Senate to take up $1.1T bill to keep govt running

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Congress $1.1 Trillion Spending Bill Unveiled
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Senate to take up $1.1T bill to keep govt running
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 13: U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (C) (R-TX) leaves the U.S. Senate chamber with Sen. Richard Shelby (R) (R-AL) after the Senate voted to approve a $1.1 trillion omnibus funding bill December 13, 2014 in Washington, DC. Despite Cruz's efforts to delay the vote due to objections with U.S. President Barack Obama's immigration orders, the Senate approved the funding and will avoid a government shutdown. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Senator Barbara Mikulski, a Democrat from Maryland and chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, talks to a reporter while walking through the the U.S. Capitol basement in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Dec. 12, 2014. The Senate is poised to take up a $1.1 trillion U.S. government spending bill opposed by two senators who agree on almost nothing -- Democrat Elizabeth Warren and Republican Ted Cruz. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican from Kentucky, center, walks through the U.S. Capitol basement in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Dec. 12, 2014. The Senate is poised to take up a $1.1 trillion U.S. government spending bill opposed by two senators who agree on almost nothing -- Democrat Elizabeth Warren and Republican Ted Cruz. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The Capitol Dome and the Capitol Christmas Tree are illuminated late Thursday evening as Congress works to pass a $1.1 trillion U.S. government-wide spending bill and avoid a government shutdown, in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 11, 2014. The Obama White House and House Republicans joined forces Thursday to pass the funding bill over clamorous protests from Democrats objecting that it would roll back bank regulations imposed in the wake of the economic near-meltdown of 2008. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 11: Members of the U.S. House of Representatives leave the Capitol after a vote on the $1.1 trillion omnibus bill December 11, 2014 in Washington, DC. The House has passed the bill by a vote of 219-206. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Representative Jim Costa, a Democrat from California, speaks to members of the media outside a House Democratic caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 11, 2014. The House passed a $1.1 trillion spending bill after a day of disarray and just hours before U.S. government funding runs out. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., talks on a phone as he walks from the Senate subway on Capitol in Washington, Friday, Dec. 12, 2014. President Barack Obama on Friday urged the Senate to ratify a $1.1 trillion spending bill that has roiled his Democratic Party, judging it an imperfect measure that stems from "the divided government that the American people voted for." (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
U.S. House Speaker John Boehner, a Republican from Ohio, center, returns to his office after voting in the House Chamber at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 11, 2014. The House passed a $1.1 trillion spending bill after a day of disarray and just hours before U.S. government funding runs out. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Provides $82 billion for food stamps as required by law; allots another $6.6 billion for a program that provides food aid to pregnant and nursing mothers and their young children. Another $21 billion goes to mandatory funding for the school lunch program and child nutrition programs. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
The space program would receive $18 billion, a $364 million increase. Of that, $4.4 billion is provided for the new Orion space-launch system, which last week had its first test launch. (Photo by U.S. Navy via Getty Images)
Provides $8.4 billion for the FBI, a slight increase; $2.4 billion for the Drug Enforcement Administration; $1.2 billion for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives; and $2.3 billion for various grants to state and local law enforcement. (Photo credit should read Joshua LOTT/AFP/Getty Images)
Provides $26 billion for Section 8 and other public housing programs for the poor. Add $10 billion for other housing programs, including help for the elderly and disabled. (Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)
Provides $21 million to continue a project restoring the iconic cast-iron Capitol Dome, which is beset by crack and leaks. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Provides $71 billion for transportation programs, including $40 billion in highway funding for states. Aid to Amtrak would be maintained at $1.4 billion. (AP Photo/Rick Callahan).
Provides $5.4 billion of President Barack Obama's $6.2 billion request to fight Ebola at home and abroad; $2.5 billion of the total would help African countries fight the disease, while $2.7 billion would go to the Health and Human Services Department, including $1.2 billion for Center for Disease Control and Prevention efforts to stop Ebola in West Africa and strengthen public health systems in at-risk countries.
Provides $73.7 billion for overseas military operations and diplomatic efforts by the State Department to combat terrorism, including $3.4 billion to continue the air campaign against Islamic State militants and $1.6 billion to train the Iraqi military. Provides $4.1 billion to train and equip Afghanistan's military.
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, center, walks as she leaves a House Democratic caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 11, 2014. The House passed a $1.1 trillion spending bill after a day of disarray and just hours before U.S. government funding runs out. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 11: House Speaker John Boehner (C) (R-OH) walks to the House chamber for an expected vote on a $1.1 trillion government funding bill on December 11, 2014 in Washington, DC. Congress is attempting to pass a last minute funding bill for the federal government to avoid a government shutdown at midnight tonight. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
$1.013 trillion for core agency budgets for day-to-day operations, with $521 billion for defense and $492 billion for non-defense. That represents about one-third of the federal budget and is essentially a freeze at current levels. Another $64 billion is provided for overseas military operations. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Provides a base budget of $490 billion to the Pentagon, a $3.3 billion increase. Maintaining 1.3 million active-duty troops and 820,800 reserves would cost $128 billion. Another $162 billion is provided for operations and maintenance; procurement of new weapons systems, including 38 new F-35 fighters, totals $92 billion.
Keeps the Homeland Security Department funded at current levels through Feb. 27. Its budget will be revisited next year when Republicans are hoping to roll back President Barack Obama's recent moves on immigration. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Provides $49 billion for foreign aid programs, an almost $3 billion increase. Some $6 billion would help fight HIV/AIDS overseas, while $7.2 billion would be for economic and development programs. Israel would receive $3.1 billion in military aid; Egypt would receive $1.3 billion in military aid and $150 million in economic assistance. The Millennium Challenge Corporation, which directs aid to countries demonstrating economic and social progress, would receive $900 million. AFP PHOTO/A MAJEED (Photo credit should read A Majeed/AFP/Getty Images)
Cuts the EPA budget by $60 million to $8.1 billion, or 21 percent below peak levels in 2010. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
Cuts the IRS by $346 million to $10.9 billion. Blocks the agency from targeting tea party organizations and other advocacy groups seeking tax-exempt status based on their ideology. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio meets with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014. Just days before government funding expires, House Republican leaders are trying to strike a balance between the conservatives determined to stop President Barack Obama’s immigration order and other lawmakers just as determined to avoid another politically damaging shutdown. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2014 file photo, Senate Appropriations Committee Chair Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Lawmakers are finalizing a sweeping $1.1 trillion spending bill to fund the government through September and prevent a shutdown later this week. The measure is the main piece of business facing the lame-duck Congress that hopes to adjourn this week. Republicans will take over the Senate when the new Congress reconvenes next month. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
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WASHINGTON (AP) -- A battle between the Senate's old school veterans and new-breed freshmen such as tea partier Ted Cruz and liberal Elizabeth Warren is taking shape Friday as leaders push for passage of a $1.1 trillion spending bill needed to keep the government running.

Cruz and Warren each boast a national following, but the smart money is on Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., and GOP Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the veteran lawmakers who steer the Senate.

Once Reid and McConnell forge an alliance, the fix is in and passage is only a matter of time.

Still, liberals including Warren, D-Mass., and conservatives such as Cruz, R-Texas, will make their points. Warren strongly opposes a provision of the spending bill that loosens rules on banks, while Cruz is incensed that the measure doesn't block the president's plan to deport fewer immigrants.

Government Stays Open As Congress Advances Poison-Pill Spending Bill

The bill passed the House on Thursday after a day of drama but by a relatively comfortable 219-206 vote. The vote came after GOP leaders sent the House into a seven-hour recess to give the White House time to lobby Democrats angry that the measure weakens rules on trading risky financial products known as derivatives and allows wealthy donors to pour hundreds of thousands of dollars into political parties.

In the end, 57 House Democrats voted for the bill, including two of the party's top three leaders. Democrats argued that there was too much good in the bill to scuttle it and get a worse deal next year when Republicans seize control of the Senate.

"Hold your nose and make this a better world," Rep. Sam Farr, D-Calif., said.

The measure would fund nearly every Cabinet agency through September 2015, awarding increases for health research, securities regulation, processing a backlog of rape kits and foreign aid. Republicans won cuts to the IRS and the Environmental Protection Agency. The 1,764-page bill is thick with carefully negotiated trade-offs on spending and policy "riders" on the environment, abortion and the lead content of ammunition. Democrats succeeded in getting the most politically toxic riders off the legislation.

Reid said he hopes the measure will clear the Senate for Obama's signature on Friday, though a vote may not come until the weekend.

Hours before the vote, House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi of California delivered a rare public rebuke of Obama, saying she was "enormously disappointed" he had decided to embrace legislation that she described as an attempt at blackmail by Republicans. But Pelosi never lobbied Democrats to kill the bill, and Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer of Maryland and No. 3 Democrat Jim Clyburn of South Carolina were a steadying force in support of the measure.

Republicans, meanwhile, limited their defections to 67, mostly conservatives seeking an immediate confrontation with Obama over his moves to relax enforcement of immigration laws. Others simply refuse to vote for spending bills.

But Republicans scored many wins in the legislation, seizing on new leverage gained after their sweep in last month's midterm elections.

One provision particularly galling to many Democrats would relax new bank regulations that force riskier trades in financial instruments known as derivatives into separate affiliates unprotected by deposit insurance.

The White House stated its own objections to the bank-related proposal and other portions of the bill in a written statement. Even so, officials said Obama and Vice President Joe Biden both telephoned Democrats to secure the votes needed for passage, and the president stepped away from a White House Christmas party reception line to make last-minute calls.

In addition to the government funding, the bill also sets a new course for selected, highly shaky pension plans.

Despite the day's uncertainty, there was no threat of a shutdown in federal services - and no sign of the brinkmanship that marked other, similar episodes. Instead, the House and Senate quickly passed a measure providing a 48-hour extension in existing funding to give the Senate time to act on the larger bill. Obama promptly signed it.

The spending measure was one of a handful on the year-end agenda, with the others including an extension of expiring tax breaks and a bill approving Obama's policy for arming Syrian forces fighting Islamic State forces. A bill extending the government's terrorism insurance backstop could get tripped up by procedural hurdles.

A provision in the big bill relating to financially failing multiemployer pension plans would allow controversial cuts for current retirees, and supporters said it was part of an effort to prevent a slow-motion collapse of a system that provides retirement income to millions.

"The multiemployer pension system is a ticking time bomb," said Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., who negotiated the agreement with Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., who is retiring after 40 years in Congress.

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