a celebrated tradition at the North American Aerospace Command, and it unfolds Friday for the 55th year. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)
Volunteer Ken Peck listens to question from a youngster about Santa at the Santa Tracking Operations Center at Peterson Air Force Base near Colorado Springs, Colo., on Friday, Dec. 24, 2010. Lots of military secrets are hidden behind the gleaming walls of NORAD'S headquarters building, including this one: Just how do they get Santa's flight path onto their computer screens every Christmas Eve? Tracking Santa's travels is a celebrated tradition at the North American Aerospace Command, and it unfolds Friday for the 55th year. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)
Air Force Lt. Col. David Hanson, of Chicago, takes a phone call from a youngster in Florida at the Santa Tracking Operations Center at Peterson Air Force Base near Colorado Springs, Colo., on Friday, Dec. 24, 2010. Volunteers take as many as 80,000 phone calls from youngsters and adults around the world with questions about Santa and his travels. Lots of military secrets are hidden behind the gleaming walls of NORAD'S headquarters building, including this one: Just how do they get Santa's flight path onto their computer screens every Christmas Eve?Tracking Santa's travels is a celebrated tradition at the North American Aerospace Command, and it unfolds Friday for the 55th year. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)
FILE - In this Dec. 24, 2010 file photo, volunteers take phone calls and answer emails at the Santa Tracking Operations Center at Peterson Air Force Base near Colorado Springs, Colo. Santa is already piling up monster numbers on social networking sites this season, so the volunteer Santa-trackers at NORAD are bracing for tens of thousands of calls and emails when their operations center goes live on Christmas Eve. (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski, File)
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Santa is on the move, delivering Christmas presents to kids around the globe, but where is he?

Fortunately, the friendly folks at NORAD are keeping close tabs on him, and have been since 1955. The tracker goes live early Christmas Eve morning, as Santa begins his travels on the other side of the world.



If you'd rather call to find out where Santa is, the NORAD Tracks Santa Operations Center is fully operational beginning at 3:00a.m. MST on December 24th. You can call 1 877 HI-NORAD (1 877 446-6723) to talk directly to a NORAD staff member who will be able to tell you Santa's exact location.

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