Greenpeace apologizes for Peru stunt

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Greenpeace apologizes for Peru stunt
Greenpeace activists stand next to massive letters delivering the message "Time for Change: The Future is Renewable" next to the hummingbird geoglyph in Nazca in Peru, Monday, Dec. 8, 2014. Greenpeace activists from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Spain, Germany, Italy and Austria displayed the message, which can be viewed from the sky, during the climate talks in Peru, to honor the Nazca people, whose ancient geoglyphs are one of the country's cultural landmarks. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
Greenpeace activists stand next to massive letters delivering the message "Time for Change: The Future is Renewable" next to the hummingbird geoglyph in Nazca in Peru, Monday, Dec. 8, 2014. Greenpeace activists from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Spain, Germany, Italy and Austria displayed the message, which can be viewed from the sky, during the climate talks in Peru, to honor the Nazca people, whose ancient geoglyphs are one of the country's cultural landmarks. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
Greenpeace activists arrange the letters delivering the message "Time for Change: The Future is Renewable" next to the hummingbird geoglyph in Nazca, Peru, Monday, Dec. 8, 2014. Greenpeace activists from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Spain, Germany, Italy and Austria displayed the message, which can be viewed from the sky, during the climate talks in Peru, to honor the Nazca people, whose ancient geoglyphs are one of the countries cultural landmarks. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
Greenpeace activists walk towards the historic landmark of the hummingbird in Nazca in Peru, Monday, Dec. 8, 2014. Greenpeace activists from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Spain, Germany, Italy and Austria displayed the message, "Time for Change: The Future is Renewable" which can be viewed from the sky, during the climate talks in Peru, to honor the Nazca people, whose ancient geoglyphs are one of the country's cultural landmarks. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
The geoglyph of the condor is seen from a plane in Nazca, Peru, Monday, Dec. 8, 2014. Greenpeace activists from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Spain, Germany, Italy and Austria displayed the message, "Time for Change: The Future is Renewable," which can be viewed from the sky next to the hummingbird geoglyph, during the climate talks in Peru, to honor the Nazca people, whose ancient geoglyphs are one of the cultural landmarks of Peru. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
The geoglyph of the austronaut is seen from a plane in Nazca, Peru, Monday, Dec. 8, 2014. Greenpeace activists from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Spain, Germany, Italy and Austria displayed the message, "Time for Change: The Future is Renewable," which can be viewed from the sky next to the hummingbird geoglyph, during the climate talks in Peru, to honor the Nazca people, whose ancient geoglyphs are one of the cultural landmarks of Peru. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
A Greenpeace activist flies a drone in order to capture video and photos next to the hummingbird geoglyph in Nazca in Peru, Monday, Dec. 8, 2014. Greenpeace activists from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Spain, Germany, Italy and Austria displayed the message, "Time for Change: The Future is Renewable" which can be viewed from the sky next to the hummingbird geoglyph, during the climate talks in Peru, to honor the Nazca people, whose ancient geoglyphs are one of the country's cultural landmarks. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
Greenpeace activists gather next to the hummingbird geoglyph in Nazca in Peru, Monday, Dec. 8, 2014. Greenpeace activists from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Spain, Germany, Italy and Austria displayed the message, "Time for Change: The Future is Renewable," next to the hummingbird geoglyph which can be viewed from the sky, during the climate talks in Peru, to honor the Nazca people, whose ancient geoglyphs are one of the country's cultural landmarks. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
Greenpeace activists stand next to massive letters delivering the message "Time for Change: The Future is Renewable," next to the hummingbird geoglyph in Nazca in Peru, Monday, Dec. 8, 2014. Greenpeace activists from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Spain, Germany, Italy and Austria displayed the message, which can be viewed from the sky, during the climate talks in Peru, to honor the Nazca people, whose ancient geoglyphs are one of the country's cultural landmarks. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
Greenpeace activists stand next to massive letters delivering the message "Time for Change: The Future is Renewable" next to the hummingbird geoglyph in Nazca in Peru, Monday, Dec. 8, 2014. Greenpeace activists from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Spain, Germany, Italy and Austria displayed the message, which can be viewed from the sky, during the climate talks in Peru, to honor the Nazca people, whose ancient geoglyphs are one of the country's cultural landmarks. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
A Greenpeace activist meditates near the hummingbird geoglyph in Nazca in Peru, Monday, Dec. 8, 2014. Greenpeace activists from Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Spain, Germany, Italy and Austria displayed the message, "Time for Change: The Future is Renewable," near the hummingbird geoglyph which can be viewed from the sky, during the climate talks in Peru, to honor the Nazca people, whose ancient geoglyphs are one of the country's cultural landmarks. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
In this photo taken Oct. 18, 2009 from the air, a figure known as "the spider" is seen, centre left in the zone known as the Nazca lines in the coastal Nazca Desert where, centuries ago, indigenous groups etched mysterious figures in the sand that today are a UNESCO World Heritage Site. A small plane carrying tourists crashed Thursday Feb. 25, 2010 near the famed ancient geoglyphs killing all seven people on board. The Cessna 206 was carrying three Chileans and four Peruvians, local airport chief Enrique Gamboa said. The aircraft crashed about 150 yards (meters) from "the spider" but did not damage it, said Americo Baiocchi, director of the Nazca National Cultural Institute.The glyphs are only fully recognizable from the air, and overflights are popular with travelers. (AP Photo/Harold Heckle)
A panoramic view of a Nazca lines figure, next to the Panamerican highway in Nazca, Peru, Friday, Feb. 26, 2010. A small plane carrying tourists crashed Thursday near the famed ancient geoglyphs known as the Nazca Lines, killing all seven people on board.(AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
An aerial photo of the famed spiral-tailed monkey is seen like it is losing its tail in Nazca, Peru on July, 2004. Extensive high-resolution aerial photos of the Nazca Lines taken by Peru's air force after three decades showed what conservationists have been warning for years.(AP Photo/Peruvian Air Force)
An aerial view of a spiral-tailed monkey figure in Peru's mysterious Nazca Lines, located some 240 miles south of Lima, Nov. 3, 2003. No one knows why the Pre-Inca Nazca and Paracas cultures made the figures and lines, some of them miles long, by clearing dark surface rocks to expose powdery white sand underneath. Among theories, the lines may have served as a calendar, a map of underground water systems, or even as landing strips for alien spacecraft. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
An abandoned shelter used by recyclers at a clandestine dump inside Peru's Nazca Lines, some 240 miles south of Lima, Nov. 3, 2003. The lines have puzzled scientists, drawn mystics and attract about 80,000 tourist who fly over them each year. But loosely guarded by day and wide open by night, the lines are threatened by cars, trucks and even the nearby municipality, which used this corner of the off-limits site to briefly dump trash earlier this year. (AP Photo/MartinMejia)
A cargo truck drives along the Pan-American highway, which cuts through Peru's mysterious Nazca Lines, some 240 miles south of Lima, Nov. 3, 2003. The lines, some of the miles long, have puzzled scientists, drawn mystics and attract about 80,000 tourists who fly over them each year. But loosely guarded by day and wide open by night, the lines are threatened by cars and trucks that stray from the highway. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
A bus drives along the Pan-American highway, which cuts through Peru's mysterious Nazca Lines, some 240 miles south of Lima, Nov. 3, 2003. The lines have puzzled scientists, drawn mystics and attract about 80,000 tourist who fly over them each year. But loosely guarded by day and wide open by night, the lines are threatened by cars, tractor trailers, even trash trucks, that stray from the highway. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)
A truck on the Pan-American highway passes beside Peru's mysterious Nazca Lines in this August 5, 1998 photo. Desperate to find a place for trash generated by its growing community, the town of Nazca set up a dump inside a section of archaeological site, sending trucks twice a day across two of the lines, authorities said Tuesday Oct. 14, 2003.(AP Photo/Martin Mejia,FILE)
An illegal road used by local residents crosses the legs of a drawing of a dog made by Indians centuries ago 280 miles southeast of Lima, Peru, on July 28, 1998. Damage is regularly done to the Nazca Lines by trampling tourists and local trucks and if the neglect continues, archaeologists warn, the lines are in danger of disappearing in coming decades.(AP Photo/EL COMERCIO)
Mudslides caused by rains attributed to the El Nino weather phenomenon cross one of the famed Nazca Lines 250 miles southeast of Lima Saturday, Feb. 7, 1998. In recent days mudslides have damaged several lines, but have so far spared the well-known monkey, spider, lizard and other animal figures, which are among Peru's main tourist attractions. However, some experts have warned that if El Nino's rains continue the desert figures could suffer more damage.(AP Photo/El Comercio)
The Panamerican Highway cuts straight through the mysterious figures and geometric shapes of the Nazca Lines near Nazca in southern Peru, June 6, 2001. The highway was built in 1937, before that section of the Lines had been discovered. The Lines are too large to be appreciated from the ground, but rather can only be seen from the air, although they were drawn in the sand between 100B.C. and 700A.D. by the Nazca Indians, long before airplanes and hot-air balloons existed. (AP Photo/John Moore)
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LIMA, Peru (AP) -- The environmental group Greenpeace has apologized to Peruvians upset by its stunt at the world-famous Nazca lines, which authorities say harmed the archaeological marvel.

The apology early Wednesday followed a senior official's announcement that Peru would seek criminal charges against Greenpeace activists who allegedly damaged the lines by leaving footprints in the adjacent desert.

Greenpeace regularly riles governments and corporations it deems environmental scofflaws.

But Monday's stunt timed to coincide with U.N. climate talks in nearby Lima may have backfired.

In a statement, Greenpeace said it was "deeply concerned about any offense" Peruvians may have taken.

Activists had laid a message in fabric letters promoting clean energy beside the figure of a hummingbird.

The drawings etched into Peru's coastal desert are a U.N. World Heritage site dating from 500 A.D.

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