Pakistan's most hated man: volleyball player, child killer

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

23 PHOTOS
Peshawar school massacre
See Gallery
Pakistan's most hated man: volleyball player, child killer
Bullet holes are seen in the wall at an army-run school a day after an attack by Taliban militants in Peshawar on December 17, 2014. Pakistan began three days of mourning on December 17 for the 132 schoolchildren and nine staff killed by the Taliban in the country's deadliest ever terror attack as the world united in a chorus of revulsion. The 141 people were killed when insurgents stormed an army-run school in the northwestern city of Peshawar and systematically went from room to room shooting children during an eight-hour killing spree. AFP PHOTO / A MAJEED (Photo credit should read A Majeed/AFP/Getty Images)
A Pakistani journalist films inside the Army Public School attacked the day before by Taliban gunmen in Peshawar, Pakistan, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014. Pakistan mourned as the nation prepares for mass funerals Wednesday for over 140 people, most of them children, killed in the Taliban massacre in the military-run school in the country's northwest in the deadliest and most horrific attacks in years, officials said. (AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad)
A Pakistan army soldier inspects the Army Public School attacked the day before by Taliban gunmen in Peshawar, Pakistan, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014. Pakistan mourned as the nation prepares for mass funerals Wednesday for over 140 people, most of them children, killed in the Taliban massacre in the military-run school in the country's northwest in the deadliest and most horrific attacks in years, officials said. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)
A Pakistani soldier walks out of the Army Public School that was attacked the day before by Taliban gunmen in Peshawar, Pakistan, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014. Pakistan mourned as the nation prepares for mass funerals Wednesday for over 140 people, most of them children, killed in the Taliban massacre in the military-run school in the country's northwest in the deadliest and most horrific attacks in years, officials said. (AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad)
Pakistani soldiers inspect inside the Army Public School attacked the day before by Taliban gunmen, in Peshawar, Pakistan, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014. Pakistan mourned as the nation prepares for mass funerals Wednesday for over 140 people, most of them children, killed in the Taliban massacre in a military-run school in the country’s northwest in the deadliest and most horrific attacks in years, officials said. (AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad)
A Pakistani photographer takes pictures in principal's room at the Army Public School attacked the day before by Taliban gunmen, in Peshawar, Pakistan, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014. Pakistan mourned as the nation prepares for mass funerals Wednesday for over 140 people, most of them children, killed in the Taliban massacre in a military-run school in the country’s northwest in the deadliest and most horrific attacks in years, officials said. (AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad)
Journalists visit the Army Public School attacked the day before by Taliban gunmen, in Peshawar, Pakistan, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014. Pakistan mourned as the nation prepares for mass funerals Wednesday for over 140 people, most of them children, killed in the Taliban massacre in a military-run school in the country’s northwest in the deadliest and most horrific attacks in years, officials said. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)
Pakistani video journalists film inside the auditorium of an Army Public School a day after an attack by the Taliban, in Peshawar, Pakistan, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014. Pakistan mourned as the nation prepares for mass funerals Wednesday for over 140 people, most of them children, killed in the Taliban massacre in a military-run school in the country’s northwest in the deadliest and most horrific attacks in years, officials said. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)
A Pakistani camera man shoots video in front of a bullet-riddled wall at the arm- run school a day after an attack by Taliban militants in Peshawar on December 17, 2014. Pakistan mourned 148 people - mostly children - killed by the Taliban in a school massacre that prompted global revulsion and put the government under new pressure to combat the scourge of militancy. AFP PHOTO / Farooq NAEEM (Photo credit should read FAROOQ NAEEM/AFP/Getty Images)
A Pakistani media person walks in the bloodied ceremony hall at an army-run school a day after an attack by Taliban militants in Peshawar on December 17, 2014. Pakistan began three days of mourning on December 17 for the 132 schoolchildren and nine staff killed by the Taliban in the country's deadliest ever terror attack as the world united in a chorus of revulsion. AFP PHOTO / A MAJEED (Photo credit should read A Majeed/AFP/Getty Images)
PESHAWAR, PAKISTAN - DECEMBER 17: Bullet traces are seen on the walls in an army-run school after Taliban attack on Tuesday, in Peshawar, Pakistan, on December 17, 2014. At least 141 people dead, most of them students as well as 6 gunmen killed. (Photo by Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PESHAWAR, PAKISTAN - DECEMBER 17: Blood traces are seen at the conference saloon in an army-run school after Taliban attack on Tuesday, in Peshawar, Pakistan, on December 17, 2014. At least 141 people dead, most of them students as well as 6 gunmen killed. (Photo by Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PESHAWAR, PAKISTAN - DECEMBER 17: Blood traces are seen in an army-run school after Taliban attack on Tuesday, in Peshawar, Pakistan, on December 17, 2014. At least 141 people dead, most of them students as well as 6 gunmen killed. (Photo by Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PESHAWAR, PAKISTAN - DECEMBER 17: Blood traces are seen at the ladder of school after Taliban attack on an army-run school on Tuesday, in Peshawar, Pakistan, on December 17, 2014. At least 141 people dead, most of them students as well as 6 gunmen killed. (Photo by Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Pakistani soldiers and media gather in a ceremony hall at an army-run school a day after an attack by Taliban militants in Peshawar on December 17, 2014. Pakistan began three days of mourning on December 17 for the 132 schoolchildren and nine staff killed by the Taliban in the country's deadliest ever terror attack as the world united in a chorus of revulsion. AFP PHOTO / A MAJEED (Photo credit should read A Majeed/AFP/Getty Images)
PESHAWAR, PAKISTAN - DECEMBER 17: Blood traces are seen at the ladder of school after Taliban attack on an army-run school on Tuesday, in Peshawar, Pakistan, on December 17, 2014. At least 141 people dead, most of them students as well as 6 gunmen killed. (Photo by Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PESHAWAR, PAKISTAN - DECEMBER 17: The conference saloon is seen in an army-run school after Taliban attack on Tuesday, in Peshawar, Pakistan, on December 17, 2014. At least 141 people dead, most of them students as well as 6 gunmen killed. (Photo by Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
PESHAWAR, PAKISTAN - DECEMBER 17: Blood traces are seen in an army-run school after Taliban attack on Tuesday, in Peshawar, Pakistan, on December 17, 2014. At least 141 people dead, most of them students as well as 6 gunmen killed. (Photo by Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Pakistani soldiers and media stand inside an assembly hall at an army-run school following an attack there by militants in Peshawar on December 17, 2014. Militants rampaged through an army-run school in the northwestern city of Peshawar and killed at least 141 people, almost all of them children, in the bloodiest ever terror attack in Pakistan. AFP PHOTO / A MAJEED (Photo credit should read A Majeed/AFP/Getty Images)
A school text book lies on the carpet at an army-run school a day after an attack by Taliban militants in Peshawar on December 17, 2014. Pakistan began three days of mourning on December 17 for the 132 schoolchildren and nine staff killed by the Taliban in the country's deadliest ever terror attack as the world united in a chorus of revulsion. The 141 people were killed when insurgents stormed an army-run school in the northwestern city of Peshawar and systematically went from room to room shooting children during an eight-hour killing spree. AFP PHOTO / A MAJEED (Photo credit should read A Majeed/AFP/Getty Images)
Pakistani soldiers and media gather in a ceremony hall at an army-run school a day after an attack by Taliban militants in Peshawar on December 17, 2014. Pakistan began three days of mourning on December 17 for the 132 schoolchildren and nine staff killed by the Taliban in the country's deadliest ever terror attack as the world united in a chorus of revulsion. AFP PHOTO / A MAJEED (Photo credit should read A Majeed/AFP/Getty Images)
This Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014 combination of undated pictures provided by their families shows some of the students of the Army Public School who were killed on Tuesday when Taliban militants stormed their school in Peshawar, Pakistan. Pakistan mourned as the nation prepares for mass funerals Wednesday for over 140 people, most of them children, killed in the Taliban massacre in the military-run school in the country's northwest in the deadliest and most horrific attacks in years, officials said. (AP Photo/family photographs)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

(Reuters) - The most hated man in Pakistan is a 36-year-old father of three and volleyball enthusiast nicknamed "Slim".

His real name is Umar Mansoor and the Pakistani Taliban say he masterminded this week's massacre of 132 children and nine staff at a school in Peshawar - the deadliest militant attack in Pakistan's history.

A video posted on Thursday on a website used by the Taliban shows a man with a luxuriant chest-length beard, holding an admonishing finger aloft as he seeks to justify the Dec. 16 attack. The caption identified him as Umar Mansoor.

"If our women and children die as martyrs, your children will not escape," he said. "We will fight against you in such a style that you attack us and we will take revenge on innocents."

The Taliban say the attack, in which gunmen wearing suicide-bomb vests executed children, was retaliation for a military offensive carried out by the Pakistani army. They accuse the military of carrying out extrajudicial killings.

The accusation is not new. Many courts have heard cases where men disappeared from the custody of security services. Some bodies have been found later, hands bound behind the back and shot in the head, or dismembered and stuffed into sacks.

Some security officials say privately the courts are so corrupt and afraid, it is almost impossible to convict militants.

"You risk your life to catch terrorists and the courts always release them," said one official. "If you kill them then they don't come back."

The country is so inured to violence that the discovery of such bodies barely rates a paragraph in a local newspaper. Despite this, the school attack shocked a nation where traditionally, women and children are protected, even in war.

Six Pakistani Taliban interviewed by Reuters confirmed the mastermind was Mansoor. Four of them said he is close to Mullah Fazlullah, the embattled leader of the fractious group who ordered assassins to kill schoolgirl activist Malala Yousafzai.

"He strictly follows the principles of jihad," one said. "He is strict in principles, but very kind to his juniors. He is popular among the juniors because of his bravery and boldness."

Mansoor got a high school education in the capital, Islamabad, two Taliban members said, and later studied in a madrassa, a religious school.

"Umar Mansoor had a tough mind from a very young age, he was always in fights with other boys," said one Taliban member.

Mansoor has two brothers and spent some time working in the city of Karachi as a laborer before joining the Taliban soon after it was formed, in late 2007, said one commander.

His nickname is "nary," a word in the Pashto language meaning "slim", and he is the father of two daughters and a son, said another commanders.

"(Mansoor) likes to play volleyball," said one of the Taliban members. "He is a good volleyball player. Wherever he shifts his office, he puts a volleyball net up."

The Taliban video describes him as the "amir", or leader, of Peshawar and nearby Darra Adam Khel. Mansoor deeply opposes talks with the government, the commanders said.

"He was very strict from the start when he joined," a commander said. "He left many commanders behind if they had a soft corner (of their heart) for the government." (Additional reporting by Jibran Ahmad in Peshawar and Katharine Houreld in Islamabad; Writing by Katharine Houreld; Editing by Maria Golovnina and Robert Birsel)

Anger Against Taliban Mounts After Pakistan School Attack

More in the news:
Newspaper: U.S. backed talks with ISIS over American hostage
Pakistan: 77 militants killed after school massacre
Pakistan to challenge bail for Mumbai attack 'mastermind'

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners