How to make edible salt dough holiday ornaments

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By Kitchen Living with Coryanne

Essential Tools:

  • Parchment Paper, great for using as a worktop surface that can be transferred right on to a baking sheet;
  • Rolling pin;
  • Cookie Cutters, Play-dough equipment, potato ricer, butter knives, forks, and anything that you can think of to give your ornament a little razzle dazzle;
  • Toothpicks or wooden skewers to pierce a whole;
  • Various baking sheets;
  • Acrylic Paints, Paint Brushes and cupcake wrappers to use as paint pots;
  • Clear Varnish;
  • Ribbon, wire, or string to hang your ornament.


Directions:

In a dry mixing bowl add the salt and the flour and mix until fully blended, then add the water and kneed until the surface is soft and smooth. Roll into a large ball and portion out smaller balls to each person making ornaments. Cover with a slightly damp cloth to keep the unused balls from drying out while you are busy creating. Either opt for the simple option of rolling out the dough into thin slabs and cut with a cookie cutter to create your shapes, or get busy sculpting more elaborate decorations.

Once your ornaments are complete, place a toothpick at the top of each ornament to create the hole needed to string it later. Bake at 200F for 4-6 hours to completely evaporate the moisture from the dough. Once dry, use acrylic paint to decorate, then spray with clear varnish to seal the ornament and give it a bit of holiday shine.


See our Edible Christmas tree in the new issue of Box Nine Magazine, free on ISSUU by clicking here.

See the full post here.

More from Kitchen Living with Coryanne:
Christmas sugar cookies
Holiday donut tree
Roasted rose petal beets





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