Scientists work to conserve 2,5000-year-old mummy

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Chicago mummy opened
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Scientists work to conserve 2,5000-year-old mummy
It is a historic week at Chicago's Field Museum as scientists open the coffin of a 2500-year-old Egyptian mummy. Workers have put in months of very slow, intricate work to stabilize and restore the mummy, named Minirdis.
In this photo taken Friday, Dec. 5, 2014, in Chicago, the mummified body of Minirdis, a 14-year-old Egyptian boy and his exposed toes lie in his opened coffin after J.P. Brown and his team of curators at the Field Museum opened the coffin for the first time to begin a conservation process on the 2,500-year-old boy before it becomes part of a traveling exhibition. Brown says they have to fix his burial mask, shroud, reconnect his detached feet, and do work this week to shore up the coffin and mummy so they can withstand travel. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
In this photo taken Friday, Dec. 5, 2014, in Chicago, Egyptian hieroglyphics etched on top of a 2500 year-old Egyptian coffin identify the mummy's name and lineage inside. P.J. Brown, Regenstein Conservator at the Field Museum and his team opened the coffin of Minirdis, a 14-year-old boy, to perform conservation work before it becomes part of a traveling exhibition. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
In this photo taken Friday, Dec. 5, 2014, in Chicago, P.J. Brown, Regenstein Conservator at the Field Museum examines the burial mask on the mummified body of Minirdis, a 14-year-old Egyptian boy who was the son of a priest. Brown and his team have opened the coffin of the 2,500-year-old mummy to perform conservation work before it becomes part of a traveling exhibition. Brown says they have to fix his burial mask, shroud, reconnect his detached feet, and do work to shore up the coffin and mummy so they can withstand travel. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
In this photo taken Friday, Dec. 5, 2014, in Chicago, Richard Lariviere, left, President and CEO of the Field Museum, gives visiting students from Liberty Intermediate School in Bourbonnais, Ill., an impromptu, up close look at the mummified body of Minirdis, a 14-year-old Egyptian boy who was the son of a priest. Scientists at the Field Museum in Chicago have opened the coffin of the 2,500-year-old mummy to perform conservation work before it becomes part of a traveling exhibition. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
In this photo taken Friday, Dec. 5, 2014, in Chicago, the mummified body of Minirdis, a 14-year-old Egyptian boy and his burial mask lie in his opened coffin after J.P. Brown and his team of curators at the Field Museum opened the coffin for the first time. Brown and his team will begin conservation work on the 2,500-year-old boy before it becomes part of a traveling exhibition. Brown says they have to fix his burial mask, shroud, reconnect his detached feet, and do work to shore up the coffin and mummy so they can withstand travel. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
In this photo taken Friday, Dec. 5, 2014, in Chicago, P.J. Brown, Regenstein Conservator at the Field Museum describes the conservation process that will be given to the coffin and mummified body of Minirdis, a 14-year-old Egyptian boy who was the son of a priest. Brown says they have to fix his burial mask, shroud, reconnect his detached feet, and do work to shore up the coffin and mummy so they can withstand travel. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
In this photo taken Friday, Dec. 5, 2014, in Chicago, is the mummified body of Minirdis, a 14-year-old Egyptian boy, his exposed toes, and burial shroud with gold painted toenails as they lie in his opened coffin. J.P. Brown and his team of curators at the Field Museum opened the coffin for the first time to begin a conservation process on the 2,500-year-old boy before it becomes part of a traveling exhibition. Brown says they have to fix his burial mask, shroud, reconnect his detached feet, and do work this week to shore up the coffin and mummy so they can withstand travel. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
In this photo taken Friday, Dec. 5, 2014, in Chicago, P.J. Brown, Regenstein Conservator at the Field Museum describes what a CT scan reveled about the mummified body of Minirdis, a 14-year-old Egyptian boy who was the son of a priest. Brown and his team have opened the coffin of the 2,500-year-old boy to perform conservation work before it becomes part of a traveling exhibition. Brown says they have to fix his burial mask, shroud, reconnect his detached feet, and do work to shore up the coffin and mummy so they can withstand travel. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
In this photo taken Friday, Dec. 5, 2014, in Chicago, the mummified body of Minirdis, a 14-year-old Egyptian boy lies in his opened coffin after J.P. Brown and his team of curators at the Field Museum opened the coffin for the first time. Brown and his team will begin conservation work on the 2,500-year-old boy before it becomes part of a traveling exhibition. Brown says they have to fix his burial mask, shroud, reconnect his detached feet, and do work to shore up the coffin and mummy so they can withstand travel. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
In this photo taken Friday, Dec. 5, 2014, in Chicago, P.J. Brown, second from left, Regenstein Conservator at the Field Museum, and his team of scientists open the coffin containing the mummified body of Minirdis, a 14-year-old Egyptian boy who was the son of a priest. Brown and his team will begin conservation work on the 2,500-year-old boy before it becomes part of a traveling exhibition. Brown says they have to fix his burial mask, shroud, reconnect his detached feet, and do work to shore up the coffin and mummy so they can withstand travel. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
This Oct. 22, 2014 photo shows a mummy at the Walters Museum of Art in Baltimore. The museum collection was amassed by a father and son, and is known for its antiquities among other things. The mummy was determined to contain the body of a 60-year-old woman and is referred to as Mery _ pronounced Mary. (AP Photo/Beth J. Harpaz)
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CHICAGO (AP) -- Conservation work has started at Chicago's Field Museum on the 2,500-year-old mummy of a 14-year-old Egyptian boy.

Scientists opened the coffin last week. The boy, named Minirdis, was the son of a priest. Conservators are hoping to stabilize the mummy and coffin so they can travel in the exhibit "Mummies: Images of the Afterlife," which is expected to open in Los Angeles in September.

Specifically, conservators are creating wood pieces to repair broken sections of the coffin. They're also using new linen to fill holes and gaps in the death mask.

The Field Museum has had the mummy since the 1920s. It's part of the museum's collection of 30 complete human mummies from Egypt.

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