Mobolaji Akiode's passion ignites her purpose for African female athletes

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By KAYLA LOMBARDO
College Contributor Network

Mobolaji Akiode is the type of passionate individual who makes others better by her very presence alone. The sort whose palpable aura of determination is understood just through hearing her speak. Yet, it has been a combination of Akiode's unrelenting passion for success and commanding presence that has created a life full of purpose both on the basketball court during her time as a star player at the Division I and international levels, and with the non-profit organization she started in 2010 called Hope 4 Girls.

"I can remember during her freshman year (at Fordham University), the team was down by two points against Marist with one second left and Mobo was at the line for two shots," recalled Eric Sanders, Akiode's academic adviser at Fordham. "She made the first, but missed the second, then took off right for the bus crying because she thought it was her fault that the team lost the game. She was that kind of passionate leader."

That fiery spirit is the reason, in part, why the 32-year-old American-born Nigerian found herself on espnW's inaugural Impact 25 list of the most impactful people for women's sports in 2014.

Akiode, a 2004 Olympian and former co-captain of the Nigerian women's national basketball team, was stunned to see her name among those of women's sports trailblazers like Serena Williams, Becky Hammon, Mo'ne Davis, Robin Roberts, and even First Lady Michelle Obama.

"To be on the same list as people who are all superstars in their own right is just amazing," the 2004 graduate of Fordham University said. "It's such an honor for me, especially because my work doesn't deal with sports here in America. I don't know if I'll ever be on the same list as Michelle Obama again."

Don't let Akiode's humility and unassuming nature fool you about the tremendous impact she has made for African females, however. Akiode's organization is based in both America and Nigeria and is dedicated to the increased participation and empowerment of young and disadvantaged African women in basketball. Her groundbreaking work as the founder and executive director of Hope 4 Girls has made her a spearheading leader for international women's sports initiatives.



Following her three-year stint with the Nigerian women's national basketball team after college, Akiode worked as an accountant for ESPN in Bristol, CT until 2009. It was then that she felt motivated to start Hope 4 Girls, in order to serve others on a larger scale.

"When I was working at ESPN, I had the opportunity to do community service," Akiode recollected. "It made me think about Nigeria and what it's like to grow up as a girl there and I just felt compelled to act. So, I decided to jump two feet in with Hope 4 Girls, and here we are now."

Since 2010, Hope 4 Girls has created a gateway to basketball for young African women through a series of camps and clinics run by Akiode throughout the calendar year. At each Hope 4 Girls event, the messages delivered to participants go far beyond basketball instruction. Akiode and her staff work to mentor girls about the need for education, health, wellness, and social awareness in today's global society.

"The mentoring is the most gratifying thing about Hope 4 Girls," Akiode said. "I have a great time playing big sister, both as a disciplinarian and voice of reason."

Akiode's work has extended beyond the confines of the African continent and stretched into the American college basketball landscape. To date, Hope 4 Girls has helped six African girls land basketball scholarships through its fundraising and recruiting efforts, including Division I offers to Virginia Tech, Texas, Northwestern, and Butler.




As a standout during her own college career, Akiode was an All-Atlantic 10 Conference performer who finished her run with the Rams ranked in Fordham's top 10 all-time in scoring and rebounding with 1,167 points and 554 rebounds, respectively. She was inducted into the Fordham Athletics Hall of Fame last January.

Aside from basketball, however, Akiode knows the value of a great education in an enriching environment. The Gabelli School of Business graduate developed her talents and found her voice while at Fordham.

"I really blossomed during my time at Fordham, and not just athletically and academically, but also personally and emotionally, learning that I could be anything that I wanted to be," Akiode stated. "It was a great foundation that prepared me for the global life that I live now."

The self-discovery that Akiode experienced as a student-athlete at Fordham is what motivates her to help other African girls find themselves through basketball.

"The girls in Africa don't know what the possibilities for their lives can be through sports, and that's something I want to continue to expose to them," Akiode said. "I want to show girls that they can be leaders in whatever they choose to do."




Although the recognition she received from espnW serves as a delightful reminder that she is living her purpose and aiding in the progress of African female athletes, Akiode is far from satisfied with her efforts.

"Working towards building a concession of role models in the continent of Africa that young girls can look up to is what motivates me on a daily basis," Akiode revealed. "I never wake up feeling satisfied."

While Hope 4 Girls has made great progress for young African women in basketball, plenty of barriers still exist for females interested in sports within the turmoil-ridden continent. And due to the absence of sports for girls in most African schools and a general discouragement of female participation in sports in Africa, Akiode believes it will take an aggressive effort by women across the world to create meaningful and lasting global changes.

"I think that we women need to have somewhat of a chip on our shoulders that says we haven't come far enough, and we're not just going to relax because we've made some progress," Akiode stated. "We can do more, and if we continue to work and fight like we haven't achieved that much, then I think we will continue to break more barriers."

As long as Mobolaji Akiode and other impactful trailblazers are leading the charge for women in sports both in America and abroad, you can bet an unparalleled amount of passion and purpose will be on full display, and continue to make females eager to tackle any obstacles standing in their way.


Kayla Lombardo is a senior at Fordham University. She plays third base for Fordham's softball team and is a passionate New York Yankees fan. Follow her on Twitter: @KaylaLombardo11

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